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The new Clive Barker is shockingly bad. Read up on it afterwards and it seems the original manuscript was over twice as many pages. That's exactly what it reads like. Stripped of all nuance, forced exposition, terrible dialogue, plot threads introduced early on that are never mentioned again (and presumably were in the bits that were cut)

 

Reads like teen fiction or The Famous Five Go To Hell.

 

Still not got around to getting hold of the last (so far) Ice and Fire book so gonna read Dune next to satisfy my 'book with fantasy map at the start' cravings.

I've never read any Clive Barker, but I did hear that last one was getting panned by everyone.

 

First time reading Dune?

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The Owl Service - It fizzles out at the end but otherwise lovely folk horror set in the Welsh valleys, give it a go if hauntology is your cup of tea.

 

Can't type for shit and only had a couple, what's happening?

Edited by tec
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Yup, finally getting around to it. Had the book sitting here for a few years.

 

Early Barker is fucking lush, read Books of Blood, Weaveworld and The Great and Secret Show.

 

I love those, but I also loved his 2001 novel Coldheart Canyon.

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finally finished up dostoyevsky’s ‘the idoit’, & found that despite the obvious brilliance of its author, his tense tragicomedy iz an endurance test of shakespearean melodrama. shit was a long read, & all the characters were p annoying yet glad 2 hav red it lol. the plot's roller coasting unpredictability is liek a louis ck or lynch miniseries script, &, funnily enough, the novel’s insight into the human condition was apparently inspiration enough for tarkovsky 2 consider filmy the confusing, ambitious, challenging story. 7/10

 

now rereedy:

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Finished The Name Of The Rose by Umberto Eco there, great stuff. Dude knows his medieval culture/history.

 

Baudolino is great for that stuff as well, he goes even further down the rabbit hole in that one - based around the time of the Holy Roman Empire and the myth of the Kingdom of Prester John.

 

 

Lush, I'll check it out!

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The Owl Service - It fizzles out at the end but otherwise lovely folk horror set in the Welsh valleys, give it a go if hauntology is your cup of tea.

 

i've been slowly working my way through the tv series. have you seen it? it's very bizarre in how it's made incorporating experimental filmmaking with a sort of dreamy folk narrative.

 

 

i'm curious if the books explain where the plates with the owl patterns came from, and whether there is a part that explains a mural they find on the walls of the house they're vacationing at

 

 

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read the back and picked this up immediately. i have a slight fascination with the yakuza (mostly bōsōzoku) so this immediately fascinated me especially considering how the cute the author is

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The Owl Service - It fizzles out at the end but otherwise lovely folk horror set in the Welsh valleys, give it a go if hauntology is your cup of tea.

 

i've been slowly working my way through the tv series. have you seen it? it's very bizarre in how it's made incorporating experimental filmmaking with a sort of dreamy folk narrative.

 

 

i'm curious if the books explain where the plates with the owl patterns came from, and whether there is a part that explains a mural they find on the walls of the house they're vacationing at

 

 

 

I hadn't planned to but if you think it's worth a watch I'll give it a crack. Yeah it goes into the backstory a little, it leaves bits up to your imagination which is refreshing and kinda cool for something that is for children too.

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^^ i definitely think it's worth watching (you can increase the recommendation by factor of 5000 if you've read the books) since alan garner wrote the script. also, this was granada's first show to be shot all on location (in wales) but it's not shot like a television show but rather like an experimental film that's edited into different episodes- and for a (kids?) show some scenes are pretty scary.

 

btw: the shows music sounds like it was done by the focus group

 

i still have maybe 3 more episodes to watch but i'm hoping they explain where the plates came from (so far, only the legend has been given)

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^^ i definitely think it's worth watching (you can increase the recommendation by factor of 5000 if you've read the books) since alan garner wrote the script. also, this was granada's first show to be shot all on location (in wales) but it's not shot like a television show but rather like an experimental film that's edited into different episodes- and for a (kids?) show some scenes are pretty scary.

 

btw: the shows music sounds like it was done by the focus group

 

i still have maybe 3 more episodes to watch but i'm hoping they explain where the plates came from (so far, only the legend has been given)

 

Sweet, sold on the music alone! I'll try and track it down.

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“Eliza and Ezra rolled together into the one giggling snowball of full-figured copulation, screaming and shouting as they playfully bit and pulled at each other in a dangerous and clamorous rollercoaster coil of sexually violent rotation with Eliza’s breasts barrel-rolled across Ezra’s howling mouth and the pained frenzy of his bulbous salutation extenuating his excitement as it smacked its way into every muscle of Eliza’s body except for the otherwise central zone.”

 

Excerpt from Morrissey's debut novel ^

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“Eliza and Ezra rolled together into the one giggling snowball of full-figured copulation, screaming and shouting as they playfully bit and pulled at each other in a dangerous and clamorous rollercoaster coil of sexually violent rotation with Eliza’s breasts barrel-rolled across Ezra’s howling mouth and the pained frenzy of his bulbous salutation extenuating his excitement as it smacked its way into every muscle of Eliza’s body except for the otherwise central zone.”

 

Excerpt from Morrissey's debut novel ^

 

 

<does morty face

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  • 2 weeks later...

Almost done with Radio Free Albemuth

 

more coherant than Valis which I need to reread since I only made it half way through last time round. PKD pumping on all the good pistons for sure. Will be watching the film afterward.

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  • 2 weeks later...

What's the general consensus on Edgar Allan Poe? Just finished the first volume of a complete short stories compendium and don't feel like reading the second one tbh, feel like I've already read all the good ones

 

really? i read the penguin popular classics compilation and i really loved it. some of the tales were a bit odd, such as the duc de l'omelette or monos and una, but the rest was classic.

 

which ones have you read?

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What's the general consensus on Edgar Allan Poe? Just finished the first volume of a complete short stories compendium and don't feel like reading the second one tbh, feel like I've already read all the good ones

 

really? i read the penguin popular classics compilation and i really loved it. some of the tales were a bit odd, such as the duc de l'omelette or monos and una, but the rest was classic.

 

which ones have you read?

 

 

I think I posted a number of weeks ago, I'm reading Cortazar's translation/edition. He arranged the tales thematically so all the horror/paranormal ones are at the beginning, a whole lot of them, which I really enjoyed, highlights being the Eleonora/Morella/Berenice trilogy, the Usher house one, Metzengerstein... All of them were pretty good really

 

But then came the metaphysical tales/dialogues, which read like a load of crap imo, not really interested in pseudo-philosophy (talking about Monos and Una, Eiros and Charmion, etc). Now I'm making my way through the "analytical" ones: the golden bug & the morgue house ones, which are pretty formulaic and kind of... I dunno, it's like reading a puzzle from a math games magazine instead of an actual piece of literature, so I'm struggling to continue. I guess it's understandable considering the period this was written in, it's like proto-Dan Brown or something

 

Then volume 2's themes are 'explorations about the past and the future', 'contemplative tales', 'grotesque' and finally his attempts at satire, none of which I'm really interested in tbh

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