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Free Audio Software for Windows/MacOS


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2 hours ago, rek said:

it can consume a whole core of your cpu during operation.

You can monitor that pretty well now, it's been a couple years since it was as minimal as it used to be.  It still doesn't let you monitor the laod per core directly, but it's close enough to give you a good idea. 

Anyway, I mistyped.  It's about 1.2% realtime CPU and 16% total CPU, which is the opposite of what I usually get.

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5 hours ago, TubularCorporation said:

You can monitor that pretty well now, it's been a couple years since it was as minimal as it used to be.  It still doesn't let you monitor the laod per core directly, but it's close enough to give you a good idea. 

Anyway, I mistyped.  It's about 1.2% realtime CPU and 16% total CPU, which is the opposite of what I usually get.

here's an example of what I mean, i just quickly threw together a midi loop with a bunch of random notes on the init preset, and the numbers seem to look kinder in Reaper than in HTOP. nothing else but Reaper running, mostly. There's an option in DSPEMU in the upper left corner that says "report true cpu usage" or something. but i leave it at default, seems to work better. but there's a hidden cpu tax with this one.

dspemu_htop_vs_reaper.jpg

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Do you have anticipative effects turned on in Reaper's buffer setup page? That makes a huge difference.  Like, under 10% CPU without spikes vs. 80%-120% with spikes above 200% for the same project depending on whether it's on or not. The older computer I use for recording is almost unusable without it and can handle low three figure track counts with it.  I ask because one of the big differences is how consistent the CPU load is with it on, that could be the difference we're seeing, if it isn't that we're using different operating systems.

 

I do wish Reaper let you directly monitor the load per core.

 

Anyway, this is what i got.  The dropoff in the Process Explorer grapsh are where I stopped the sequencer, to give a reference to idle.  Also, in the third image, the spikes up to 40% CPU in Reaper are when I opened Irfanview to paste and save the second screenshot.  I also had some similar spikes when I had Process Explorer running alongside Reaper for the first screenshot, but those didn't happen when only Reaper was running.  With reaper alone I was getting a pretty consistent 16%-18%/0.7c-0.8c CPU load, with occasional spikes up to 1.0c-1.5c when Process Explorer or Irfanview were also running, but not with Reaper alone. 

image.jpeg.99c0ef36641ef82ba4c14bc4ea0abe84.jpeg

image.jpeg.387ab13d52c2d6b621f5f7d10fe613f0.jpeg

image.jpeg.2e9a22b44da127eaf5c1a5b9f64e87cb.jpeg

Edited by TubularCorporation
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On 9/5/2022 at 2:13 PM, TubularCorporation said:

Do you have anticipative effects turned on in Reaper's buffer setup page? That makes a huge difference.  Like, under 10% CPU without spikes vs. 80%-120% with spikes above 200% for the same project depending on whether it's on or not. The older computer I use for recording is almost unusable without it and can handle low three figure track counts with it.  I ask because one of the big differences is how consistent the CPU load is with it on, that could be the difference we're seeing, if it isn't that we're using different operating systems.

 

good question, I'm usin' Linux with Yabridge to run win dlls. I've both used Anticipative Effects and not, in a trial and error process to get the best functionality. Just checked now and it's disabled, but it's running relatively well at the moment. been struggling for many moons to find a sweet spot, trying and untrying every combination of settings. The creator of Yabridge recommended to try disabling it. I spent time dong stress tests with DSP56300 , loading a bunch of instances with lots of voices running, and seeing how long it took to choke the audio output buffers, and got better performance from anticipative effects, but running win dll's on linux introduces its own kind of problems that caused a lot of lockups and crashes that have currently went away for me as a result of disabling the feature, in my particular case.

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  • 3 weeks later...

apparently design by Aphex. 

Samplebrain

A custom sample mashing app designed by Aphex Twin.

Samplebrain chops samples up into a 'brain' of interconnected small sections called blocks which are connected into a network by similarity. It processes a target sample, chopping it up into blocks in the same way, and tries to match each block with one in it's brain to play in realtime.

This allows you to interpret a sound with a different one. As we worked on it (during 2015 and 2016) we gradually added more and more tweakable parameters until it became slightly out of control.

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after about 1 year relying on this to bypass my macbook's thermal throttling inferno, I can safely say this is maybe the most crucial of finds in terms of audio. if you're an irresponsible twat like me and like to fuck around with Acustica Audio or any other CPU intensive plugins you might want to give it a go. it absolutely saved my life. it's also free

it allows you to unlock multi-thread on any DAW or you can use it to resurrect old machines as high-performing slaves

https://audiogridder.com/

AudioGridder Server runs on a computer hosting your effect and instrument plugins. On your workstation, on which you run your DAW, you use the AudioGridder FX or instrument plugin to access your plugin library over the network. The plugin is looking for available servers on your network and once connected allows you to create insert chains or load instruments. Midi and audio data from your DAW will be streamed over the network, processed on the server and streamed back.

I made a facebook group where there's a pretty decent amount of information on troubleshooting, optimal setups, etc. look it up

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17 hours ago, ignatius said:

apparently design by Aphex. 

Samplebrain

A custom sample mashing app designed by Aphex Twin.

Samplebrain chops samples up into a 'brain' of interconnected small sections called blocks which are connected into a network by similarity. It processes a target sample, chopping it up into blocks in the same way, and tries to match each block with one in it's brain to play in realtime.

This allows you to interpret a sound with a different one. As we worked on it (during 2015 and 2016) we gradually added more and more tweakable parameters until it became slightly out of control.

interesting, I'd like to see Ned Rush do a demo.

and in other news, Matt Tytel just made Vital 1.5 public.

 

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