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So lets analyse Richards Studio


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I wish Mr James would put out some of his experimental vintage twiddlings say under a silly alias on Rephlex so the fanboys wont get in a mardy because it doesn't sound like Drukqs but the analogue geeks can hapily masturbate over knowing only the man himself purveys synthesizers of this fine quality

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I wish Mr James would put out some of his experimental vintage twiddlings say under a silly alias on Rephlex so the fanboys wont get in a mardy because it doesn't sound like Drukqs but the analogue geeks can hapily masturbate over knowing only the man himself purveys synthesizers of this fine quality

 

What, again?

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he owns everything you can rob quite a lot of cool shit frm his house if you take a backpack steinvord is cubase+reaktor on a asda cheap brand laptop

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its part of the speaker for the GX1 of which I remember Mr James was on some synth mailing list asking SOS's Gordon Reid about a replacement as they are the only two lucky buggers known to own one in the uk

 

http://www.soundonso...s/yamahagx1.htm

 

Technically, I believe the GX-1 was designed to work with TX-IIs. These are pretty top of the range, with a woofer, four squawkers and four tweeters, but no Leslie-style rotation. Having said that, the GX-1 will work with any Electone cabinet model. I believe the speaker in the video is a Yamaha RA-200 or RA-200R. (There's also at least one other model in the series, the RA-100, but that only has two rotary speakers, not three, so it's not the one in the video).

 

Not that any of this matters because there are plenty of synthesisers that sound great which are much more affordable, lighter, smaller, easier to maintain, and easier to integrate with the rest of a modern studio. :D The GX-1 and even the CS-80 (while we're talking about flagship Yamaha models) sound like they're very expressive and versatile, but more hassle than they're worth given how hard it would be to find a technician who can repair them or, say, retrofit MIDI into them... although it sounds like RDJ managed to find someone to do the latter somehow, so good for him.

 

If you got any more GX-1s into the UK, this small island would sink under the weight!

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...or it's a Yamaha R-60B, which definitely is in the Electone range. Although it's really not important, and far too close to the world of organs for my liking, even if it does happen to hook up to technically one of the best synthesisers ever made. I guess it's another marketing issue, make a fantastic synthesiser and market it is being a bit like an organ.

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...or it's a Yamaha R-60B, which definitely is in the Electone range. Although it's really not important, and far too close to the world of organs for my liking, even if it does happen to hook up to technically one of the best synthesisers ever made. I guess it's another marketing issue, make a fantastic synthesiser and market it is being a bit like an organ.

If you have time and some soldering skills there is a great modification guide for the Yamaha E-70 written by Marc Brasse. It adds rotary pots to the synth parameters (osc, filter, env, etc). I picked one up locally for $500, which I think is fairly standard. Sometimes you can find them for free, as people just want to get the 300lb beasts out of their homes.

You essentially get 2 preset polyphonic synthesizers, a monophonic 2 octive bass synth and a wonderfully lofi preset rhythm machine before modding.

It sound really great! Although the oscillators are technically not analogue, but a sort of early wavetable type of synthesis, they sound really vast.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5q91MT5320&feature=related

Edited by DerWaschbar
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  • 8 years later...

Necromancing this thread because I always wondered whether he used Notator or Cubase, given those were the two main MIDI sequencers on the Atari ST in the early 90s...  And it turned out (at least for Analogue Bubblebath 3 opener .215061) it was neither.  There was a more obscure MIDI sequencer on the Atari ST called Dr. T's Tiger, and he used the cut down version of that, Tiger Cub.

On 12/1/2011 at 10:32 AM, noise said:

a toaster

You joke, but I happened to use a toaster in my last track...  Hell, I'm listening to .000890569 right now, and that starts off with a vacuum cleaner...

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/10/2020 at 2:23 AM, ZoeB said:

Necromancing this thread because I always wondered whether he used Notator or Cubase, given those were the two main MIDI sequencers on the Atari ST in the early 90s...  And it turned out (at least for Analogue Bubblebath 3 opener .215061) it was neither.  There was a more obscure MIDI sequencer on the Atari ST called Dr. T's Tiger, and he used the cut down version of that, Tiger Cub.

You joke, but I happened to use a toaster in my last track...  Hell, I'm listening to .000890569 right now, and that starts off with a vacuum cleaner...

i've always been so curious about what his exact setup was for those early records (SAW 85-92, Sine waves, etc)

as far as I know its Atari ST, DX100, casio fz-10, sh101, quadraverb, and roland r8 w/808 card for drums recorded to cassette tape 

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