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Found 9 results

  1. Reinhold Weber, born in 1927, was known as a pioneer of electronic music. In his compositions, Weber placed a focus on twelve-tone music, he became increasingly fascinated in the field of computer music since the 1970s. He produced numerous works at the Studio for Electronic Music at the University of Karlsruhe. Released in our Early Electronic series released March 4, 2022
  2. The complete works of one of the pioneers of Belgian early electronics. This 3CD set highlights Leo Kupper's earliest unique compositions produced during the 60's to 90'swhen he was ardently seeking out structures distinctly applicable to purely electronic sounds. His GAME machine - Générateur Automatique de Musique Electronique (Automatic Generator of Electronic Music) was constructed during such period and spirit of renewal and technical exploration. Released in our Early Electronic series credits released January 30, 2022 Leo Kupper was born in Nidrum, Hautes Fagnes (Eastern Belgium) on the 16th of April 1935. He studied musicology at the Liège Conservatory, then became the assistant of Henri Pousseur who, in 1958, had just founded the Apelac Studio in Brussels. Kupper started to work on his first pieces there, but he would finalize them only upon putting together his own studio in 1967: the Studio de Recherches et de Structurations Electroniques Auditives (which means 'studio of audio electronic research & structuring'). That is where he would compose, to this day, over forty works, most of them on instruments of his own design. In the '70s and '80s, he built a series of Sound Domes (briefly established in Rome, Linz, Venice, and Avignon), places where every sound, every phonem uttered by the listening audience was transformed by hundreds of loudspeakers of various sizes organized in a dome shape. This device transformed sounds through space AND time: something said could be morphed into another sound hours, days, perhaps years later. Leo had envisioned that a device like his, a place for contemplation, would be much-needed in cities where Nature had been evacuated. In the late '70s, after discovering Iranian music master Hussein Malek, Kupper became one of the very few Western virtuosos of the santur. His first pieces were released by Deutsche Grammophon and, later, Igloo. His latest works have been released by the New York-based label Pogus. The GAME machine In 1961, having terminated his musicology studies, Leo Kupper left Liège for Brussels. By that time, centres for music research such as those in Cologne, Paris and Milan had already produced works of experimental music, where pioneers were forging new and diverse routes in electronic music, 'musique concrète' and electro-vocal music. The GAME machine - Générateur Automatique de Musique Electronique (Automatic Generator of Electronic Music) was constructed during such period and spirit of renewal and technical exploration. The GAME consisted of a collection of variable 'sonic cells' sensitive to modulations of positive and negative voltages and programmable manually through the aid of colour-coded cables. Complex electronic loops and sound from loudspeakers and from microphone pick-ups were then either recorded by tape-machines or performed and interpreted by musicians who opened automatic channels, thus triggering automatic sound to exit the speakers. This in turn penetrated the machines by means of microphones and was replayed. Here then was an entirely new way of playing a musical instrument and how the works here were composed and performed.
  3. ghost cell V by Sanjuro77 Fifth year of my annual generative experiments. Featuring TR606 QS, Nord G2, Organelle, PreenFM2, Future Retro Zillion, Microcell, Morphagene, 0-Coast & laptop.
  4. https://crueldiagonals.bandcamp.com/album/pulse-of-indignation This came bundled as a cassette with the 'Disambiguation' LP last year, great to see a digital release.
  5. http://www.inagrm.com/parution-cd-bernard-parmegiani-matieres-premieres After Bernard Parmegiani's passing in 2013, his wife commissioned the GRM for the preservation of his tapes that weren't already put into digital. They found 3 finished pieces from circa 80 which make the first disc (one of those, "L'écho du miroir", featuring Michael Lonsdale speaking as he was lost in a sort of labyrinth, supposed to be inspired by the work of M.C. Escher), and 30 "matières premières" which found their way on the second. Hearing those works in progress let us wonder that he had still so many things in him for the future...
  6. Guest

    ZÓÓ niet GOED

    Oy watumm's, Have put up a free/pay what you want album on my bandcamp page featuring my more noisier, beatless stuff, processed fieldrecordings & what not mostly made this year. Find the album here; https://plugexpert.bandcamp.com/album/z-niet-goed Example tracks; http://soundcloud.com/plugexpert/richard-jonas-oedjang-kapok http://soundcloud.com/plugexpert/richard-jonas-scp
  7. Guest

    Musique Concrete

    So yeah.. I need some more musique concrete. Give me those beeps and boops. https://soundcloud.com/experimedia/eric-lanham-the-sincere And here's the whole album: http://www.junodownload.com/products/the-sincere-interruption/1976066-02/
  8. Long awaited 2CD from an unsung hero of contemporary experimental music is finally out. I think there might be a few takers for this on WATMM. Copy pasting one of the most on-point album descriptions I've read all year: Buy: http://www.23five.org/publications/gpark_sub.html Listen: https://soundcloud.com/23five/g-park-stack-from-the-2cd-sub Watch: https://vimeo.com/60370355
  9. Jim Jupp of Ghost Box posted to this blog post containing music that was supposedly commissioned by Philips for the Philips Evoluon Technology Exhibition at Eindhoven in the Netherlands, 1967. Another video supposedly commissioned for Krups. The tracks are credited to Dutch composer Jan W. Gruber and supposedly made in 1967. They are pretty nice tracks, but I am doubtful that it really is from that era. I had left a comment on the user's YouTube channel asking where the user got the music from and whether it was really from '67. It has been deleted and/or channel comments have been disabled. There are a total of 3 tracks on the YouTube channel Maersk NL right now. The instrumentation is right for '67 but the production sounds a little too clean and exact to have been made around that time. If you take a listen to Tom Dissevelt's (and also by a Dutchman ) Whirling/Sonic Re-entry which was made a year later than these tracks were supposedly made the percussive loops is not nearly as in time with the other tracks as it is with the Jan W. Gruber tunes. Especially in Krups Theme with the 6 plus measures of triplets bass notes so precisely in sync with all of the other tracks. The only way to do this at this time would be with two tape loops or a tape loop and an analog sequencer but they would eventually go out of synch after a couple of measures. "Philips Expo Theme 4" has a backward mask part of a triangle-type sound right after the forward version. Super easy to do (and a popular technique) with modern production, but very a painstakingly intricate detail for '67. Also, it is too good to not find it being mentioned in the same breath as Tom Dissevelt, Raymond Scott, and all of the BBC Radiophonic composers all these years. But I guess it is possible is has been languishing in obscurity for 45 years. After Googleing "Jan W. Gruber" a few hours after the videos were posted the only results were the YouTube channel the videos were posted to and Jim's post. So who do you think might have really made these tracks?
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