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  1. New podcast: ON LISTENING #1. Thinking (through) the ear. Curated by Arnau Horta. Music by Annie Goh. With conversations with Salomé Voegelin, Peter Szendy, Christoph Cox, Casey O'Callahan, Seth Kim-Cohen and Julian Henriques Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/on-listening-1/capsula To what extent is listening ‘thinkable’? Philosophical inquiry, deeply rooted in the visual regime, seems to struggle when it comes to theoretically coming to grips with listening and sonic phenomena. It is, after all, no coincidence that the Greek term ‘theoria’ (θεωρία) means ‘looking at, viewing, beholding’. This programme explores philosophy’s seeming difficulty in grappling with listening and its counterpart – sound – as a powerful deconstructive means to cut through some of the philosophical certainties that underpin classical and modern Western thought. Can we conceive sounds as objects, or it would be more appropriate to consider them events? How far can the phenomenological approach to sound take us, and how much can we rely on it? And what about new materialisms? Are they more useful, in hermeneutic terms, when dealing with sound and listening? These are some of the issues addressed in part one of ON LISTENING. Timeline 1:30 Salomé Voegelin - Listening as a tool to reconsider philosophical certainties and conventions. 6:40 Peter Szendy - The auscultating subject, power and the fundamental disimetry in listening. 20:50 Christoph Cox - Materialistic listening and the limits of a phenomenological approach to sound. 31:24 Casey O'Callahan - Sounds are not objects but events. 46:10 Salomé Voegelin - Possible world theory and listening. 58:21 Seth Kim-Cohen - Listening as a form of writing and inscription. Anthropocentrism versus Anthropomorphism. 1:09:19 Julian Henriques - Embodied listening as a dinamic mode of engagement with the world. + If you liked this podcast, you may also enjoy this one: ON LISTENING. Research process: Jacob Kirkegaard Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/jacob-kirkegaard/capsula
  2. New #podcast/mix: PROBES #16.2. Auxiliaries. Chris Cutler wonders how far you can go with banjos, mandolins, balalaikas, jew’s harps and ensembles of folk instruments. And it’s pretty far. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes16-2-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20160129/Probes16_2_eng.0.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. In this new auxiliary, we wonder how far you can go with banjos, mandolins, balalaikas, jew’s harps and ensembles of folk instruments. And it’s pretty far. And here you can find the complete series of PROBES! Enjoy!
  3. New podcast: PROBES #15, on experimental uses of the more intractable folk instruments. Curated by Chris Cutler Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-15-1-chris-cutler/capsula In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of 'music'. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. In PROBES #15 we look at experimental uses of the more intractable folk instruments: bagpipes, hurdy gurdy and harmonica. Is nothing sacred? You can find the complete series so far, here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  4. New podcast: ON LISTENING. Research process: Jacob Kirkegaard Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/jacob-kirkegaard/capsula In 2014, we interviewed Danish artist Jacob Kirkegaard as part of a research project entitled ON LISTENING. This podcast takes us back to that conversation. With projects on the deserts of Oman, the Chernobyl 'zone of alienation', Arctic calving glaciers and the tones generated by the human inner ear itself, mapping out Jacob Kirkegaard's artistic practice is no easy task. He allows himself to be led by wonder, focusing on hidden or unheard layers of sound and sonic phenomena in highly charged contexts. Kirkegaard uses accelerometers – special contact microphones that record the imperceptible vibrations of materials – to capture hidden resonances. He later works these sounds into compositions or mixed media installations that channel an access to an inner world, addressing complex and often conflicting realities from a neutral standpoint: it is just sound. A cluster of keywords may suggest an insight into his artistic practice: resonant frequencies; accelerometer; Fukushima; calving glacier; metalistening; space; Palestine; neutrality; radiation; John Cage, hydrophones, cochlear; layering; otoacoustic emissions; Arctic; rooms; disharmonic; sleep; nuclear; recording. Kirkegaard is a graduate of the Academy for Media Arts in Cologne and a member of the sound art collective freq_out. He regularly collaborated with the late electronics pioneer Else Marie Pade. His first retrospective solo exhibition was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde, and he has presented his work at galleries, museums, and concert spaces throughout the world. His sound works have been released on labels such as TOUCH, Important Records, VON Archives and Posh Isolation. In this podcast, Kirkegaard reflects on the importance of listening and argues that sound art can create purely sensory spaces that go beyond our immediate perception, helping us to grasp the unfathomable. Timeline 02:04 The medium is not often the message 06:48 Framing ressonant frequencies 10:26 Maybe I never went to Chernobyl 17:52 Sound as side effect 20:02 Isfald, 2013 25:33 On neutrality 27:05 How to record a place 31:51 Doubt, knowledge, wonder 37:45 Otoacoustic Emissions 47:30 Earprint: Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions 53:43 If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? 56:09 "House of Mare", 2010 ENJOY!
  5. Hey many thanks for the feedback and opinions! you may also enjoy the deleted scenes we recently published http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/alvin-lucier-deleted/capsula Timeline 00:00 People are listening differently
  6. New podcast: Conversartion with Alvin Lucier Link. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/alvin-lucier/capsula A key figure in post-Cage experimental music, Lucier is one of a kind, a composer who, as James Tenney says, makes his fellow musicians find themselves “having to revise our basic (and often unconscious) assumptions – our self-evident axioms about music.” Driven by a curiosity to understand “how things work” (an innocent and unprejudiced curiosity that Tenney compares to that of a child), Lucier always seems ready to disappear within sound. It is as if his fascination with the sound phenomenon leads him to avoid interfering in its manifestation. His work is thus by no means based on self-expression or on compositional interventions. Instead, he allows sounds to “be themselves” without pushing or directing them in any way. To coincide with his 85th birthday, SONA features a conversation with Lucier (that took place in Boston in 2014) in which he talks about the need to listen carefully, the composers that have accompanied and influenced him over the years, and the role of space and technology in his work, among many other things. Near the end, he also explains some interesting facts about “I am Sitting in a Room”, one if his best known and most enigmatic works. Many happy returns, Mr Lucier! Background music: "Music on a Long Thin Wire 1", 1977 Timeline 00:00 Not just listening 00:46 Revealing implicit sounds 02:53 Let it happen: on "Music for Piano and Magnetic Strings" 07:18Transparency of sounds 08:35 The question of space 10:48 Music that happens in a loudspeaker 13:16 Letting the players play 14:59 "I'm Sittting in a Room"... live: something wonderful about real time 17:30 "All I wanted to do is to tell people what I was doing"
  7. In PROBES #14 Chris Cutler take a detour to show how a collision of folk mechanisms, social upheaval, sound recording and electrification underpinned the growth of a new polyglot musical language, and a new aesthetic constituency. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-14-1-chris-cutler/capsula Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150909/14probes_transcript_eng.pdf Enjoy!
  8. New podcast: Angela Dimitrakaki talks about the new feminist critique, the limits of democracy, the wiles of post-capitalism, and the ambivalence of the commons. We also touch on the notions of radical curating and collaborative practices. Featuring music commissioned to AGF and mixed by Lucrecia Dalt. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/angela-dimitrakaki-agf/capsula Angela Dimitrakaki is an essayist, novelist, and Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Art History and Theory at the University of Edinburgh. From the trenches of Marxist-inspired materialist feminism, Dimitrakaki analyses the links between art, the economy, and politics against the backdrop of globalised late capitalism. What type of feminism does the twenty-first century call for? How can anti-patriarchal strategies join forces with the struggle to undermine neoliberalism? How can art history give rise to a new critical paradigm? In her essays, Dimitrakaki discusses all of these issues and examines the ways in which the economy shapes our identities and affects our labour, sexual, migratory, class, and gender relations. Angela Dimitrakaki talks about the new feminist critique, the limits of democracy, the wiles of post-capitalism, and the ambivalence of the commons. We also touch on the notions of radical curating, collaborative practices, and biopolitical art. Timeline 02:44 Feminism / Feminisms 07:18 Struggling against system. We are the system 10:28 Capitalism is a complex monster 15:31 Communalism in times of neoliberalism 18:57 Elections change nothing 23:42 A materialist feminism 27:21 From the cultural subject to an economic subject 32:01 The contemporary art network 34:28 Radical curating 37:59 Some strategies Enjoy!
  9. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #20. The Little People In The Radio present... By Anna Friz link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/anna-friz-interruptions/capsula text+ playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20151110/20Interruptions_eng.pdf A show riffing on the anachronistic childhood fantasy of the little people who live inside the radio and perform all the voices and sounds heard. Turn on the radio, the little people begin to talk; change the station, and they change their voices. Most basically an exploration of the uses and misuses of the trope of the radio host, taken from archival material, scans of the dial and excerpts of works by radio artists, mixed into a landscape of radiophonic interceptions and interfrequency radio sounds. The result is an investigative bricolage that considers the environment, morphology and taxonomy of the little people inside the radio.
  10. New podcast:Interview with John Chowning , the inventor ofFM synthesis: the technique that revolutionized the world of synthesizers andthe sound of electronic music in the eighties. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/john-chowning-/capsula As a man of many, interconnected facets, John Chowning has played a leading role in several chapters of the history of electronic music. As a composer, his is one of the few essential names in any overview of computer music made in the United States in the early seventies. In 1964, with the help of Max Mathews (from the legendary Bell Labs, where computer music was virtually born) and David Poole from Stanford University, Chowning began using Stanford’s Artificial Intelligence laboratory for his experiments. Years later, in 1975, he founded the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford, which remains one of the key centres in music technology research anywhere in the world. Lastly, in his role as developer, Chowning is the inventor of FM synthesis: the technique that revolutionized the world of synthesizers and the sound of electronic music in the eighties. In this podcast, John Chowning charts a historical overview of the different branches of his artistic career, focusing on his interest in the human voice, the creation of new sonorities, and being a pioneer in a discipline at a time when using computers to generate music was a leap into the void between creative eccentricity and scientific adventure. Timeline 02:09 Early interest in sound 09:33Frequency Modulation 13:15 A universe of tones 15:43 The synthesis technique that shook the world 20:28 From artificial intelligence to computer music 22:40 Human voices, computer voices 29:59 Bringing FM to the masses: the Yamaha adventure ---- If you liked this podcast, you may also enjoy this podcast with Arthur Sauer about immersive sound, spatial electronic music, and other applications of Wave Field Synthesis. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/wave_field_synthesis/capsula Enjoy!
  11. New podcast: PROBES #13.2: Chris Cutler digs into new sounds with long-forgotten instruments. Featuring Nissim Schaul, Arvo Pärt, Phil Legard, Ryōhei Hirose, Bülent Arel, George Crumb and more! Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes13-2-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist+info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150729/Probes13_2_eng.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. Related material >>PROBES #13 >>PROBES #13. Transcript >>And here you can find the complete series of PROBES And if you liked PROBES, you will also emjoy Jon Leidecker's VARIATIONS, on the history of sound appropiation and sampling Enjoy!
  12. New podcast: Chris Cutler's PROBES #13 tracks the recovery and reassignment of ancient and folk instruments in unfamiliar contexts. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-13-1-chris-cutler/capsula Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150625/13probes_transcript_eng.pdf Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150706/Probes13_eng.pdf In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of 'music'. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. PROBES #13 tracks the recovery and reassignment of ancient and folk instruments in unfamiliar contexts. The complete PROBES series so far can be found here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
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