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Classical Music


Capsaicin
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Bach and Mozart are so insanely IDM. Well, actually, they haven't really been matched. They aren't IDM in the traditional sense, there are no electronics of course, unless you're listening to the Carlos reworkings.

 

 

 

No, they are IDM because their sense of structure and sense of perfection reaches almost robotic levels. And when they reach their best, their music has the power of allowing you to sort ofrise into a zen contact with martians. I'm kind of joking, but it's alas dada

 

Hiho

 

Anyway here the deal, listen to thes shit b

 

Bach-Well Tempered Piansa

- Contrupuntus Book Del Perfecto

 

y

 

Mozart - Symphonies 40/41

 

 

I really like the Mozart piano sonatas for a close look at how pretentious my writing is right now, however they are certainly mindblowing in their own right. People write these wonderful composers off, mostly Mozart, because they imagine him as a stuffy/cliche/lame composer.

 

These people are wrong! You have to enter the proper mindset before you enjoy Mozart. This mindset is that you are

 

being treated

 

to perfection. There is no ulterior motive in the greatest Mozart. it's simply pure music being transmitted to you, free of emotion or flaw. It's sound, from the ground up.

 

It is wonderfully calming, since it makes no demands of 'understanding.'

 

 

 

 

The best thing I think is that this doesn't make the music 'dull' or 'easy.' It, in a way, makes it difficult. Because the music does not embellish itself. It's straightforward and pure.

 

 

 

I don't need to post anything here, shit can be found. It's up to the listener who sees this to seek out the proper advice.

 

I would definitely suggest symphony 40 as a starting point, with repeated listens to unlock what the eternal TV set has made it difficult for the modern automaton to detect.

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Mozart was a great melodist, but I personally think he's been matched and surpassed many times. Many people I know and respect disagree with me on this of course... but anyway I feel it's a bit odd to compare composers of different eras with one another. Each new generation seeks to produce something new, the great talents who could have written Mozartian melodies would have been/ currently are preoccupied with art music as it exists in their own time.

 

I sort of agree about Bach though. Morton Feldman asked why nobody but Bach could write a fugue (in the Bach sense of a fugue) and that when other people tried it always turned out too "fugue-y".

Edited by jim
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Guest Ricky Downtown

took an introductory course to classical music this year at the university. here are some of my favorite pieces which we studied:

 

Johann Sebastian Bach - Brandenburg Concerto No. 5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49IOKnhX0Sk

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto, k. 488

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRWXZ_mZygA

 

Ludwig Van Beethoven - String Quartet, op. 135

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD_CRM7IBjg

 

Robert Schumann - Carnaval

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXlH4y7ps4Y

 

Frédéric Chopin - Nocturne op. 15 no. 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEyPCqPnpA8

 

Claude Debussy - "Clouds" from Three Nocturnes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1XSJHTOFAI

 

Béla Bartók - Music For Strings, Percussion, and Celesta

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EG0W5gRl31E

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Mozart was a great melodist, but I personally think he's been matched and surpassed many times. Many people I know and respect disagree with me on this of course... but anyway I feel it's a bit odd to compare composers of different eras with one another. Each new generation seeks to produce something new, the great talents who could have written Mozartian melodies would have been/ currently are preoccupied with art music as it exists in their own time.

 

I sort of agree about Bach though. Morton Feldman asked why nobody but Bach could write a fugue (in the Bach sense of a fugue) and that when other people tried it always turned out too "fugue-y".

 

 

 

Mozart is interesting. Every of the musicians came from their own place, and their music should be understood within those bounds, probably.

 

 

 

 

But Mozart, regarding the melodicism. I just wanted to say, I don't personally care for his melodies, in terms of any traditional idea of a melody as one line going across time or whatever.

 

I listen to his music in a sort of different mind state. Like how some people might listen to Autechre to note the complexities and details going on over the track, I'll listen to Mozart to hear the progression of the structure of what he is doing.

 

I wouldn't necessarily contest that many have done what he did just fine afterwards, including people in his time. But that would probably be because he's my 'go to' and I can't imagine improving on something that is already 'perfect.'

 

Just thoughts though.

 

 

 

 

 

For me, if I'm utterly tired of everything, oftentimes Mozart is the best. Because his music is so devoid of any emotion [in a traditional sense], or artifice. It's just perfect, crystalline. It makes no demands on your heart or soul, unless you want it to. It's just music, pure music. If there ever was music that could be called the 'epitome of what music is,' I personally would designate Mozart with that title.

 

Of course the mind doesn't always just want something that could be potentially without 'humanity' or excitement. So we go to more 'complex' outlets. That's my take on what I've heard, I think it's pretty cool though.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I really love modern classical. I think Ligeti's Etudes for Piano are really essential listening for anyone who hasn't heard. They continue the tradition from Schoenberg, Ravel, Debussy... early 1900s classical piano into the more 'experimental' realm. And they add that mathematical edge. I can't claim to understand the theory yet, totally, but I will someday soon!

example

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qj9QlWltv8s

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  • 1 year later...

I've been mostly listening to the JS Bach pandora station lately. It's great. Bach in general is unbelievable.

I also like Couperin. I find I usually dig other Baroque composers. it mellows me out.

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Guest Shit Attack

dont like most classical music, some of the more modern stuff is cool specially when you can find recordings the composer's conducted or recorded themselves

 

 

 

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Guest aussie

There are some great recommendations listed in the posts above.

 

I'd also highly recommend the soundtrack from the 1991 French film,

“Tous les matins du monde”. Jordi Savall's viola playing on that album is exquisite.

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  • 4 months later...

there is a song called "ghosts" or something along that line, which i heard a year or two ago - i can't for the life of me remember the artist name and google isn't helping. anyone?

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Piano

 

Chopin - The 14 Waltzes

Antonin Dvorjak - Mazurka Op. 56

Both are able to put forth a lot of emotion, but not get too serious. They make for good casual listens.

Try to get ahold of the the album Czech Piano Music. It features music from several Czech composers. Smetana is another good Czech.

If you want to hear something ridiculously technical find some Alkan. While it's extremely impressive, there's not as much emotion as I'd desire.

Philip Glass's Etudes For Piano is nice. So is Leyland Kirby's Sadly the Future is no Longer What it Was (In particular "When We Parted, My Heart Wanted to Die (Friedrichshain Memories)" and "Not as She Is Now but as She Appears in My Dreams").

And, my all-time favorite, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Morceaux (18) for piano, Op. 72. My recordings are by Michael Ponti, though I dislike the tempo he plays a couple of songs (but I have no complaints with his interpretation of the Morceaux 18.

 

Not Piano

 

Of course, Beethoven's 7th and 9th Symphonies (Movement 2 on both of them are my favorites. Especially 7's movement 2).

Antonio Vivaldi's

-Concerto No 8 in A Minor (L'estro Armonico)

-Concerto in B Minor, Op. 3/10 (L'estro Armonico)

-The Four Seasons

The best Baroque pieces in my opinion. Especially Concerto No 8.

Both of Clara Rockmore's albums are fantastic.

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Alexander Scriabin is the greatest music composer of all time (in my current opinion)

 

Here's one of his more well known pieces. One of my favs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RwdHs756l4

 

 

Here's a long piece, IDM as fuck, mainly around the middle but whole thing needs to be listened to for full effect. I'm sure you're all quite good at that anyway. Current favorite piece of music ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvc2K_5JWho

 

This man deserves a serious sit down listen. Here are some other random good ones as well for anyone who's interested. He invented the "mystic chord" and dissonant and atonal musical system.

 

 

Edited by Zeffolia
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Guest HerculesCzar

^ This is great! I'd never listened to him before. Thanks!

 

Here's one of my favorite Charles Ives piano pieces played by the composer:

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