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Found 7 results

  1. Waylaid & involuntarily inconvenienced in a classified government sleep experiment program? Run audio. *Caution - doors do not open from the inside.
  2. New podcast: PROBES #5.2. Auxiliaries Curated by Chris Cutler This music selection investigates further ways of piano preparations: will the torture never end? Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes5-2_chris_cutler_/capsula Info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130813/Probes5_2_eng.pdf Mp3: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/probes/probes5_2.mp3 The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. Enjoy!
  3. New podcast: Tom Johnson talks about his compositional methods, and the influence that John Cage and Morton Feldman had upon it. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/tom_johnson/capsula Tom Johnson is an American minimalist composer. A former student of Morton Feldman, his music is mainly based on the application of numerical and logical systems. His approach is unique, quite different from the free wanderings of Feldman, or the repetitions and gradual processes of other American minimalist of his generation, such as Terry Riley or Steve Reich. His music is often called conceptual but in many cases it depends strongly on the special tempo and sound qualities of the performance with traditional instruments. Such is the case of the "Chord Catalogue", a 1985 piece in which the pianist plays, without omission or repetition, all possible 8178 chords within one octave. Tom Johnson's music has a special relationship not only with numbers, but also with words. In his operas, such as the well-known "The Four-Note Opera", or in the program notes that he often writes for his music, he uses words not to tell a story, but to make the listener aware of the formal structure of the piece, as well as the evolution of the performance and the process of hearing it.
  4. "Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano (1946-48). New recording by Nurit Tilles in a deluxe 3LP (45 rpm) audiophile box set. The release of this limited edition (433 numbered copies) is in honor of John Cage's Centennial Year, produced in conjunction with the John Cage Trust. Includes archival material, a 40-page color book with essays, pressed on 200 gram vinyl and slipcase. "If the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 marked the end of the 19th century, then John Cage's birth that year represented the start of a new one, musically speaking. Cage created hundreds of works and to my ears Sonatas and Interludes is one, more than any other, that will stand the test of time. Like a Merce Cunningham dance, there is something new to experience with each encounter of this magnificent piece. By my count, there are over 20 recordings of Sonatas and Interludes with each performer (and production and engineering team) bringing something new to the realization. However, this is the first recording of this seminal piece ever presented in a 45 rpm format for the audiophile. It is my hope that listeners will marvel at the breathtaking sonics of the recording, but more than that -- the superlative performance by Nurit Tilles. When Laura Kuhn and I first discussed this project we immediately locked on Nurit. Her preparation and playing is nothing short of magnificent. And as wonderful is her playing, Nurit's beautiful spirit comes through with verve in these grooves. A noted filmmaker said there is no history, only historians. This recording is historic." --Anthony B. Creamer III. Performed by Nurit Tilles, piano, at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Sosnoff Stage March 21-23, 2011. Recording Engineer: Andreas Meyer; Mastering Engineer: Kevin Gray; Creative Direction: Donna Wingate and Naomi Yang." http://soundcloud.com/experimedia/john-cage-sonatas-and buy http://johncage.org/...interludes.html
  5. "In October 1962, John Cage and his great interpreter/co-visionary David Tudor visited Japan, performing seven concerts and exposing listeners to new musical worlds. This legendary "John Cage Shock," as it was dubbed by the critic Hidekazu Yoshida, is the source of this series of releases -- three CDs and a "best hits" double LP compilation. Recorded primarily at the Sogetsu Art Center in Tokyo on October 24, 1962 (with two performances from October 17 at Mido-Kaikan in Osaka), all recordings in this series are previously-unreleased. A major historical trove, unearthed. The performances on this tour featured Cage and Tudor with some noteworthy Japanese musicians playing pieces by Cage and a number of other composers. Volume 1 begins with Toru Takemitsu's Corona for Pianists (1962), played by Tudor and Yuji Takahashi, an indeterminate piece scored using transparencies, a sign of Cage's influence on younger Japanese composers of the era. Following this is Duo for Violinist and Pianist (1961) by Christian Wolff, written specifically for David Tudor and violinist Kenji Kobayashi. The final piece, a near-20-minute realization of Variations II (1961), is a rare example of the rougher side of Cage, work that presaged much of the live electronic music and noise of the following decades, an aspect of his oeuvre which is woefully under-represented on CD. Cage and Tudor, using well-amplified contact microphones on a piano, deliver an electrifying performance, alternating distorted stretches of harsh '60s reality with bountiful silences. The John Cage Shock series features truly historical recordings, all previously-unreleased, of compositions by an amazing roster of international composers. The intensity of these has remained hidden and unheard for half a century, but remains undiminished. Features rare photos plus liner notes in Japanese and English with commentary by Toshi Ichiyanagi." "Volume 2 in EM Records' John Cage Shock series lifts off with a fiery example of David Tudor's piano virtuosity, his mastery of dynamics well-evident in a performance of Klavierstücke X (1961) by Karlheinz Stockhausen. The titular shock of this series is delivered even more forcefully with the next piece, John Cage's 26'55.988" for 2 Pianists and a String Player (1961), which was first performed the year before in Darmstadt by Tudor and Kenji Kobayashi, a combination of two of Cage's solo pieces. The performance here, from Osaka, has a slightly altered title and the composition becomes a seismic quartet with the addition of Toshi Ichiyanagi and Yoko Ono, with the four performers providing acutely-angled blasts of sound. Features rare photos plus liner notes in Japanese and English plus commentary by Toshi Ichiyanagi." "The final CD of the John Cage Shock series features John Cage's 0'00" (1962), also referred to as 4'33" No. 2, performed by the composer, with daily activities such as writing and drinking coffee amplified by contact microphones into sonic abstraction, following the score's directions: "with maximum amplification (no feedback), perform a disciplined action." Next is Composition II for 2 Pianos (1960/1961) by Michael von Biel, lovely and sparse, performed by David Tudor and Toshi Ichiyanagi. The disc closes with Ichiyanagi's Piano Music #7 (1961), performed also by Tudor and Ichiyanagi, beds of silence disrupted by pianistic stabs, music box madness, traffic recordings, percussive thumps, tape manipulations and more. Features rare photos plus liner notes in Japanese and English plus commentary by Toshi Ichiyanagi." https://bentcrayonre...1-cd-em-records http://www.honestjons.com/shop.php
  6. In celebration of the 100 year anniversary of John Cage's birth, we dig up two podcasts on the work of John Cage: FLUXRADIO Curated by Joe Gilmore and Rhiannon Silver, FLUXRADIO explores some of the concepts and ideas behind the music and performance pratice of Fluxus. Featuring sound pieces by John Cage, George Maciunas, La Monte Young, Joseph Beuys, Nam June Paik, George Brecht, Yoko Ono and others, the programme charts the emergence of Fluxus through 60s avant-garde New York, examining the relationship to John Cage, Zen Buddhism and European avant-garde music. Link: http://bit.ly/nkyWNk MP3: http://bit.ly/cLnwxk Transcript (PDF): http://bit.ly/SjmlYf JOHN CAGE. Notes towards a re-reading of the “Roaratorio” Curated by José Manuel Berenguer and Carlos Gómez, JOHN CAGE. Notes towards a re-reading of the “Roaratorio” explores John Cage's relationship with radio, as an instrument, as a studio and as a media. Only available in Spanish. Link: http://bit.ly/RKuxds MP3: http://bit.ly/9zCfYJ Transrcript (PDF): http://bit.ly/IGBc7K We are also highlighting contents related to John Cage work in our homepage: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/home/
  7. http://www.foundationforcontemporaryarts.org/grant_recipients.html http://www.thewire.co.uk/articles/8402/ "The Foundation For Contemporary Arts has released the name of the winner of this years John Cage Award and the recipients of their Grants For Artists. The $50,000 John Cage Award was awarded to Pauline Oliveros for "outstanding achievement in the arts for work that reflects the spirit of John Cage." 14 further artists have received $25,000 grants in the FCA's Grants To Artists program including Jace Clayton (aka The Wire 333 cover artist DJ Rupture) and Rhodri Davies in the Music And Sound category. The full list of award winners and information on the grant programs can be found on the FCA site".
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