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Found 62 results

  1. Hey folks..... Emerging out of the WATMM #massive #meetup back in Houston, Texas at Day for Night festival... myself, Kattin2, and WhitleyStriber are now doing a weekly hour-long radio show using the Discord app, in the original dfn channel, no less! (After all, this is how we met, too!) WhitleyStriber's awesome tech skills allow us three, as admin users, to play tracks in the #snareup voice channel and talk about them. Watmmers can listen live, comment in the lobby, and even contribute/join in the waffling if that suits the flow of the show... we can unmute you and allow you on to contribute in a free-flowing harmonious we-are-all-in-it-together vibe WE ARE THE DREAMERS RADIO SHOW WHAT: We waffle on about all things electronica/idm and play tracks - usually about 3 or 4 each based on the theme of the show. We have a theme every week. Unlike many other podcasts we play old stuff and well as new, live exerpts, long tracks, bootlegs etc. We mention gigs attended and upcoming too, new releases etc.. in "braindance news" WHERE: * www.snareup.com takes you to the discord lobby channel * Locate the discord voice-channel "radio-show" and join in to listen to the show * We will monitor the lobby channel chat for allowing interested listeners to contribute tracks or join in the chat. * we can unmute you if you want to add something - but you will have to put a youtube/sc link in the lobby text channel so we as admins can queue it up WHEN: 6pm Eastern Saturdays = 11pm Greenwhich Mean Time Archive:
  2. Figured this was the best forum for this after the search turned up nothing: http://www.factmag.com/2017/09/18/jamie-lidell-hanging-out-with-audiophiles-podcast/ Not listened to it yet but I thought it might interest some of you.
  3. New podcast: ON LISTENING #1. Thinking (through) the ear. Curated by Arnau Horta. Music by Annie Goh. With conversations with Salomé Voegelin, Peter Szendy, Christoph Cox, Casey O'Callahan, Seth Kim-Cohen and Julian Henriques Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/on-listening-1/capsula To what extent is listening ‘thinkable’? Philosophical inquiry, deeply rooted in the visual regime, seems to struggle when it comes to theoretically coming to grips with listening and sonic phenomena. It is, after all, no coincidence that the Greek term ‘theoria’ (θεωρία) means ‘looking at, viewing, beholding’. This programme explores philosophy’s seeming difficulty in grappling with listening and its counterpart – sound – as a powerful deconstructive means to cut through some of the philosophical certainties that underpin classical and modern Western thought. Can we conceive sounds as objects, or it would be more appropriate to consider them events? How far can the phenomenological approach to sound take us, and how much can we rely on it? And what about new materialisms? Are they more useful, in hermeneutic terms, when dealing with sound and listening? These are some of the issues addressed in part one of ON LISTENING. Timeline 1:30 Salomé Voegelin - Listening as a tool to reconsider philosophical certainties and conventions. 6:40 Peter Szendy - The auscultating subject, power and the fundamental disimetry in listening. 20:50 Christoph Cox - Materialistic listening and the limits of a phenomenological approach to sound. 31:24 Casey O'Callahan - Sounds are not objects but events. 46:10 Salomé Voegelin - Possible world theory and listening. 58:21 Seth Kim-Cohen - Listening as a form of writing and inscription. Anthropocentrism versus Anthropomorphism. 1:09:19 Julian Henriques - Embodied listening as a dinamic mode of engagement with the world. + If you liked this podcast, you may also enjoy this one: ON LISTENING. Research process: Jacob Kirkegaard Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/jacob-kirkegaard/capsula
  4. New #podcast/mix: PROBES #16.2. Auxiliaries. Chris Cutler wonders how far you can go with banjos, mandolins, balalaikas, jew’s harps and ensembles of folk instruments. And it’s pretty far. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes16-2-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20160129/Probes16_2_eng.0.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. In this new auxiliary, we wonder how far you can go with banjos, mandolins, balalaikas, jew’s harps and ensembles of folk instruments. And it’s pretty far. And here you can find the complete series of PROBES! Enjoy!
  5. New podcast: PROBES #15, on experimental uses of the more intractable folk instruments. Curated by Chris Cutler Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-15-1-chris-cutler/capsula In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of 'music'. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. In PROBES #15 we look at experimental uses of the more intractable folk instruments: bagpipes, hurdy gurdy and harmonica. Is nothing sacred? You can find the complete series so far, here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  6. https://soundcloud.com/nevernotfunny/episode-1822-david-wild at about 21 minutes in.
  7. New podcast: ON LISTENING. Research process: Jacob Kirkegaard Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/jacob-kirkegaard/capsula In 2014, we interviewed Danish artist Jacob Kirkegaard as part of a research project entitled ON LISTENING. This podcast takes us back to that conversation. With projects on the deserts of Oman, the Chernobyl 'zone of alienation', Arctic calving glaciers and the tones generated by the human inner ear itself, mapping out Jacob Kirkegaard's artistic practice is no easy task. He allows himself to be led by wonder, focusing on hidden or unheard layers of sound and sonic phenomena in highly charged contexts. Kirkegaard uses accelerometers – special contact microphones that record the imperceptible vibrations of materials – to capture hidden resonances. He later works these sounds into compositions or mixed media installations that channel an access to an inner world, addressing complex and often conflicting realities from a neutral standpoint: it is just sound. A cluster of keywords may suggest an insight into his artistic practice: resonant frequencies; accelerometer; Fukushima; calving glacier; metalistening; space; Palestine; neutrality; radiation; John Cage, hydrophones, cochlear; layering; otoacoustic emissions; Arctic; rooms; disharmonic; sleep; nuclear; recording. Kirkegaard is a graduate of the Academy for Media Arts in Cologne and a member of the sound art collective freq_out. He regularly collaborated with the late electronics pioneer Else Marie Pade. His first retrospective solo exhibition was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde, and he has presented his work at galleries, museums, and concert spaces throughout the world. His sound works have been released on labels such as TOUCH, Important Records, VON Archives and Posh Isolation. In this podcast, Kirkegaard reflects on the importance of listening and argues that sound art can create purely sensory spaces that go beyond our immediate perception, helping us to grasp the unfathomable. Timeline 02:04 The medium is not often the message 06:48 Framing ressonant frequencies 10:26 Maybe I never went to Chernobyl 17:52 Sound as side effect 20:02 Isfald, 2013 25:33 On neutrality 27:05 How to record a place 31:51 Doubt, knowledge, wonder 37:45 Otoacoustic Emissions 47:30 Earprint: Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions 53:43 If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? 56:09 "House of Mare", 2010 ENJOY!
  8. New podcast: Conversartion with Alvin Lucier Link. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/alvin-lucier/capsula A key figure in post-Cage experimental music, Lucier is one of a kind, a composer who, as James Tenney says, makes his fellow musicians find themselves “having to revise our basic (and often unconscious) assumptions – our self-evident axioms about music.” Driven by a curiosity to understand “how things work” (an innocent and unprejudiced curiosity that Tenney compares to that of a child), Lucier always seems ready to disappear within sound. It is as if his fascination with the sound phenomenon leads him to avoid interfering in its manifestation. His work is thus by no means based on self-expression or on compositional interventions. Instead, he allows sounds to “be themselves” without pushing or directing them in any way. To coincide with his 85th birthday, SONA features a conversation with Lucier (that took place in Boston in 2014) in which he talks about the need to listen carefully, the composers that have accompanied and influenced him over the years, and the role of space and technology in his work, among many other things. Near the end, he also explains some interesting facts about “I am Sitting in a Room”, one if his best known and most enigmatic works. Many happy returns, Mr Lucier! Background music: "Music on a Long Thin Wire 1", 1977 Timeline 00:00 Not just listening 00:46 Revealing implicit sounds 02:53 Let it happen: on "Music for Piano and Magnetic Strings" 07:18Transparency of sounds 08:35 The question of space 10:48 Music that happens in a loudspeaker 13:16 Letting the players play 14:59 "I'm Sittting in a Room"... live: something wonderful about real time 17:30 "All I wanted to do is to tell people what I was doing"
  9. In PROBES #14 Chris Cutler take a detour to show how a collision of folk mechanisms, social upheaval, sound recording and electrification underpinned the growth of a new polyglot musical language, and a new aesthetic constituency. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-14-1-chris-cutler/capsula Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150909/14probes_transcript_eng.pdf Enjoy!
  10. https://soundcloud.com/mystic-quantum-records/mq-podcast-004-36
  11. File Name: EatTreats003 Anna Lias - Chris Clark Mix [24-05-09] File Submitter: Perezvon File Submitted: 23 Jan 2016 File Category: Clark "What I tend to do is just jam stuff through as many boxes as I can... until everything sort of bleeds into itself and all its surrounding parts." Anna Lias lays down a thick mush of sublime noisepieces from the electronic entity known as Clark. Click here to download this file
  12. New podcast: Angela Dimitrakaki talks about the new feminist critique, the limits of democracy, the wiles of post-capitalism, and the ambivalence of the commons. We also touch on the notions of radical curating and collaborative practices. Featuring music commissioned to AGF and mixed by Lucrecia Dalt. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/angela-dimitrakaki-agf/capsula Angela Dimitrakaki is an essayist, novelist, and Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Art History and Theory at the University of Edinburgh. From the trenches of Marxist-inspired materialist feminism, Dimitrakaki analyses the links between art, the economy, and politics against the backdrop of globalised late capitalism. What type of feminism does the twenty-first century call for? How can anti-patriarchal strategies join forces with the struggle to undermine neoliberalism? How can art history give rise to a new critical paradigm? In her essays, Dimitrakaki discusses all of these issues and examines the ways in which the economy shapes our identities and affects our labour, sexual, migratory, class, and gender relations. Angela Dimitrakaki talks about the new feminist critique, the limits of democracy, the wiles of post-capitalism, and the ambivalence of the commons. We also touch on the notions of radical curating, collaborative practices, and biopolitical art. Timeline 02:44 Feminism / Feminisms 07:18 Struggling against system. We are the system 10:28 Capitalism is a complex monster 15:31 Communalism in times of neoliberalism 18:57 Elections change nothing 23:42 A materialist feminism 27:21 From the cultural subject to an economic subject 32:01 The contemporary art network 34:28 Radical curating 37:59 Some strategies Enjoy!
  13. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #20. The Little People In The Radio present... By Anna Friz link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/anna-friz-interruptions/capsula text+ playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20151110/20Interruptions_eng.pdf A show riffing on the anachronistic childhood fantasy of the little people who live inside the radio and perform all the voices and sounds heard. Turn on the radio, the little people begin to talk; change the station, and they change their voices. Most basically an exploration of the uses and misuses of the trope of the radio host, taken from archival material, scans of the dial and excerpts of works by radio artists, mixed into a landscape of radiophonic interceptions and interfrequency radio sounds. The result is an investigative bricolage that considers the environment, morphology and taxonomy of the little people inside the radio.
  14. New podcast: PROBES #13.2: Chris Cutler digs into new sounds with long-forgotten instruments. Featuring Nissim Schaul, Arvo Pärt, Phil Legard, Ryōhei Hirose, Bülent Arel, George Crumb and more! Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes13-2-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist+info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150729/Probes13_2_eng.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. Related material >>PROBES #13 >>PROBES #13. Transcript >>And here you can find the complete series of PROBES And if you liked PROBES, you will also emjoy Jon Leidecker's VARIATIONS, on the history of sound appropiation and sampling Enjoy!
  15. New podcast: Roc Jiménez de Cisneros about EVOL's very free deconstruction and reinterpretation of György Ligeti's 'Continuum' and Hanne Darboven’s 'Opus 17a' Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/evol/capsula The name of EVOL comes from the Catalan word for Sambucus Ebulus, a herbaceous species of elder with a characteristic foetid smell. Under this moniker, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros and Stephen Sharp make what they call 'computer music for hooligans' or 'rave synthesis'. Since 1996, their deconstructed rave objects have been released on record labels such as Editions Mego, Diagonal, Entr'acte, Presto!?, and ALKU, and presented as installations and live performances worldwide. Even though they reject a clear divide between high and low culture, their aesthetic exploration of algorithmic composition could be said to occupy a neutral place between academia, experimental music and club music. With influences ranging from popular culture – from Basshunter to 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind' - to highbrow music by composers such as György Ligeti and Hanne Darboven, their music is slippery as slime when it comes to definitions. As their close friend Goodiepal put it a while ago: 'it’s radical computer music'. A list of keywords that have been applied to their work may offer some clues to crucial and lateral aspects of their work: rave, synthesis, elasticity, time dilation, chronesthesia, goo, hoover, hoover-stretching, hyperobject, slime, psychedelia, altered states, fractal, upward spiral, downward spiral, warping, hooliganism, mereology, horns, horny, kaiju, tetrafluoroethane, acid, anti-humanism, mentasmic, climax, freeze-frame, recursive, poing, non-anthem, strobe, party boobytrap, fold-in, continuum, squashed, monolith, asymmetry, homeomorphic, recurrence, fluorescence, phlop. SONA talks with Roc Jiménez de Cisneros about EVOL's very free deconstruction and reinterpretation of György Ligeti's 'Continuum' and Hanne Darboven’s 'Opus 17a', and how these works relate to the duo’s current artistic practice. Unusual notions of time in relation to music, algorithmic reverse engineering, complexity through simplicity, anti-climax, ancient trance music, weird mental states and Dick Higgins' Superboredom concept pop up in the conversation. More EVOL @Radio_Web_MACBA: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_2_evol_marcus_schmickler/capsula Enjoy!
  16. New podcast: Chris Cutler's PROBES #13 tracks the recovery and reassignment of ancient and folk instruments in unfamiliar contexts. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes-13-1-chris-cutler/capsula Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150625/13probes_transcript_eng.pdf Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150706/Probes13_eng.pdf In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of 'music'. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. PROBES #13 tracks the recovery and reassignment of ancient and folk instruments in unfamiliar contexts. The complete PROBES series so far can be found here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  17. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #19. The possibility of drumming, by Morten J. Olsen (of N.M.O and MoHa! fame) One can easily compile a list of tags to describe a mix, but the real question is whether the list comes after the mix, or whether all those items in the list were already in the author’s practise/background to begin with. Or maybe it’s a bit of both? Innate music, innate rhythms, universal grammar, YouTube-anthropology, vestigiality, rudiments, Swiss mercenaries, acid techno and other elemental forms of expression. Norwegian drummer Morten J. Olsen (of N.M.O and MoHa! fame) delivers a true tour de force of a mix in which he manages to connect all those more or less distant dots, in order to share his very unique views on percussion music. Listen: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/drumming-morten-j-olsen/capsula Read: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150608/19Interruptions_eng.pdf Think: If we look at it from an outside point of view, from the point of view of an alien, it seems there is no actual need for music at all. I’ve heard it being called cheesecake, Robin Hayward mentioned it, quoting someone I don’t know, maybe it means we like it but it doesn’t serve a clear purpose for survival? At first this may seem like it goes against an idea of a universal grammar of music, but, in fact it works quite well considering we are equipped with many traits and tools that we are not quite sure anymore what they are needed for, i.e. they have lost their original function (these include the tailbone and the appendix, Darwin’s tubercle – which is a piece on 10% of the populations ears, and also goosebumps) – and music? Or is it rather that we haven’t discovered its true function, yet? Anyway this phenomenon is called (human) vestigiality.11 Incidentally, the same phenomenon is called ‘rudiment’ in Germanic languages. And then we are right at the core of where my mix is going: ‘In percussion music, a rudiment is one of a number of relatively small patterns which form the foundation for more extended and complex drum patterns.’ 12 Wikipedia continues: ‘The term “rudiment” in this context means not only “basic”, but also fundamental. While any level of drumming may, in some sense, be broken down by analysis into a series of component rudiments, the term “drum rudiment” is most closely associated with various forms of field drumming, also known as rudimental drumming.’ Morten J. Olsen + You can find the complete INTERRUPTIONS mix series here (feat. mixes by Dave Phillips, Felix Kubin, Wobbly, Chris Brown, Terre Thaemlitz, Vicki Bennett, Carl Michael von Hausswolf, Ben Vida, Kenneth Goldsmith...) http://rwm.macba.cat/en/interruptions-tag
  18. Harpsichords boldly go. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes12-2-chris-cutler/capsula The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. This is the auxiliary in which harpsichords boldly go. The complete series (so far) can be found here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  19. Alpharaver N°43 feat. tracks by Privacy, Exaltics, Labyrinthine, Fah and others Tracklist in soundcloud comments. https://soundcloud.com/rebootfm/alpharaver0515 http://reboot.fm
  20. New podcast: PROBES #11.2 listens to voices, mostly in groups, doing extraordinary things. Curated by Chris Cutler. Featuring Karlheinz Stockhausen's Orchestra Strike, The Residents, The Beach Boys, Mauricio Kagel, Ernst Jandl... Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes11-2-chris-cutler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20150409/Probes11_2_eng.pdf The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. This auxiliary listens to voices, mostly in groups, doing extraordinary things. The complete series can be found here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag Enjoy!
  21. COMPOSING WITH PROCESS is a podcast series, curated by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore and commissioned by Radio Web MACBA, exploring generative approaches to composition and performance primarily in the context of experimental technologies and music practices of the latter part of the 20th Century. Below we compiled all the episodes and information: COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #1.1. Continue. A range of sound works representing different periods, traditions and approaches to generative and systems based music. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_1_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/process/composingwithprocess1_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120201/Composingwithprocess1_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #1.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by German artist Florian Hecker and Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_florian_hecker_ryoji_ikeda/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20100921/composingwithprocess1_2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #2.1. Systems. The role of formalised systems in music making. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_1_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/process/composingwithprocess1_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120201/Composingwithprocess2_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #2.2. Exclusives. 10.12.2010 (38' 18'') Exclusive music by Marcus Schmickler and EVOL. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_2_evol_marcus_schmickler/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20101209/Composingwithprocess2.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #3.1. Determinacy and indeterminacy. This episode looks at how chance has been used in a variety of ways in the composition and performance of musical works. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_3_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20110420/Composingwithprocess3_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120201/Composingwithprocess3_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #3.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by Yasunao Tone and Christophe Charles. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_yasunao_tone_christophe_charles/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20110608/Composingwithprocess3.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #4.1. Time. The relationship between time and music and the impact of technological development and how time is treated within a range of musical idioms. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_4_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20110907/Composingwithprocess4_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120201/Composingwithprocess4_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #4.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by Laurie Spiegel and Terre Thaemlitz Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_laurie_spiegel_terre_thaemlitz/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20110928/Composingwithprocess4.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #5.1. Duration. This episode explores the concept of duration in music. It examines the different ways that composers and musicians have explored duration in terms of both the large and small. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_5_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20111214/Composingwithprocess5_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120201/Composingwithprocess5_transcript_eng.0.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #5.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by Ben Vida and THE HUB. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_ben_vida_the_hub/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120207/Composingwithprocess5.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #6.1. Space. This episode explores sound in relation to space. It considers various ways in which composers have utilised acoustic space as an active element in the process of music composition. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_6_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120328/Composingwithprocess6_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120411/Composingwithprocess6_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #6.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by Stephan Mathieu and Russell Haswell. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/omposingwithprocess_exclusives_stephan_mathieu_russell_haswell/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120508/Composingwithprocess6.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #7.1. Approaches to change. This episode considers the notion of change in music. It asks how we perceive and quantify change in musical structures, and how generative processes disrupt and enlarge our sense of surprise, expectation, tension and boredom. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_7_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120807/Composingwithprocess7_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120917/Composingwithprocess7_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #7.2. Exclusives. Two exclusive works-interviews by Goodiepal. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_goodiepal/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20120907/Composingwithprocess7.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #8.1. Models of change. This episode considers the notion of change in music. It looks at how scientific and mathematical concepts can be used to model change in the acoustic domain. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_8_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121009/Composingwithprocess8_eng.pdf Transcript: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121023/Composingwithprocess8_transcript_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #8.2. Exclusives. Exclusive music by Keith Fullerton Whitman and Carl Michael von Hausswolff. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_exclusives_whitman_hausswolff/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130325/Composingwithprocess8.2_eng.pdf COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #9.1. Two Discrete Generative Systems. Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore wrap up this series on generative and process music with a piece created specifically for the occasion: 'Two Discrete Generative Systems'. Podcast: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_9_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula Playlist: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130606/Composingwithprocess9_eng.pdf + You can find the complete podcast series here: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/composingwithprocess_tag So... ENJOY!
  22. Ràdio Web MACBA's most listened podcasts 2014 1- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Andy Votel Part I. Produced by Matias Rossi Over the past twenty years, Andy Votel has travelled far and wide in a quest to buy as many records as he could. His main motivation is to listen to music, and the only way to get the music he likes is generally to buy and collect it. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-andy-votel/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131212/Memorabilia_Andy_Votel_eng.pdf 2- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH.... Brian Shimkovitz. Part I. Produced by Matias Rossi The tale of how a student of ethnomusicology from Brooklyn spent a year in West Africa buying tapes off street markets... and how he managed to turn that bizarre collection into one of the most revered record labels in recent years. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia_brian_shimkovitz/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130903/Memorabilia_Brian_Shimkovitz_eng.pdf 3- PROBES #1. Curated by Chris Cutler PROBES #1 sets the scene and investigates early reconsiderations of pitch: probes that postulate new scales to be constructed through the ever-greater subdivision of the inherited intervals of equal temperament. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes1_chris_cutler_/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20121023/Probes1_eng.pdf 4- ONLY GIRLS OF 17 CAN HEAR UP TO 16.000 HERTZ. A short history of the audio cassette. Curated by Felix Kubin Following with Felix Kubin’s line of research on the creative underground tape scene, in this brief podcast we revisit the origins of the format with former Philips employee Wim Langenhoff. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/extra/wim-langenhoff/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140917/Wim_eng_PDF.pdf 5- INTERRUPTIONS #16. On duration: silence is unavailable, please buy time or switch dimensions. Curated by Dave Phillips Dave Phillips' mix is a true assault on the senses that reflects on extreme durations in music and our relationship with the temporality of sound. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/dave-phillips-on-duration/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140220/16Interruptions_eng.pdf 6- MEMORABILIA. COLLECTING SOUNDS WITH... Eric Isaacson. Part I. Produced by Rosanna Arbon It may seem obvious looking back but Eric Isaacson had no idea that a childhood obsession with The Beatles and an armful of Daniel Johnston cassettes would be the foundation for his work as founder of Mississippi Records label and shop and the keeper of a uniquely free flowing record collection that is detached from time. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/memorabilia-eric-isaacson/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140313/Memorabilia_Eric_Isaacson_eng.pdf 7- PROBES #3. Curated by Chris Cutler This is where pitch becomes weightless and all that is solid melts into air: futurism, noise, electricity, ecstasy and uncertainty. We look at the lure and power of sliding tones. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes3_chris_cutler_/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20130221/Probes3_eng.pdf 8- OBJECTHOOD #2. Curated by Roc Jiménez de Cisneros Cuts, folds, scales, sound objects, charts, chimeras. Artists Erick Beltrán and Florian Hecker discuss different theories about objects in relation to their respective artistic practices. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/objecthood2-florian-hecker-erick-beltran/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20140613/Objecthood_2_en.pdf 9- SONA #119 Interview with Allan Sekula about the relationship between art and photography, about artistic activism, the role of the artist in the public sphere and "Waiting for Tear Gas". Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/allan_sekula/capsula 10- INTERRUPTIONS #15. Cumulative Tails. Curated by Vicki Bennett Cumulative Tails is a pun upon the 'cumulative tale', where each part of a story relates to that which just preceded and followed it. This radio mix, curated by Vicki Bennett, has been created using that process – a succession of audio tracks picked in conceptual relation only to that which was previously played. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/vicki-bennett-cumulative-tails-/capsula More info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20131230/15Interruptions_eng.pdf
  23. So this is an idea that has been mentioned before. I think it would be a good idea. What are your thoughts?
  24. This mix explores extended techniques for percussion and winds. Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/probes9-2-chris-cutler/capsula The PROBES Auxiliaries collect materials related to each episode that try to give a broader – and more immediate – impression of the field. They are a scan, not a deep listening vehicle; an indication of what further investigation might uncover and, for that reason, most are edited snapshots of longer pieces. We have tried to light the corners as well as the central arena, and to not privilege so-called serious over so-called popular genres. This auxiliary explores extended techniques for percussion and winds. Enjoy!
  25. New podcast: INTERRUPTIONS #18. Vox et repetitio, curated by Eduard Escoffet #soundpoetry Curated by Eduard Escoffet Link: http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/interruptions-eduard-escoffet/capsula Actual recording was not an option until the twentieth century, when technology made it possible to record, play back, process and multiply the voice of the poet. One source, infinite layers. A machine for expressing the multiplicity that exists in every voice, in every person. This led to the birth of a new genre, a new path that is in reality simply a revival of the original poetry which existed before print: voice and repetition. In this mix we capture some of the infinite instances of voice and repetition in Eduard Escoffet's sound poetry collection. Enjoy!
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