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Stephen Baxter's Raft. Good so far.

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On 6/14/2019 at 11:08 PM, splbt said:

^ been thinking of re-reading blood meridian as i read it more as a recommendation than of my own will. good to hear it holds up. was kinda compulsive about reading at that time (and still am, i suppose) and didn't really let myself enjoy it

broke my no-long-books spree and picked up the second volume of the man without qualities AND infinite jest at the same time. don't know if i am to laugh or cry

Wahey, I picked up a cheapo Infinite Jest a couple days ago. Looking forward to another run through. I think it tops my list of most viscerally '90s books (that same weird parallel reality feeling I get from Ventolin-era Aphex, kinda).

Did a bunch of Don Quixote this week but then I found my old copy of Giles Goat Boy & got distracted

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On 6/15/2019 at 1:08 AM, splbt said:

^ been thinking of re-reading blood meridian as i read it more as a recommendation than of my own will. good to hear it holds up. was kinda compulsive about reading at that time (and still am, i suppose) and didn't really let myself enjoy it

Been meaning to read that and McCarthy in general, the history of that part of North America - the deserts of the SW US and North Mexico - is fascinating - it's still very vast, hellish, and remote AF but kind of beautiful for that reason as well. I'm reading a book about the Republic of Texas and I'm only now really appreciating just how not just brutal aspects of it's history were but also how bare bones and rough the settlements were for a good part of a century. I had a pretty comprehensive idea of the history of the state but it's often through this romanticized lens that doesn't reflect the stark reality of it's history.

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51z6R9SG4ZL._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

interesting overview of "the scene" although for whatever reason, the writers are reluctant to name group names despite giving you enough details to just wiki who they're talking about. that becomes a little annoying since you have to keep going back and forth to get better betwix book and .net to get more details

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finished down and out in Paris and London by Orwell.

reading David Graeber's book on debt, thoroughly enjoying. also reading The Master and Margarita before bed/whenever I feel like fiction and its a really good read.

On 6/27/2019 at 12:06 PM, Nebraska said:

51z6R9SG4ZL._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

interesting overview of "the scene" although for whatever reason, the writers are reluctant to name group names despite giving you enough details to just wiki who they're talking about. that becomes a little annoying since you have to keep going back and forth to get better betwix book and .net to get more details

why on earth would they do that lmao

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also i tried to read Blood Meridian earlier this year but I genuinely think it triggered a depressive episode. the book is fucking gruelling.

Edited by MadellisTheSixth

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18 minutes ago, MadellisTheSixth said:

finished down and out in Paris and London by Orwell.

reading David Graeber's book on debt, thoroughly enjoying. also reading The Master and Margarita before bed/whenever I feel like fiction and its a really good read.

Both (Graeber and The Master and Margarita) are excellent. Really enjoyed them ( for different reasons, obviously). 

The first half of the twentieth century has been very unkind to Russians, but damn did it make them produce a lot of good writing.

I’m currently reading The Twelve Chairs by Ilya Ilf and Jevgeni Petrov, also from roughly the same period. It’s about the antics of a former nobleman who tries to hunt down twelve chairs (hence the title) that were confiscated from him after the Revolution. Very entertaining.

 

 

 

 

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Graeber's other joint Bullshit Jobs is also q good.

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Finished Lem's Fiasco. The inundation with real and imaginary science was a bit much but otherwise it had some interesting ideas and imagery. 

Now reading some PKD as a palate cleanser. 

 

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I read Blood Meridian about a decade ago when I was bingeing on McCarthy. It’s the kind of book that I’m glad I read but won’t revisit for probably another decade. Same with a lot of McCarthy -  they stay with you for a long long time.  Child of God is another one of his that sticks in the brain. 

I’m reading Ballard’s short stories at the moment.  Hit and miss for me but mostly hit. He has a gift for playing with jargon and when he gets the tone right it’s brilliant. 

Master and Margarita: haven’t read it in many years - isn’t there a scene at the end where one of the clownish characters is revealed to be solemn knight in his true form?

Edited by petsim

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6 hours ago, petsim said:

I’m reading Ballard’s short stories at the moment.  Hit and miss for me but mostly hit. He has a gift for playing with jargon and when he gets the tone right it’s brilliant. 

One of many reasons I admire Ballard is that he does straightforward SF stories & fragmentary antinarrative pieces equally artfully. Also the fact that just hearing/reading his name instantly fills my mind's eye with glassy sand dunes & skeletal skyscrapers—the man painted with a truly magic palette of imagery.

Gonna borrow Alan Moore's Voice of the Fire (pretty sure that's the title) from my brother tomorrow; gave it to him a few years back but never actually read it myself.

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13 hours ago, doorjamb said:

One of many reasons I admire Ballard is that he does straightforward SF stories & fragmentary antinarrative pieces equally artfully. Also the fact that just hearing/reading his name instantly fills my mind's eye with glassy sand dunes & skeletal skyscrapers—the man painted with a truly magic palette of imagery.

What would you recommend? I read High Rise a while back and really enjoyed it, but then I tried to read some of his short stories - I vaguely remember one about music therapy for plants - and was pretty bored.

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High Rise is one of a 'thematic trilogy'. The other two are Concrete Island and Crash. Read them.

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Went on a Ballard binge around a decade ago, liked most of it, but found Crash all but unreadable. The mid-20th century avant garde has not aged well. Luckily most of his other work has, so I'm not complaining.

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I’ve read High Rise and Concrete Island - both excellent. I like this kind of “mundane” speculative fiction: making the commonplace or humdrum surreal/alienating.

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Crash unreadable?!

image.png.2056c153e9cb5a7ca5e553fbfdedd9df.png

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13 hours ago, petsim said:

I’ve read High Rise and Concrete Island - both excellent. I like this kind of “mundane” speculative fiction: making the commonplace or humdrum surreal/alienating.

Yes that's exactly what I liked about High Rise. Sounds like Concrete Island is the next one I should check out.

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Yeah that’s a really good one.

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Was the first Ballard I ever read. After reading WIll Self writing about it, gushingly.

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On 7/7/2019 at 12:33 PM, hello spiral said:

Crash unreadable?!

image.png.2056c153e9cb5a7ca5e553fbfdedd9df.png

*all but*

Repetitive, formless and overly descriptive.

 

Quote

As she peered through the window at Vaughan's camera her canny eyes were clearly aware of his real interest in her. The posture of her hands on the steering wheel and accelerator treadle, the unhealthy fingers pointing back towards her breasts, were elements in some stylized masturbatory rite. Her strong face with its unmatching planes seemed to mimic the deformed panels of the car, almost as if she consciously realized that these twisted instrument binnacles provided a readily accessible anthology of depraved acts, the keys to an alternative sexuality. I stared at the photographs in the harsh light. Without thinking, I visualized a series of imaginary pictures I might take of her: in various sexual acts, her legs supported by sections of complex machine tools, pulleys and trestles; with her physical education instructor, coaxing this conventional young man into the new parameters of her body, developing a sexual expertise that would be an exact analogue of the other skills created by the multiplying technologies of the twentieth century. Thinking of the extensor rictus of her spine during orgasm, the erect hairs on her undermuscled thighs, I stared at the stylized manufacturer's medallion visible in the photographs, the contoured flanks of the window pillars.

 

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Whilst I was reading it I had a scooter and drove all over London, I knew the city like the inside of my tiny house, but there’s areas which still seemed difficult to reach. I did write below the Westway comes to mind but a simple google search has shown strong evidence this is what Ballard had in mind. It’s really not difficult to imagine such a place existing.

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On 6/30/2019 at 9:38 PM, rhmilo said:

Both (Graeber and The Master and Margarita) are excellent. Really enjoyed them ( for different reasons, obviously). 

The first half of the twentieth century has been very unkind to Russians, but damn did it make them produce a lot of good writing.

I’m currently reading The Twelve Chairs by Ilya Ilf and Jevgeni Petrov, also from roughly the same period. It’s about the antics of a former nobleman who tries to hunt down twelve chairs (hence the title) that were confiscated from him after the Revolution. Very entertaining.

 

 

 

 

that sounds up my alley, ill sus. thanks!

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On 7/9/2019 at 2:23 AM, rhmilo said:

*all but*

Repetitive, formless and overly descriptive.

 

 

:cums tho:

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