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Is Hyperpop The Future Of Pop?


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oneohtrix point never must have been pissed back in 2014 when he paid jon giraffeman $800 to make a music video & he just sent him back a powerpoint document full of pictures of fursonas & melting anime girls. little did he know at the time that this would become an entire music genre. nay. a way of life.

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11 hours ago, brian trageskin said:

this is the worst music ever made by human beans. no amount of pseudo-edgy *cringe* visuals will save it from the trash heap where it belongs.

i only like the instrumental tbh but you are definitely wrong saying that it's the worse music ever made. i can think of things much worse

11 hours ago, Wunderbar said:

@cyanobacteriahow old are you im just wondering ?

make fun of people all you want but can i remind you that you are currently posting on an IDM internet forum. 7 billion people on earth are probably laughing at us so i'd probably pipe down

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, milkface said:

i only like the instrumental tbh but you are definitely wrong saying that it's the worse music ever made. i can think of things much worse

make fun of people all you want but can i remind you that you are currently posting on an IDM internet forum. 7 billion people on earth are probably laughing at us so i'd probably pipe down

Lol what? I wasnt trying to make fun of him im just wondering what demographic this appeals to ? You dont have to start projecting your insecurities on to me.

Edited by Wunderbar
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15 minutes ago, Wunderbar said:

Lol what? I wasnt trying to make fun of him im just wondering what demographic this appeals to ? You dont have to start projecting your insecurities on to me.

chill lol im only messing with u. hyperpop's (and other subgenres) demographic ranges from around 15 to mid 20s from what i've seen because the more accessible stuff like charli xcx is popular with the older listeners and hypertrap is more popular with the younger ones

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Posted (edited)

Production on some Charli XCX songs is way more interesting and forward looking than idm which is still aping late 90s acid breaks

Edited by Brian Dance
sosij
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Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, Wunderbar said:

arent we all.

i quite like the production on some charlie xcx songs very sophie like.

some of them are! vroom vroom was produced by sophie but there may be some others.

edit: she produced the whole ep

 

Edited by milkface
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its interesting how low res cgi graphics back in the day used to signal "futuristic", whereas when i see it on stuff from the last decade my read is "the uncanny contained within the mundane". would that be accurate?

like my first impression with this stuff is that at some point vaporwave aesthetics branched off in two directions. on the one hand you have the chill beats to study to branch, ie accessible party music & downtempo that's heavy on iconic sample loops. on the other hand you have this stuff which seems to have siezed upon the "internet" aspect that was always inherent to vaporwave, ie the underlying thematic once you got past the sampling, the exploration of the way in which the web take every previously existing aesthetic and melts them together into this cotton candy mutation. disregarding all previously established tastes as an experiment to see what new tastes might emerge

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15 minutes ago, Cryptowen said:

its interesting how low res cgi graphics back in the day used to signal "futuristic", whereas when i see it on stuff from the last decade my read is "the uncanny contained within the mundane". would that be accurate?

like my first impression with this stuff is that at some point vaporwave aesthetics branched off in two directions. on the one hand you have the chill beats to study to branch, ie accessible party music & downtempo that's heavy on iconic sample loops. on the other hand you have this stuff which seems to have siezed upon the "internet" aspect that was always inherent to vaporwave, ie the underlying thematic once you got past the sampling, the exploration of the way in which the web take every previously existing aesthetic and melts them together into this cotton candy mutation. disregarding all previously established tastes as an experiment to see what new tastes might emerge

i dont know if its possible to analyze niche music in objective ways because of the differing viewpoints depending on generations and associations between types of imagery and sounds.  theoretically i guess you could build a dependency graph mapping the influences that artists listened to and how much of it was contained in their specific output.  i think the goal is to avoid categorization.  i used to have dumb ideas about how music was all done to death and other stupid stuff but when i listen to random genres i never knew about before this goes out the window and i have pretty big hopes that music can continue to evolve forever into the future. the parameter space is near infinite.  i think this can all go much further, even these genres.  easy to just say though. just my ramble

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6 minutes ago, cyanobacteria said:

they really are good.  they also exposed die antwoord as weird pedo rapists:

 

 

alleged assault

btw... imo the music is best on mute. reaches deeper! 

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  • 1 month later...

I really like a lot of things that have come out of the general "Hyperpop" sphere, if only for its artistic influence and how a lot of it feels like it's taking ownership of feelings that music that the producers (who are close to my cohort) shared when they heard the same electronic I grew up on. Maybe different for me being in the western states, but a lot of permeated was tied to video games or the Eurodance hits that would break into radio play. It comes across as a deconstruction and done with such a hyperfocus on meeting a certain aesthetic that I end up appreciating it, even if it's either taking itself too seriously or not at all (often hard to discern). One of my younger friends, that I met being confined to my room during my college years playing video games until the sun came back up and I would have to rush to get my school work done before catching public transit to my lectures, knowing full well I wouldn't be home again until after closing shop at 11 pm, was sending me early Hannah Diamond tracks and talking about it. I didn't think much of it sounded good, kind of like they were all unfinished demo tracks. 

I can't help but feel like some of this is like a(n) (more) electronic response to Death Grips. A lot of "interesting" min-max going on in the soundscape, maybe a weird comparison. It feels like there's a lot of talent in this production that's not set on chasing money and more set on chasing an idea, which I appreciate.

I've been listening to a lot of Danny Harle (a producer in the early years of the PC Music collective), and he absolutely grabs the evocation of what I remember feeling when I first started hearing techno tracks that resonated with me. It really throws me back into being a tween and loving this stuff, feeling like a complete nerd-loser-outcast playing DDR in my bedroom because I wasn't allowed to have friends over when my parent wasn't home during my latchkey bullshit years with Dirty Vegas, Groove Armada, Ace of Base, BT, and Eiffel 65. Uniquely it completely avoids all the feelings that Daft Punk gave me in those formative years; prior to my delving into more experimental music that eventually led me here. I'm going to take this little moment here to say the Super Monkey Ball 2 soundtrack is full of nothing but breakbeat bangers, hot damn.

The whimsy, chasing the nostalgia, really feels to have come out of the Vaporwave movement. I remember people wondering if early PC Music could still be considered vaporwave.

 

I remember getting sent this awhile back, and it's not good (my opinion), but boy does it feel like a proto version of a lot of this, this is the shitpost part of my post (though there are a few good tracks in here).

 

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Yep as someone quoted PC music and AG Cook is related to this stuff, in recent years until now some teens joined the tendency and besides vaporwave, created an interesting culture based on a digital world that we're currently living on. Im not an expert but guessing that to this style will happen the same as others, incoming good and bad stuff. In my case I listened sporadic times planet 1999 and hannah diamond

PD: @xyrofen

seems that you read my mind, you described pretty well the hyperpop culture, congrats!

Edited by Diurn
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7 hours ago, Diurn said:

Yep as someone quoted PC music and AG Cook is related to this stuff, in recent years until now some teens joined the tendency and besides vaporwave, created an interesting culture based on a digital world that we're currently living on. Im not an expert but guessing that to this style will happen the same as others, incoming good and bad stuff. In my case I listened sporadic times planet 1999 and hannah diamond

PD: @xyrofen

seems that you read my mind, you described pretty well the hyperpop culture, congrats!

I'm a very quintessential millenial that grew up on the internet, stuck in a house on a cul-de-sac because my parents were convinced, and thus so was I, that I would be kidnapped or subject to violence on the rough streets of an Oregonian suburb. Ipso facto I lived on a PSX, Gameboy Color, and eMachine with classic games of that era, edutainment (remember this?), Napster, and Toonami.

I'm glad I could summarize it in a way that you agree with. It makes the world feel more connected.

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