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  1. Sad I missed this! I thought everything was at their brainwashed site. I've read everything at that site. I'm sure I can find it on archive.org or something, there are too many Coil fanatics to not have this big name interview be traced somewhere.
  2. The no part of it interview series was a series of questions answered by 30+ people at the same time around March 2019. A new entry is published on the 13th of each month. Scheduled in March 2019I wonder how many people will read this having not heard of dave phillips. I started this series of "interviews" partly wanting to pick the brains of a number of people whose work I do not fully have at hand. In dp's case, I have heard/bought quite a lot of it, he is very prolific, and interviewed him once before already, but I would add that he is still one of the foremost and distinctive noise artists in the history of the genre. I'm not necessarily speaking in terms of popularity, but the most innovative, yet utilitarian approach to the totally open-ended idea of being able to do whatever one wants with recordings. At times it is as raw and primal as it is classical and precise, transcending simple "fluxus" or "avant-garde" appelations. His work is a genuine mythos of its own. With that, at the risk of saying something less articulate than I have in the past, I'll just add a quote from the previous interview:When I saw him perform twice last year (2011), both sets were distinctly different, but both succeeded in affecting a certain aboriginal feeling in my body, by way of subsonic frequencies or animal instincts or what-have-you, and bypassed my natural inclination to be turned off by what I would normally call sanctimonious presentations in a performance context. One set consisted of several layers of untreated insect field recordings, like a choir that was conducted into an exhilarating sort of Eno-esque hum. Dave passed around infosheets that expounded upon the importance of bugs in the entire scheme of our food chain, and sat barefoot Indian style.The second set was even more visceral, a video montage of animals being skinned alive, a live wolf getting its leg hacked off and its head stomped into mush, or a dead monkey with the word “CRAP” carved into its forehead occupied the screen alongside messages like “errare humanum est” or “the self some imagine surviving death is a phantom even in life”. Walking around with a mask on, breathing into remote loop pedals, and triggering various sounds of animals screaming over string samples, Phillips chiseled together a dizzying miasma of tragically unnecessary pain, graphically unrelenting death, and the intrinsically cruel nature of human condition, who in its “civilized” state, refuses to tend to the ugly corners of reality. It was still the most effective exhibition I have ever seen, and I think that Dave Phillips will be remembered as a shining example of someone who transcended academic circles and noise or music scenes alike.http://nopartofit.blogspot.com/2020/04/interview-series-14-dave-phillips.html
  3. Thank you! It's a very obscure project actually. He only did two other CDs, and they're great, but I don't think you can hear them online at all, and I don't know if there is a way to purchase it brand new online. I do think it is a unique project that deserves more attention, but I'm in the minority for sure. Here is this month's interview, much more widely known artist, but still very unique! ... The no part of it interview series was a series of questions answered by 30+ people at the same time around March 2018. A new entry is published on the 13th of each month. Scheduled in March 2019I wonder how many people will read this having not heard of dave phillips. I started this series of "interviews" partly wanting to pick the brains of a number of people whose work I do not fully have at hand. In dp's case, I have heard/bought quite a lot of it, he is very prolific, and interviewed him once before already, but I would add that he is still one of the foremost and distinctive noise artists in the history of the genre. I'm not necessarily speaking in terms of popularity, but the most innovative, yet utilitarian approach to the totally open-ended idea of being able to do whatever one wants with recordings. At times it is as raw and primal as it is classical and precise, transcending simple "fluxus" or "avant-garde" appelations. His work is a genuine mythos of its own. With that, at the risk of saying something less articulate than I have in the past, I'll just add a quote from the previous interview:When I saw him perform twice last year (2011), both sets were distinctly different, but both succeeded in affecting a certain aboriginal feeling in my body, by way of subsonic frequencies or animal instincts or what-have-you, and bypassed my natural inclination to be turned off by what I would normally call sanctimonious presentations in a performance context. One set consisted of several layers of untreated insect field recordings, like a choir that was conducted into an exhilarating sort of Eno-esque hum. Dave passed around infosheets that expounded upon the importance of bugs in the entire scheme of our food chain, and sat barefoot Indian style.The second set was even more visceral, a video montage of animals being skinned alive, a live wolf getting its leg hacked off and its head stomped into mush, or a dead monkey with the word “CRAP” carved into its forehead occupied the screen alongside messages like “errare humanum est” or “the self some imagine surviving death is a phantom even in life”. Walking around with a mask on, breathing into remote loop pedals, and triggering various sounds of animals screaming over string samples, Phillips chiseled together a dizzying miasma of tragically unnecessary pain, graphically unrelenting death, and the intrinsically cruel nature of human condition, who in its “civilized” state, refuses to tend to the ugly corners of reality. It was still the most effective exhibition I have ever seen, and I think that Dave Phillips will be remembered as a shining example of someone who transcended academic circles and noise or music scenes alike.http://nopartofit.blogspot.com/2020/04/interview-series-14-dave-phillips.html
  4. I forgot to mention that one! It was going for 30% off recently. Not sure if it is now. Essential for their ambient side.
  5. Drone Records in Germany is really a go-to for this, lesser known stuff. Also, while NWW is mentioned in this thread, and I do love Soliloquoy for Lilith, "Salt" is one of my favorite drone/ambient things:
  6. tuesday, april 17, 2012 The Vacuum of Infinite Privacy LISTEN the first half hour consisted of a sound collage of dogs barking, online radio, goats mating, multiple layers of streaming harsh noise from jliat, and drone from Bull of Heaven. the following hour of the show consisted of live radio feedback manipulations and experiments with the 5 live studio mics vs. room sounds. After that, Coast to Coast AM was aired from 5 different radio stations across the country at the same time, so as to use differing delays in streaming and varying programming schedule (advertising especially) to create a muffled jumble of inarticulate words during breaks, among other things. Coast to Coast is no longer aired in Chicago on terrestrial radio, so I intended to air it while also not giving merit to their advertisers (as I think I am legally obligated to avoid).
  7. I can't speak at all to beat-matching, as the only time I've made people dance was when I spun soul music, which was fairly often. More relevant, I guess, is that I did a freeform radio show for a while. I would use 2 turntables, one tape deck, 3 CD players, and a walkman hooked into the aux line, sometimes all at once, not to mention internet and internet feedback, as well as the one time I brought in a mixer and mixed 8 layers of radio feedback from handheld radios. I would often start with a theme. Sometimes the theme would be the particular spring reverb that Joe Meek liked to use, and just see what I could do to roll with that for 2-4 hours, or various tracks which incorporate the use of cartoon sound effects. The idea was often to have a controlled situation where there was plenty of room for improvising, and hopefully a transcendent feeling that one gets from most modes of creative expression. I occasionally do guest mixes still, but if so, I'll download the mp3s even if I have them on vinyl, and mix them in Audacity. I have done a Halloween/60s Monster Music DJ set with CATRAXX (I know) and that was okay live, but what excites me about mixing tracks is too freewheelin' for a live venue. Freeform radio is still fun, though, from time to time. Here is the tracklist from the set with cartoon sounds (no audio anymore, divshare is dead!) http://thedeliriousinsomniac.blogspot.com/2009/01/delirious-insomniac.html Here is a set from when I did soul on the radio: http://thedeliriousinsomniac.blogspot.com/2010/12/delirious-insomniac-something-like.html Here is a somewhat recent guest mix with a lot of different styles represented: https://ihrtn.net/listen-guest-mix-by-arvo-zylo/ I've posted some more ambient/experimental sets in this forum, and those topics are still on the first page...
  8. I basically only get to spotify when I'm at work, which is mainly when I'm online here, but I will check this out! Some favorites I recognize: Celer LULL Cosey Flying Saucer Attack Radigue Basinski and have heard Robert Rich, but mainly from his collaboration with Lustmord, I haven't heard anything I liked of his solo works, but I have always believed there is something out there that I would get into by him....
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