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Interview with Sean Booth


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What do you mean by generative tracks?

 

But looking back to the likes of Confield, where you were well documented as being users of generative software like Max/MSP..

 

...Well, there was only 3 tracks on Confield that had Max sequencing. It’s ironic, I mean Pen Expers was made using a minidisk, like by pausing a DMX drum machine, I could go through the whole album and be really boring. But there’s only 3 tracks on there that are really generative really. It just gets massively overblown because people think it’s dead interesting, but it’s not is it? To me it’s just like a bunch of arpeggiators plugged into each other, going off and we’ve been doing that since Lego Feet days.

 

Thats what I mean. TFTT and GBIII understand it better than I do.

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Generative music is defined by mathematical parameters as far as I understand, usually in a program built around algorithms like Max MSP. From there you can just "play" the track and either program how the parameters will change or adjust parameters on the fly and have the music change.

 

A lot of people argue that this is "random" and not really music as nobody is composing it in a traditional sense, but people overlook the amount of work necessary in creating these patches. I've tried my hand at Max MSP and it is no easy task to make something that doesn't sound like total shit.

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There was this really sweet interview (can't remember for which album) where Sean Booth goes off on the interviewer for calling it random. I wish I could find it again, it was a good read.

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Guest James Fucking Cagney
Pen Expers on a Mini-Disc! And only three of the Confield tracks were with generative techniques? I wonder which ones they are.

 

Hey Ghostbusters, if you read this, what was the track that you found on that disc that you released on your website or whatever?

 

Just by guessing, I am going to say that Bine, Sim Gishel, and Lentic Catachresis are the generative tracks? (and of course Licciflii and the end of Reniform Puls has generative techniques used as well.)

 

I seem to remember an interview where one of the Autechres described the creation of VI Scose Poise, and it was done in a generative fashion, ie they programmed everything and then messed with the values of variables, listened to it, changed some more values, etc, until it was finished.

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Guest blacklightmartin
There was this really sweet interview (can't remember for which album) where Sean Booth goes off on the interviewer for calling it random. I wish I could find it again, it was a good read.

 

Do you mean this one?

 

Martin

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Pen Expers on a Mini-Disc! And only three of the Confield tracks were with generative techniques? I wonder which ones they are.

 

Hey Ghostbusters, if you read this, what was the track that you found on that disc that you released on your website or whatever?

 

Just by guessing, I am going to say that Bine, Sim Gishel, and Lentic Catachresis are the generative tracks? (and of course Licciflii and the end of Reniform Puls has generative techniques used as well.)

 

 

well to start i think the entire confield tour set was done with generative based patches and was probably just raw output from maxmsp the whole tour.

 

I think off Confield the entire first half of the album sounds very deliberate to me and not generative based at all sans maybe some randomized effects going on.

 

6 - bine - the beat definitely has some random based super trigger type thing altering it if not the sequence itself being generative based

9 - Lentic Catachresis - the rolling stutter bass drum is definitely generative based and as the song speeds up in temp to get 2x its speed it reminds me a lot of some of the generative reaktor patches ive made set at 200bpm. Im willing to bet that from about 3mins and on is entirely generative.

 

 

I also think songs like renfiform puls have a lot of generative beat programming going on in them(mostly the end part where it turns kind of mutant jungle). Also this same technique can be heard in the entire song 'nftwa4' Specifically a type of generative beat making which involves a sort of interplay between a bass and snare drum, when i say this i mean say a random 16th note step sequence being generated that only has a choice between a snare and bass hit WITHOUT being able to play both at the same time, this creates almost like a random really complex sounding 'drum and bass' beat.

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Yea, I know for a fact that Draft contained no generative material except for the end of Reniform Puls which has a lot of generative stuff.

 

So i guess it is Vi Scose, Bine, and the end of Lentic.

 

also:

 

SR - Ever take advantage of it?

 

SB - Totally. The whole point of making music is to put something new into the world, you know. To inject a little piece of yourself and the more you can put in there, the more honest you can be with your expression, the better everything is, the more point there is in doing it. You only get one chance, really. Obviously, if we feel like our work is more successful, then we're going to use that to sort of make our work more successful, which is what most people do, to make our work better.

 

AR - What I meant was have you ever released something deliberately shitty?

 

SB - That's the fucking complete opposite of what I'm saying to you. What I'm saying to you is that you get one chance to make an honest expression and you fucking take it.

 

 

 

Sean is so cool.

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There was this really sweet interview (can't remember for which album) where Sean Booth goes off on the interviewer for calling it random. I wish I could find it again, it was a good read.

 

Do you mean this one?

 

Martin

 

Exactly! Thanks.

 

:heart: WATMM

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There was this really sweet interview (can't remember for which album) where Sean Booth goes off on the interviewer for calling it random. I wish I could find it again, it was a good read.

 

Do you mean this one?

 

Martin

I learnt a lot from that interview with Sean, thanks for the link.

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Vi Scose doesnt sound generative to me, at least not in the sense that the rythmic structure was generated. I think there is probably some random granular effects going on in the background, but for the most part its pretty sequenced. I actually think there are some generative based tracks on LP5 also, 10 - Arch Carrier definitely has at the very least a melody built upon a randomly generated melodic sequence. 02 - Pencha on Chichlisuite also sounds like its using a similar concept. They possibly laid down one melodic phrase using a random generator and then made different musical phrases more composed but based on that original random phrase. I also think 04 - Left Blank on EP7 is using something kind of like a mixture between that Liccflii patch and the weird triplety offbeat generative patches they made for confield. Who knows i could be totally wrong about all of this, this is just how it sounds to me.

 

rook, did you hear something else saying that Reniform puls's second half was generative? i was just taking a guess.

Edited by Ghostbusters III
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  • 3 months later...
Yea, I know for a fact that Draft contained no generative material except for the end of Reniform Puls which has a lot of generative stuff.

 

lol

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Guest Super lurker ultra V12
Yea, I know for a fact that Draft contained no generative material except for the end of Reniform Puls which has a lot of generative stuff.

 

lol

 

"There's a lot of maths and generated beats on Confield, but we never considered that album very difficult," asserts Booth. "It's like pop music compared to some of the stuff we had considered putting out! And even when the beats sound like they are moving around in time and space, they're not random. They're based on sets of rules and we have a good handle on them. Draft is really straight, using straight-up normal sequencers and samplers. It's written note by note, where we know exactly what we put on. Only 'Reniform Puls' has some generative stuff, done by Max, which also controls a vocal filter in that track.

 

lunk

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Yea, I know for a fact that Draft contained no generative material except for the end of Reniform Puls which has a lot of generative stuff.

 

lol

 

"There's a lot of maths and generated beats on Confield, but we never considered that album very difficult," asserts Booth. "It's like pop music compared to some of the stuff we had considered putting out! And even when the beats sound like they are moving around in time and space, they're not random. They're based on sets of rules and we have a good handle on them. Draft is really straight, using straight-up normal sequencers and samplers. It's written note by note, where we know exactly what we put on. Only 'Reniform Puls' has some generative stuff, done by Max, which also controls a vocal filter in that track.

 

lunk

 

the lol was directed towards the "i know for a fact": ae production booth/brown/rook.

 

knowing for a fact is a bit of a stretch...

Edited by Alcofribas
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  • 6 years later...

"A note is just a sound played for a different length at a different pitch." :blink: Love it.

 

well, it's the only definition of notes that i know of :unsure:

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QUOTE (Deepex @ Feb 26 2008, 10:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There was this really sweet interview (can't remember for which album) where Sean Booth goes off on the interviewer for calling it random. I wish I could find it again, it was a good read.

 

Do you mean this one?

 

Martin

 

I love this bit. Interview from 2001, and you can tell Sean is getting a bit pissed:

 

"Taste is what defines people, it's what makes us different to software -- we're not software, you can't possibly consider a bit of software to be like a person. It's not 2001 -- I mean, it is, but it's not."

 

toplel!

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