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  1. What is Radio Art? What are we doing? Ben Vida, Felix Kubin, Goodiepal, Kenneth Goldsmith, Jon Leidecker, Tetsuo Kogawa, Chris Cutler and Roc Jiménez de Cisneros give their own answer to these ontological question. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/radio-as-art/capsula In June 2014 we participated in the international symposium 'Radio as Art - Concepts, Spaces, Practices: Radio Art between Media Reality and Art Reception', co-organised by the Centre for Artists’ Publications at the Weserburg Museum of Modern Art in Bremen and the Universities of Bremen and Cologne. True to RWM form, we asked some of our closest collaborators to answer two simple questions. You can listen to the contributions of Ben Vida, Felix Kubin, Goodiepal, Kenneth Goldsmith, Jon Leidecker, Tetsuo Kogawa, Chris Cutler and Roc Jiménez de Cisneros in this podcast. Enjoy!
  2. Following with Felix Kubin’s line of research on the creative underground tape scene, in this brief podcast we revisit the origins of the format with former Philips employee Wim Langenhoff. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/wim-langenhoff/capsula As a former employee at Dutch electronics conglomerate Philips, Wim Langenhoff was involved in the development of the audio cassette. He was also a member of The New Electric Chamber Music Ensemble, an Eindhoven-based artists’ collective that became notorious in the region for their anarchic performances in the late sixties. The different sections of this interview are separated by two musical excerpts from the 2008 compilation 'The Spirit of Eindhoven'. The ensemble’s adventurous arsenal of instruments included kitchen utensils, workmen’s tools, radio and TV sets, motorbikes, EEG equipment, gramophones, discarded super-8 movies and various lighting effects. Philips had no problems with its employee’s double life: the company even financed some of Langenhoff’s performances. When the group eventually disbanded, he set up the Instituut voor Betaalbare Waanzin (Institute for Affordable Madness), which he still runs today. Enjoy!
  3. New podcast: PROBES #6.2 Auxiliaries. A musical selection curated by Chris Cutler Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes6-2_chris_cutler/capsula PDF: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131217/Probes6_2_eng.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. This sixth auxiliary investigates further preparations of stringed and brass instruments, in the quest for novel sounds.
  4. New podcast: FONS ÀUDIO #21. Eric Baudelaire Born in Salt Lake City but based in Paris, Eric Baudelaire uses various formats to explore politically-charged historical events and documents. In FONS ÀUDIO #21 he discusses the background and context of the ideas and procedures behind 'The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi, and 27 Years Without Images'. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/fons_eric_baudelaire/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130827/Fons21_eng.pdf In 'The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi, and 27 Years Without Images' Baudelaire creates a transmedia piece (a film shot on Super 8, but also photographs and printed documents) that brings to light the personal stories, the political intrigue and the life journeys of these three iconic figures linked to the Japanese Red Army in the course of almost three decades living underground in Lebanon. Like other works by Baudelaire, this piece emphasises multiple tensions, between yesterday and today, between the real and the fictitious, the absent and the present, over-documentation and oblivion, actual events and memory. Always focusing particularly on Masao Adachi, the Japanese filmmaker and political activist who, in the sixties, developed a methodology for critical analysis based on the observation of the landscape. Baudelaire’s work thus stems from an experimental approach, almost in the scientific sense: what happens when you apply a theory that is virtually an unexplored mystery to the person who created it? An experiment that, Baudelaire claims, raises other interesting questions, regardless of the end result. Is it possible to reconstruct those twenty-seven years of exile in Beirut through the study of the day-to-day surroundings of its protagonists? What narratives can we deduce from the remains of certain architectural and power structures? How do we, in general, reconstruct history through fragmented and terribly subjective fragments? What role do images play in this reconstruction? Timeline 00:20 Introduction to the work 01:33 The characters and their journey 03:22 Masao Adachi's Landscape Theory 08:36 Anabasis as analogy 12:03 Adachi and the permanent revolution 13:56 The revolutionary potential of a camera You can find other features related to cinema and filmmaking here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/cinema
  5. New podcast: PROBES #8, curated by Chris Cutler In this eighth instalment, Chris Cutler presents modifications of string instruments that seek to move away from tonality while maintaining coherence. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes8-1-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140710/Probes8_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140619/08probes_transcript_eng.pdf In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common-practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of ‘music’. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. This programme explores ways to coax some highly unusual sounds out of strings. You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
  6. Most listened podcasts – January 2014 - Ràdio Web MACBA 1- SONA #187. Interview with Diedrich Diederichsen. The cultural critic and music journalist Diedrich Diederichsen talks about the role of criticism in contemporary art, the social dimension of today's music, and the links and differences between the art and music worlds. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/diedrich-diederichsen/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2- INTERRUPTIONS #16. On duration: silence is unavailable, please buy time or switch dimensions. Curated by Dave Phillips. Dave Phillips' mix is a true assault on the senses that reflects on extreme durations in music and our relationship with the temporality of sound. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/dave-phillips-on-duration/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140220/16Interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3- FONS ÀUDIO #24. Antoni Abad. Antoni Abad charts a course that begins with his early sculptural works and ends with his current community-based mobile communication projects, by way of his video installations and net.art. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/fons-antoni-abad/capsula PDF: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140213/Fons24_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel. Part II A selection of records that use eccentric voice manipulation techniques; from human existentialism and sound poetry to electronic, mechanical and computer distortion. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel-collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140113/Memorabilia_andy_votel_partII_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Brian Shimkovitz. Part II. Islamic, Christian and traditional praise music, all have a place in the market stalls across Africa, and are widely represented in Brian Shimkovitz's tape collection. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_partII_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel. Part I Over the past twenty years, Andy Votel has travelled far and wide in a quest to buy as many records as he could. His main motivation is to listen to music, and the only way to get the music he likes is generally to buy and collect it. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131212/Memorabilia_Andy_Votel_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7- PROBES #7 Transcript. Curated by Chris Cutler PROBES #7 examines some of the preparations applied to percussion and voice, before beginning to look at the recovery and invention of extended performance techniques; starting with the piano. PDF: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/probes7-chris-cutler/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8- INTERRUPTIONS #15. Cumulative Tails. Curated by Vicki Bennett Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/vicki-bennett-cumulative-tails-/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131230/15Interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9- INTERRUPTIONS #13 The inhuman voice. Curated by Genís Segarra Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/genis_segarra_inhuman_voice/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130626/13Interruptions_eng.0.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10- SONA #188 Bartomeu Marí, Beatriz Preciado and Valentín Roma talk about the conceptual structure that will drive the MACBA's programming from 2014 to 2016. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/conceptual-structure/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Enjoy!
  7. New podcast: PROBES #7, curated by Chris Cutler PROBES #7 examines some of the preparations applied to percussion and voice before beginning to look at the recovery and invention of extended performance techniques; starting with the piano. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes7-1-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140305/Probes7_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140130/07probes_transcript_eng.pdf In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of 'music'. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
  8. Most listened podcasts – January 2014 - Ràdio Web MACBA 1- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel. Part II A selection of records that use eccentric voice manipulation techniques; from human existentialism and sound poetry to electronic, mechanical and computer distortion. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel-collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140113/Memorabilia_andy_votel_partII_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel. Part I Over the past twenty years, Andy Votel has travelled far and wide in a quest to buy as many records as he could. His main motivation is to listen to music, and the only way to get the music he likes is generally to buy and collect it. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131212/Memorabilia_Andy_Votel_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3- SONA #185. Interview with Maite Muñoz Interview with Maite Muñoz, Head of MACBA Archive, about how the material in the Archive is organised and strategies for dissemination. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/maite-munoz/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4- INTERRUPTIONS #15. Cumulative Tails. Curated by Vicki Bennett Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/vicki-bennett-cumulative-tails-/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131230/15Interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Brian Shimkovitz. Part I The tale of how a student of ethnomusicology from Brooklyn spent a year in West Africa buying tapes off street markets... and how he managed to turn that bizarre collection into one of the most revered record labels in recent years. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_Brian_Shimkovitz_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6- OBJECTHOOD #1. Curated by Roc Jiménez de Cisneros A historical overview and some new perspectives on objects in contemporary philosophy and art. Featuring interviews with Graham Harman and Luciana Parisi. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/objecthood1_graham_harman_luciana_parisi/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130823/Objecthood_1_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7- PROBES #1. Curated by Chris Cutler This programme sets the scene and investigates early reconsiderations of pitch: probes that postulate new scales to be constructed through the ever-greater subdivision of the inherited intervals of equal temperament. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes1_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121023/Probes1_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120718/01probes_transcript_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8- INTERRUPTIONS #13 The inhuman voice. Curated by Genís Segarra Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/genis_segarra_inhuman_voice/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130626/13Interruptions_eng.0.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9- SONA #186. Interview with Sylvain Levy An interview with DSL Collection co-founder Sylvain Levy about collectors and museums in times of crisis, the motivations behind the collection, and the ecosystem of Chinese contemporary art. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/sylvain-levy/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10- INTERRUPTIONS #14 Mattergy. Curated by Carl Michael von Hausswolff Carl Michael von Hausswolf opens our ears to the most obscure side of the radiowaves: a very strange place in the electromagnetic spectrum, where energy turns into sounding matter. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/carl_michael_von_hausswolff_mattergy/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130812/14interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Enjoy!
  9. Most listened podcasts - December 2013 - Ràdio Web MACBA 1- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel. Part I Over the past twenty years, Andy Votel has travelled far and wide in a quest to buy as many records as he could. His main motivation is to listen to music, and the only way to get the music he likes is generally to buy and collect it. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131212/Memorabilia_Andy_Votel_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Brian Shimkovitz. Part I The tale of how a student of ethnomusicology from Brooklyn spent a year in West Africa buying tapes off street markets... and how he managed to turn that bizarre collection into one of the most revered record labels in recent years. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_Brian_Shimkovitz_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3- INTERRUPTIONS #13 The inhuman voice. Curated by Genís Segarra Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/genis_segarra_inhuman_voice/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130626/13Interruptions_eng.0.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4- PROBES #6.2 Auxiliaries. Curated by Chris Cutler This music selection investigates further preparations of stringed and brass instruments, in the quest for novel sounds. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes6-2_chris_cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131217/Probes6_2_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5- EN CRISIS #4. Reflections at a critical juncture: Daniela Ortiz, Marcelo Expósito and Miguel Noguera. Overwhelmed by the institutionalised discourse of politics and economists, we invite artists, philosophers, researchers and poets to share their ideas about what is happening to us, to comment on the positive and negative implications of this structural crisis, and to imagine an uncertain future. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/encrisi4/capsula ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6- PROBES #6. Curated by Chris Cutler There's no end of things that have been laid on, tied to, screwed into or otherwise attached to alter the sound of conventional instruments. This sixth programme draws a map and explores some of the outer reaches of string and wind preparations. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes6_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130909/Probes6_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130909/06probes_transcript_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7- INTERRUPTIONS #15. Cumulative Tails. Curated by Vicki Bennett Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/vicki-bennett-cumulative-tails-/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131230/15Interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8- PROBES #5, Curated by Chris Cutler This fifth programme sets the scene for a wide range of very different approaches to the exploration of timbre and looks at ways of modifying or preparing the traditional piano. Link : http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes5_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130806/Probes5_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130801/05probes_transcript_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9- INTERRUPTIONS #14 Mattergy. Curated by Carl Michael von Hausswolff Carl Michael von Hausswolf opens our ears to the most obscure side of the radiowaves: a very strange place in the electromagnetic spectrum, where energy turns into sounding matter. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/carl_michael_von_hausswolff_mattergy/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130812/14interruptions_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Brian Shimkovitz. Part II. Islamic, Christian and traditional praise music, all have a place in the market stalls across Africa, and are widely represented in Brian Shimkovitz's tape collection. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_partII_eng.pdf ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Enjoy!
  10. INTERRUPTIONS #15. Cumulative Tails Curated by Vicki Bennett (aka People Like Us) Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/vicki-bennett-cumulative-tails-/capsula PDF: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131230/15Interruptions_eng.pdf Cumulative Tails is a pun upon the 'cumulative tale', where each part of a story relates to that which just preceded and followed it. This radio mix, curated by Vicki Bennett, has been created using that process – a succession of audio tracks picked in conceptual relation only to that which was previously played. You can find more mixes for this series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/interruptions-tag/
  11. MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Andy Votel. Part I Produced by Matías Rossi Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel/capsula PDF: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131212/Memorabilia_Andy_Votel_eng.pdf Andy Votel’s first musical passion was hip-hop, which intrigued as well as attracted him: he wanted to find out how that music was made. Thanks to his resourceful father, he discovered that it was based on loops, and that many of them were samples from other songs. That was the start of his obsession with discovering sources, and of his scouring of records that were probably not earmarked for him at the time (the late eighties) given his age, 14, and location, Manchester. While his friends got excited over Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, Andy explored jazz recordings released on labels such as CTI Records and soundtracks by composers like John Cameron and Krzysztof Komeda. Over the past twenty years, Andy Votel has travelled far and wide in a quest to buy as many records as he could. Some have ended up making it into his works or DJ sessions, and others have found their way into the catalogue of Finders Keepers, the cult label he co-founded with Dominic Thomas and Doug Shipton. His personal collection of vinyls, which he admits to measuring in cubic metres rather than numbers, makes him an acclaimed “archaeologist” of unusual records, even though he refers to himself as the world’s worst archivists and admits that he can spend hours looking for a particular vinyl at home, sometimes even buying a second or third copy because it’s quicker. Andy’s main obsession is pop, particularly of the twisted and psychedelic kind. He feels an affinity for artists who have been sidelined by mainstream culture, and is particularly drawn to records that are written on, personalised or dedicated, because they tell a story. An unusual case worthy of study, in spite of everything, he doesn’t consider himself a fetishist. His main motivation is to listen to music, and the only way to get the music he likes is generally to buy and collect it. You can find the complete MEMORABILIA. Colllecting sound with... podcast series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/memorabilia_tag/
  12. New podcast: OBJECTHOOD #1. featuring interviews with Graham Harman and Luciana Parisi Curated by Roc Jiménez de Cisneros A historical overview and some new perspectives on objects in contemporary philosophy and art. Featuring interviews with Graham Harman and Luciana Parisi. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/objecthood1_graham_harman_luciana_parisi/capsula Info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130823/Objecthood_1_eng.pdf MP3: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/objecthood/objecthood_1.mp3 This podcast is about objects, but more importantly, it is about some of the recent theories that offer new conceptualisations of objects in contemporary philosophy and art. This first episode features philosophers Graham Harman and Luciana Parisi. Harman's object-oriented ontology opposes Kant's anthropocentrism and the scientistic standpoint, in defence of a radically broad notion of objecthood; while Parisi looks at the relations between things and data, between macrophysical objects (or blobjects, as Karim Rashid called them) and the algorithms that create them. Enjoy!
  13. New Podcast: MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Brian Shimkovitz. Part II Islamic, Christian and traditional praise music, all have a place in the market stalls across Africa, and are widely represented in Brian Shimkovitz's tape collection. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_collection/capsula Info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_partII_eng.pdf Mp3: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/memorabilia/07_memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz_music_selection.mp3 From different regions and in different ways, praise music in all its forms has a big impact on both the cultural economy and local music industries. In the context of many African countries, major religions from the West like Pentacostalism and Sufi Islam have been incorporated into more local, animist religious traditions. The music that results from these diffusions is often quite popular regionally and distinct-sounding to my ears. My collection has many threads that could thematically link some of the tapes. One of the aspects I have always loved exploring, and I think it is due much more attention, is the array of gospel, spiritual and religious music of all stripes from across the continent. From praise music from Islamic chants by Ethiopia's Oromo-speaking Sufi Muslims to syrupy Tanzanian gospel choir lilt to DIY Kenya spiritual reggae, to chart-topping mainstream Ghanaian gospel, to Ethiopian Orthodox praise music by an elderly monk playing a massive begena harp, this selection touches on many of the religious recordings that have a place in market stalls in African cities. Praise music can extend to the patronage important to musical practice in many locales. In northern Ghana, Dagomba traditional donno drummers (talking drum) sing praise to important people in the community and supporters, as with track six, by Alhassan Ibrahim. Traditional religion plays a big role in varying degrees, both in spirituality and music-laden ceremonies. Vodun praise singers from Benin, alongside the incredible drum ensembles accompanying their work, transform their adherents through the worlds they create in their music, as with track two by Alèkpéhanou. This selection is by no means exhaustive but I really learned a lot more about the breadth of practice, aesthetics and social agency associated with spiritual music in Africa. Brian Shimkovitz, Summer 2013 Enjoy!
  14. New podcast: PROBES #5.2. Auxiliaries Curated by Chris Cutler This music selection investigates further ways of piano preparations: will the torture never end? Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes5-2_chris_cutler_/capsula Info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130813/Probes5_2_eng.pdf Mp3: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/probes/probes5_2.mp3 The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. Enjoy!
  15. New podcast: MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Brian Shimkovitz. Part I Produced by Matías Rossi The tale of how a student of ethnomusicology from Brooklyn spent a year in West Africa buying tapes off street markets... and how he managed to turn that bizarre collection into one of the most revered record labels in recent years. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz/capsula When Brian Shimkovitz went to Ghana on a Fulbright Scholarship for ethnomusicology in 2005, he was confronted with a rich, bizarre, puzzling and extremely varied array of music, mostly released on cassettes. 'I had never really considered going to Africa,' he says, 'but I had this interest in popular music in cities.' And the African music scene turned out to be just the ideal fieldwork project for Shimkovitz. For a whole year he was based in Accra, the capital city of Ghana, but occasionally traveled to other locations in West Africa such as Mali, Togo and Burkina Faso. In all of these places, street markets and stalls provided him with a seemingly endless supply of out-of-the-way material. By the time he went back to Brooklyn, having interviewed a substantial number of MCs, DJs and producers, he had amassed an impressive collection of tapes, but had no master plan for them. Starting a blog to channel his findings ('communicating it to people without dumbing it down completely', as he recalls) seemed like a reasonable enough idea. The name of the blog was pretty self-explanatory: Awesome Tapes from Africa. Steering away from the stereotypical afro-exoticist formulation that had been associated to the World Music market for decades, Brian made an effort to simply share his own excitement for the sounds, the artwork and the richness of his fragmented collection: 'a non-encyclopedic approach to this very, very broad and deep array of music that's out there – that I'm certain my 4,000 cassettes is only scratching the surface of 0.01% of music that’s commercially available.' It was probably this straightforward approach, combined with the viral potential of the web that made the project grow beyond his wildest expectations. Some years later, what began as a fairly underground resource for close friends, some connoisseurs and digital crate-diggers, has turned into a full-fledged record label. Awesome Tapes From Africa reissues all sorts of African tape rarities, from folkloric pop, to left-field dancefloor gems and hip-hop bangers, shedding light on obscure and wonderful sounds from across the continent. The label has received major acclaim from publications worldwide for its reissues by re-discovered legends including Ethiopian accordion and keyboard maestro Hailu Mergia, Somali funk and soul group Dur-Dur Band and Malian chanteuse Nahawa Doumbia, underscoring the broader mission of Awesome Tapes from Africa: contributing to building the international market for African music and helping a few of his favorite artists find new audiences through touring and reissues. You can find the complete MEMORABILIA. Colllecting sound with... podcast series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/memorabilia_tag/ Enjoy!
  16. New podcast: MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Jonny Trunk. Part II Jonny Trunk picks his fifteen favourite tracks from the fifteen best library music companies in his collection. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_jonny_trunk/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121008/Memorabilia_Jonny_Trunk_eng.pdf Creator of a collection of some eight thousand records, Jonny Trunk admits that he has never ceased to follow a maxim that his parents instilled in him at a very young age: 'If you buy something new, you lose money.' Nonetheless, it isn’t the figures that make his record collection exceptional and worth sharing, but the two thousand records of archival or library music that it includes. It isn't easy to sum up the concept of library music or to explain what it is and what it's like. Library music, 'sonorizzazioni' (another of the terms used in this fascinating musical underworld), or archival music, refers to sound recordings produced for professional use in the context of film, television and radio. It is a prolific industry that, according to its scholars, achieved its greatest splendour from the sixties to the mid-eighties, and is governed by series of aesthetic, production, marketing and distribution rules that lie outside of the established channels. It is utilitarian music, created for commercial purposes, in which, paradoxically, musicians and composers take on a professional role and find themselves forced to resolve highly abstract matters and situations, such as developing a narrative that is subordinate to images (in soundtracks) or coming up with an entire imaginary without any pre-existing references. Library music is also a poorly documented genre, full of oddities and bristling with strange experiments.
  17. New pocast: PROBES #5, curated by Chris Cutler This fifth programme sets the scene for a wide range of very different approaches to the exploration of timbre and looks at ways of modifying or preparing the traditional piano. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes5_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130806/Probes5_eng.pdf In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of ‘music’. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. This fifth episode looks at timbre and the many routes to its extension, and then explores the somewhat exotic range of modifications, preparations and ways of subverting pianos that have been tried to date. The transcript is available here: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130801/05probes_transcript_eng.pdf You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  18. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #14. Mattergy, curated by Carl Michael von Hausswolff Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/carl_michael_von_hausswolff_mattergy/capsula Playlist + related info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130812/14interruptions_eng.pdf ‘If these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out.’ (Luke 19:40). For most people energy means power, electricity, sunshine and food. It's a basic need for everyone and in a material world it seems unnecessary to go beyond those basics. You’re born, you live and you die. That’s it! There are also those who believe that energy is absolutely everything and that the enormous amounts of different frequencies and frequency combinations involved hold everything together in one large blob of infinite, intermingling details moving very slowly or very fast according to the circumstances, which is the memory of the past mirrored as the future. Memory is then preserved as energy and this energy might be sleeping, waiting to be activated and then de-activated again. The movement of this enormous blob and its content varies in duration and speed and interferes with the details, colouring them and changing them into evolutionary items we call new. It rotates spirally and touches and bounces off itself, and there are as many centres as there are details. Swedish visionary Emanuel Swedenborg sensed this and has written about these motions and forms in the appendix of his book 'De Cultu Et Amore Dei'. Now, in 2013, we could call it 'Mattergy'. You can find more theme-based mixes here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/interruptions-tag/
  19. New podcast: MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Kees Tazelaar. Part II. Music selected by Kees Tazelaar This mix, clocking in at over two hours, is a retrospective snapshot of the musical legacy of the Institute of Sonology. It alternates classic pieces, recent works and unreleased gems from the Sonology archive. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_kees_tazelaar_collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130313/Memorabilia_kees_tazeelar_partII_eng.pdf The first electronic music studio in the Netherlands was founded in 1956 at Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven. This studio moved to the Utrecht University in November 1960, and was then called STEM (Studio voor elektronische muziek, but 'stem' also means 'voice'). Gottfried Michael Koenig became artistic director of STEM in 1964. Instead of just a studio, STEM became a large institution for production, research, education and preservation of electronic music that had a pioneering role in the development of voltage control techniques, algorithmic composition, digital sound synthesis and electronic composition theory. In 1967, STEM was named Institute of Sonology. Frits Weiland, who was a staff member at STEM practically from the beginning, immediately understood the importance of setting up an archive. This analogue tape archive now is one of the main archives of electronic music, and contains master tapes from compositions produced at Philips starting in 1956, until the late eighties, when analogue recording techniques gradually disappeared. Since I started to teach analogue studio techniques at the Institute of Sonology in 1993, I have felt a great responsibility for this archive. An important aspect of that responsibility is to have and maintain a set of top quality tape recorders that are capable to play back the material from the archive. Digital transfers and reconstructions of early electronic music compositions have led to remarkable CD-releases with works by composers such as Henk Badings, Dick Raaijmakers, Tom Dissevelt, Edgard Varèse, Gottfried Michael Koenig, Luctor Ponse, Ton de Leeuw and Jan Boerman. However, the music selection for contains many unreleased treasures from the archive too. Kees Tazelaar, February 2013 If you enjoy this mix, you may also be interested in our interview with Kees Tazeelar: MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Kees Tazelaar. Part I http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_kees_tazeelar/capsula You can find other installments of our series on sound collecting here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/memorabilia_tag/
  20. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #13 The inhuman voice, curated by Genís Segarra Since the late eighteenth century, speech therapists, linguists, entrepreneurs, artists and musicians have nurtured the dream of emulating human speech. In this mix, Genís Segarra offers a personal overview of a subject that fascinates him, with the story of voice synthesis as a narrative thread. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/genis_segarra_inhuman_voice/capsula Text and playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130626/13Interruptions_eng.0.pdf Summary There is a long history of mankind's attempts to build a machine capable of reproducing human speech. Some of the inventors who embarked on this quest where driven by curiosity – speech therapists and linguists interested for scientific purposes, for example –, while others were entrepreneurs with an eye to business opportunities. The first talking machines date from the late eighteenth century, and many theoretical advances were made during the nineteenth century. But the turning point came with the emergence of electronics in the twentieth century. You can hear an example at 20'35'' of this selection: a demonstration of the Voder (Voice Operator Demonstrator) at the 1939 New York World's Fair. The arrival of computers and microchips led to speech synthesis machines being marketed by companies like Bell Systems, Votrax, General Instrument, IBM and SAM, who developed them with the aim of replacing human beings in communications. At 27'38'' you can hear the first computer that ordered a pizza by phone. 'Domino? I want to order a pizza, a large pizza, pepperoni and mushrooms', the machine says. Although it is fair to point out that the experiment failed, given that the Domino employee hung up on the computer. At 31'17'' you can hear the first videogame that included a synthesised voice: an arcade shoot 'em up called Stratovox. The mix includes several examples of talking software and microchips, but I've also thrown in songs that have used similar technology creatively: from German group Kraftwerk to the Japanese phenomenon of virtual singers. You will also hear songs that use a vocoder, an instrument that does not generate a human voice but can analyse the harmonics of a voice and then modulate it in another sound. This means that it can make any source of sound 'talk' or 'sing'. The vocoder was invented with the same aim in mind: to synthesise the human voice. Although it has now been superseded by chips that can generate vowels and consonants, artists and musicians have developed and used the vocoder in order to stand in for human beings. One of the first machines that achieved this effect was the Sonovox, which Disney used in 1941 as the voice of Casey Jr., the train engine in Dumbo. In this mix you can hear Casey's cheery 'All aboard!' at 17'01'' and listen to him chant 'I think I can' as he struggles to climb uphill at 27'01''. The Sonovox was first used on a record in 1947, in the children's book Sparky's Magic Piano, in which a little boy discovers that his piano can talk and play itself. The voice of the piano was created with a Sonovox that transformed piano notes into a human voice. At 13'59'' you can hear the fragment in which Sparky discovers that his piano can talk. At the other extreme in terms of time and technology, the situation is much the same: at 13'18'' you can hear a grand piano being 'played' by a computer-controlled mechanical system which manages to make the piano recite the Declaration of the International Environmental Criminal Court, a work created by the composer Peter Ablinger with the help of a software programme that assigns vowels and consonants to different combinations of piano keys. Throughout the mix, you will hear vocoders and computers talking and singing. I've included several examples in which I've used vocoders or speech synthesisers in my own works with the groups Astrud and Hidrogenesse. There are also samples taken from a voice synthesiser competition held at the 2007 INTERSPEECH Conferences, in which participants had to make their programmes sing 'The Synthesizer Song'. Several universities and companies participated in the competition and demonstrated their systems. Previous installments of this series: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/interruptions-tag/
  21. New podcast: Probes #4.2. Auxiliaries. A musical selection curated by Chris Cutler Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes4-2_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130708/Probes4_2_eng.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. The fourth auxiliary continues to look sliding pitches, concentrating this time on their use in popular music, before moving on to wholly unpitched probes that begin to map the many aspects of differentiated noise. You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  22. Most listened podcasts - June 2013 - Ràdio Web MACBA 1- COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #9.1 Two Discrete Generative Systems. Curated by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore wrap up this series on generative and process music with a piece created specifically for the occasion: 'Two Discrete Generative Systems'. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_9_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130606/Composingwithprocess9_eng.pdf 2- EN CRISIS #2. Reflexiones sobre un momento crítico. Beatriz Preciado. Escenas eliminadas (Only available in Spanish) We dig up some unreleased fragments of an interview with the philosopher and activist Beatriz Preciado. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/es/extra/beatriz_preciado_deleted/capsula 3- INTERRUPTIONS #12 Lost Techno-Pop Weekend in Rural Midwestern America. Curated by Terre Thaemlitz This show takes a listen to techno-pop of the seventies and early eighties as a brief yet deliberate interruption into the realms of pop, rock, soul and R&B. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/terre_thaemlitz_lost_techno_pop/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130529/12Interruptions_eng.pdf 4-PROBES #4. Curated by Chris Cutler This fourth programme looks at another dimension of portamenti, and moves on into early twentieth century ideas of colour, timbre and the contested territory of noise. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes4_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130619/Probes4_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130527/04probes_transcript_eng.pdf 5- PROBES #1. Curated by Chris Cutler PROBES #1 sets the scene and investigates early reconsiderations of pitch: probes that postulate new scales to be constructed through the ever-greater subdivision of the inherited intervals of equal temperament. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes1_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121023/Probes1_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120718/01probes_transcript_eng.pdf 6-EN CRISI #2 Reflections at a critical juncture: Valentín Roma, Beatriz Preciado and Olivier Schulbaum (Only available in Spanish) Overwhelmed by the institutionalised discourse of politics and economists, we invite artists, philosophers, researchers and poets to share their ideas about what is happening to us, to comment on the positive and negative implications of this structural crisis, and to imagine an uncertain future. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/es/especials/encrisi2/capsula 7- COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #8.2. Exclusives by Keith Fullerton Whitman and Carl Michael von Hausswolff Each episode of this series is followed by a special accompaniment programme of exclusive music by some of the leading sound artists and composers working in the field. This show presents two process-led works by American composer Keith Fullerton Whitman and Swedish artist Carl Michael von Hausswolff. Link :http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_whitman_hausswolff/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130325/Composingwithprocess8.2_eng.pdf 8- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Kees Tazelaar. Part II This mix, clocking in at over two hours, is a retrospective snapshot of the musical legacy of the Institute of Sonology. It alternates classic pieces, recent works and unreleased gems from the Sonology archive. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_kees_tazelaar_collection/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130313/Memorabilia_kees_tazeelar_partII_eng.pdf 9- COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #1.1 Continue. Curated by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore. A range of sound works representing different periods, traditions and approaches to generative and systems based music. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_1_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Transcrip: thttp://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/twitter/Composingwithprocess1_transcript_eng.pdf 10- FONS ÀUDIO #19 Eulàlia Grau (Only available in Catalan) A mig camí entre l'artista d'avantguarda i l'activista, Eulàlia Grau està considerada una de les veus més reivindicatives d’una generació que va impulsar profunds valors de canvi durant els darrers anys del franquisme i els primers de la transició. A partir d'imatges extretes dels mitjans de comunicació l’artista denuncia les perversions i les injustícies del sistema capitalista i els seus diferents mecanismes de control, repressió i pervivència. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/ca/especials/eulalia_grau_fons/capsula
  23. New podcast: PROBES #4, curated by Chris Cutler This fourth programme looks at another dimension of portamenti, and moves on into early twentieth century ideas of colour, timbre and the contested territory of noise. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes4_chris_cutler_/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130619/Probes4_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/probes4_chris_cutler/capsula In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of Art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of ‘music’. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. PROBES #4 concludes our excursion into portamenti, looking at its use in popular music, before moving on to wholly unpitched probes that begin to map the many aspects of differentiated noise. You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
  24. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #12 Lost Techno-Pop Weekend in Rural Midwestern America, curated by Terre Thaemlitz A deliberate attempt to vindicate techno-pop as one of the most important genres of the last century. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/terre_thaemlitz_lost_techno_pop/capsula Related link: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130528/12Interruptions_eng.pdf By the time mainstream pop music really became electronically based in terms of synthesizer/sampler instrumentation and editing (first with R&B and hip-hop, then mainstream pop), the techno-pop synth sound would be utterly abandoned by both pop and underground electronic cultures (techno, house, etc.). In this sense, techno-pop constitutes an isolated and rarely discussed 'lost weekend' from standard pop practices. Techno-pop is most often dismissed as a shade of new romanticism, punk or electro. However, I believe its strict emphasis on electronics and critical rejection of rock culture (at least in the beginning) make techno-pop in and of itself one of the most important, albeit short-lived, genres of the last century. Then again, my views are admittedly warped by an upbringing in the rural Midwestern US, where electronic music was not only scarce, but phobically abhored by most people. Terre Thaemlitz, 2013 More features with Terre Thaemlitz: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_laurie_spiegel_terre_thaemlitz/capsula
  25. New podcast: COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #9.1, by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore wrap up this series on generative and process music with a piece created specifically for the occasion: 'Two Discrete Generative Systems'. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_9_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Related info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130606/Composingwithprocess9_eng.pdf The focus of the ninth episode in this series is a project entitled 'Two Discrete Generative Systems' by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore. The works referred to in the title were developed separately and first heard together at Enjoy ArtSpace, Leeds, UK, on 29 April 2013. The recording presented here is an ambisonic room recording of the event which was open to the public. It is hoped that the works and their combination respond to some of the key themes addressed throughout the series. Gilmore's piece, presented on four loudspeakers, explores behaviours generated by a flocking algorithm. These behaviours are used to control the frequency and amplitude of four oscillators. The piece is presented as a series of 'studies' of fixed duration followed by one minute of silence. In each study the conditions of the flock are predetermined. Flocking is a description of the group bahaviour of living things such as birds, fish and bacteria. In flock simulations, the motion of each agent is dependent on the conditions governing the overall behaviour of the flock, and also on the interaction between autonomous agents. The three main conditions governing movement are avoidance, alignment, and coherence. Although flocking exhibits somewhat chaotic motion, in reality there is a complex set of behavioural interaction occuring between individuals in the flock. While Gilmore's piece explores tonality with multiple loudspeakers, Fell's contribution by contrast uses a single speaker, centrally placed, playing rhythmic structures with a percussive single sound principally derived from the Linn kick drum. Among the arrangement of speakers a computer is placed on a plinth, this displays a collection of sliders that are used to generate and change the rhythm that is played. Audience members take it in turns to change the sliders and make patterns. The algorithm used to produce to rhythmic structures is based around groupings of durations and repetitions of temporal intervals. This simple structure generates a number of distinct patterns. You can find the complete series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/composingwithprocess_tag If you enjoyed this series, you may also be into PROBES, by Chris Cutler: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
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