Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hostiles 

Instant favorite. I don't get the scathing criticism this drew, but I didn't read that much into the political implications... It's an exciting ride with good characters and wonderful hammy acting. Everything gets picked apart at the bone nowadays. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 17.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Groundhog Day is great Mulholland Drive is great The Thing is great Inception is garbage  

This movie is full of amazing hidden visual gags. Really like it.

Mon Oncle (1958)

Posted Images

satanico-pandemonium.jpg

bizarre nunsploitation from mexico about a nun who's sexual urges are awakened by images of satan. the frustration and confusion of her sins mixed in with the strict cloistered environment lead her into a kind of mixed pandemonium of day dreams where she's no longer sure what's real and what might be in her own mind. 

this is where the filmmakers had a great idea- but clearly not nearly enough einsteins to pull it off (tech or script wise)- resulting in a rather interesting piece of cinema that's part surreal and a whole lot of b-grade cinema.

the end dance/chant scene reminds me a lot of fellini or passolini except the treatment clearly lacks the artistic finesse of those directors- so this ends, predictably, how it begins

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay & Silent Bob Reboot was a depressing experience. I've always had a soft spot for the world of Clerks/Jay & Silent Bob, but there was absolutely no redeeming elements in this.

Spoiler

except for the grilled chicken joint being named Cock Smoker ^^ 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ye2qX2KvIuEWhFDO6o95xDGjGVsfkhDLofI3aySb

despite having died in the last film, ilsa is somehow still alive- and this time in the middle east (palm springs)- acting as a harem keeper for a corrupt sheik running a human slave auction business. hot on her heels is an american senator (?) and his henry kissinger side-kick who ends up being the butt of many a homosexual inspired jokes (sometimes involving minors) whilst the main dude forcefully beds our main gal as her two lesbo henchwomen remove a guys testicles during a fight.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

^I remember seeing one of those Ilse films at a video rental shop when I was a kid and  being fascinated by the cover. Never got round to watching it, are they any good? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought this might be timely to revisit, hadn't seen it since the 2000s and it still holds up.  Rory Cochrane is in LA, and terrorist fears of a dirty bomb attack turn out to be a killer virus.  Low budget, but well done.  

IMG_2628.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah midsommar was incredibly dumb. a lot of this new wave of horror films that are supposed to be smart and good bc they deal with “issues” or whatever are actually p stupid imo

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/9/2020 at 1:05 PM, ooqpoo said:

^I remember seeing one of those Ilse films at a video rental shop when I was a kid and  being fascinated by the cover. Never got round to watching it, are they any good? 

if you like exploitation, then the first one is recommended as it's notorious for firing up the nazisploitation genre. the other 2 will depend on whether or not you fancy the main dame and her dominating presence 

Link to post
Share on other sites

4111_1-69-dimensions-69-x-102-cm-affiche

i seem to remember enjoying this film when i first watched it, but viewing it again today was a sobering experience. the director seems to have completely missed the point of using made when kubrick used 'also sprach zarathustra'- as significant moments in earth's history brought about by contact with the monolith, but also a catalyst of significant change in whoever has contact with said object. 

this director uses it as a calling card to link his film to the previous one. remember 2001? this is part 2. 

after that there are some wild constrictions of time and leaps of imagination. one scientist (in the middle of the cold war) asks a government aid to lie to the president so he can accompany a russian space mission to jupiter to recover the ship from the previous movie. he tells his wife during dinner that he is leaving and there is a very high probability that he will never return. she runs to the kitchen and slams a dish down. besides 1 bedroom scene, we never see her again. i'm assuming she dies, but who knows-

our main guy writes her regularly, but his letters seem more like mission logs with complex and (possibly?) sensitive mission directives. is/was his wife a scientist too? 
 

how did they manage to fsck up an arthur c clarke story- especially when the director was basically communicating with the author on a daily basis? whatever- he ended up doing films with jean-claude van damme which is- frankly- more his speed than anything like this.

nice try i guess?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Nebraska said:

4111_1-69-dimensions-69-x-102-cm-affiche

i seem to remember enjoying this film when i first watched it, but viewing it again today was a sobering experience. the director seems to have completely missed the point of using made when kubrick used 'also sprach zarathustra'- as significant moments in earth's history brought about by contact with the monolith, but also a catalyst of significant change in whoever has contact with said object. 

this director uses it as a calling card to link his film to the previous one. remember 2001? this is part 2. 

after that there are some wild constrictions of time and leaps of imagination. one scientist (in the middle of the cold war) asks a government aid to lie to the president so he can accompany a russian space mission to jupiter to recover the ship from the previous movie. he tells his wife during dinner that he is leaving and there is a very high probability that he will never return. she runs to the kitchen and slams a dish down. besides 1 bedroom scene, we never see her again. i'm assuming she dies, but who knows-

our main guy writes her regularly, but his letters seem more like mission logs with complex and (possibly?) sensitive mission directives. is/was his wife a scientist too? 
 

how did they manage to fsck up an arthur c clarke story- especially when the director was basically communicating with the author on a daily basis? whatever- he ended up doing films with jean-claude van damme which is- frankly- more his speed than anything like this.

nice try i guess?

That happened to me too. When I first saw it I'd recently read the series and this was the best book in the series for mine. I also had a soft spot for Peter Hyams genre work at that time. So whilst it obviously couldn't compare to 2001, I found it a respectable continuation of the film series.

But after my second viewing many years later I decided to sell it. Just not something I ever need to see again. Has its moments, but can't match the book.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's see. A bunch of updates.

Brick: A re-watch. I still enjoy it.

The Lighthouse: can't say I enjoyed this one. Rough slog.

Ash Is Purest White: a bit boring

Knives Out: Re-watch. I love this movie.

Uncut Gems: A bit over-hyped, but decent movie.

Thief: this was pretty cool, but 80s relationships on screen make no sense. Proto-Heat in a way.

The Irishmen: I loved this, and never found it boring except for perhaps the very end.

Joker: I mean this was okay, and I get it's a modern Taxi Driver, but I could also just watch Taxi Driver.

Jojo Rabbit: stopped halfway in because it was boring

Ad Astra: should have been better

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, onecaseman said:

Ad Astra: should have been better

I was really hoping this would be good when it came out, went to go see it in the theaters.   Did not enjoy it at all -- besides some of the cinematography.  If I wanted to watch a whole film of Brad Pitt on the verge of crying , well, I wouldn't...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Street-Law-Italian-poster.jpg

a classic piece of poliziotteschi with one of the most recognizable pieces of italian gangster funk. carlo (franco nero) is in a witness of a bank heist. the thugs kidnap him, mug him and give him a good shake up to keep his mouth shut. he goes to the cops who frustratingly seem reluctant to follow through with an investigation. to make matters worse, he keeps seeing the thugs around town. 

this is a by-the-numbers everyday guy takes matters into his own hands revenge story with the 70s euro-crime edge of hardboiled corrupt cops, over-the-top bad guys and desperate no-holds barred violence that doesn't spare the innocent. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2020 at 12:39 PM, ooqpoo said:

Jay & Silent Bob Reboot was a depressing experience. I've always had a soft spot for the world of Clerks/Jay & Silent Bob, but there was absolutely no redeeming elements in this.

  Reveal hidden contents

except for the grilled chicken joint being named Cock Smoker ^^ 

 

currently streaming for free on amazon prime. might check it out (never watched any of smith's films except clerks which i really enjoyed)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2020 at 1:01 AM, Nebraska said:

4111_1-69-dimensions-69-x-102-cm-affiche

i seem to remember enjoying this film when i first watched it, but viewing it again today was a sobering experience. the director seems to have completely missed the point of using made when kubrick used 'also sprach zarathustra'- as significant moments in earth's history brought about by contact with the monolith, but also a catalyst of significant change in whoever has contact with said object. 

this director uses it as a calling card to link his film to the previous one. remember 2001? this is part 2. 

after that there are some wild constrictions of time and leaps of imagination. one scientist (in the middle of the cold war) asks a government aid to lie to the president so he can accompany a russian space mission to jupiter to recover the ship from the previous movie. he tells his wife during dinner that he is leaving and there is a very high probability that he will never return. she runs to the kitchen and slams a dish down. besides 1 bedroom scene, we never see her again. i'm assuming she dies, but who knows-

our main guy writes her regularly, but his letters seem more like mission logs with complex and (possibly?) sensitive mission directives. is/was his wife a scientist too? 
 

how did they manage to fsck up an arthur c clarke story- especially when the director was basically communicating with the author on a daily basis? whatever- he ended up doing films with jean-claude van damme which is- frankly- more his speed than anything like this.

nice try i guess?

It took me years to realize that was Helen Mirren.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/18/2020 at 12:08 AM, brian trageskin said:

doctor sleep - utter shite

If this didn’t have McGregor in it could be dropped on Netflix and cause no ripple whatsoever. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • Guest
      By Guest
      Title says it all: post a still, others guess.
       

    • By Lane Visitor
      So by now some of you guys may know about my obsession with the David Fincher film "The Game" which I went as far as to create multiple tribute albums/alternative soundtracks to (as well as a comprehensive online and IRL scavenger hunt based on the film).
       
      Anyway, I thought instead of creating a thread on the film- which I may do as well- that I'd draw focus to the screenwriters John Brancato and Michael Ferris--which not much is known or published about them outside of just their list of credits, at least that I could find. This screenwriting duo who penned the film's story, have a vast resume of films - and they all share a similar thread: very paranoid, conspiratorial thrillers that are usually psychological, often creepy, and typically very mind bending and puzzling. I also think they deserve an IDM award for the types of movies they write. Naturally, the 1997 pair up of Brancato and Ferris with Fincher for The Game was just a dead on perfect move. And adding Michael Douglas as character Van Orton just put the icing on the cake.
       
      Here is a list of their films:
       
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brancato_and_Michael_Ferris
       
      What I've been finding most fascinating lately is the detailed connection I discovered between several of their films- namely The Game and Terminator 3: Rise of The Machines...
       
      No true spoilers here or anything (soft spoilers at best)..
       
      In The Game, fraudulent corporation Consumer Recreation Services are a massive part of the film's focus and the company behind the "game" that Michael Douglas plays. They are referred to in various parts to the film (partial spoiler alert) as CRS - but using different words for the same acronym all under the guise of different offshoots of the same company (Cable Repair Specialists, California Regal Sedans, etc).
       
      In Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, (and for the first time in the series), its revealed that Skynet project's parent company (who built the Terminators themselves) is called Cyber Research Systems which uses the same acronym CRS. There's even a wiki on it: http://terminator.wikia.com/wiki/Cyber_Research_Systems
       
      I can't help but think there may be a connection--at the very least a simple nod to the evil corporation theme of Brancato and Ferris' previous films... but possibly even more deep and complex of a link (which would be amazing). I've scourged Google for any published mention of this connection, and found 1 mere sighting where another person mentioned something, but was very surface and wasn't really intentional linking. Either way, it seems hard to imagine these were coincidental, and now I'm on a quest to watch every Brancato/Ferris film to see if there are other threads running through their various screenplays. So far, I've seen The Game, The Net, Catwoman, Terminator 3, Flight of Black Angel, and an episode of The Others.

      Anyone else familiar with their work, or keen on any of this?
       

       
      p.s. Fun side note- and [spoiler ALERT for both The Net and The Game] In their 95 screenplay for The Net, an evil corporation is also featured- called The Praetorians- computer hackers bent on stealing people's identity and using anti-virus software to actually infect computers with viruses to create mayhem and steal information-- almost identical to the goal of CRS in The Game. (Also, found it pretty cool that the software company Sandra Bullock works for is called Cathedral Software ... ahem... CathedRal Software. I know I know, that's a stretch).
       
      p.p.s. this thread is literally the first time I've seen any mention of these screenwriters on the web that i could find (outside of databases, wikipedia's, credits on product pages etc). I know screenwriters are often behind the scenes, but damn, it's crazy to me how obscure these guys seem to be as far as information, etc. I did find their production company website, but it's outdated and seems to be more of just a framework. I was excited to hear their narration on the directors commentary feature of The Game's Criterion Collection edition though. :)
    • By Joyrex
      Josh Cooley has a book coming out featuring famous scenes from R-rated movies in the style of children's books. Really cool stuff!
       



    • By Berk
      Can anyone recommend me movies in the vein of Drive (2011), Maniac (2012), that sort of stuff? I love this kind of dark, rainy, inner city setting. I even started playing Max Payne 2 again because of this.
       
      If I'm not mistaken, a lot of this stuff stems from the 50s, but I'm not sure if I'll enjoy, so I'm guessing 70s and up would be best.
       
      Thanks a lot!
       
      PS. You can recommend games too if you like, Gemini Rue is a great noir adventure / puzzle game
    • By Cheladrix
      Didn't see a post about this when I searched, so I thought I'd mention it. Back in October, Biosphere posted the silent film 'Man With A Movie Camera' to Youtube complete with his score and I only just found it. I have the 2cd set of Substrata that includes this, but I hadn't seen the movie with the score synced up before. It's really awesome how parts of the music act as sound for what's going on in the film. For example, the sample 'sorry to wake you' coincides with a woman waking up. And the various spectral sounds that seem like part of the music when you listen to the score by itself turn out to be foley for machines and trains when you watch the movie.
       
      There is a brief childbirth scene, so you might get a bit grossed out, but this is balanced out by the cute topless Soviet woman giving herself a mud bath. Kind of racy for 1929.
       
      http://youtu.be/iIguRl-1EvY
×
×
  • Create New...