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On 2/4/2020 at 4:17 AM, Soloman Tump said:

Niiiice, I only have a stereo speaker setup at present though.... is the DVD version recorded in 5.1?

I was listening to it on spotify, to be honest.  

On 2/15/2020 at 3:47 PM, Nebraska said:

 

This is really happening.  People are getting their accounts deleted and the same is happening for paypal and discogs.  Simply having words like "Genocide" within track titles is enough to get a release banned.   I'm not sure about what is simply tagged "noise", but a number of noise artists are unsure of why they were banned, maybe because of imagery.  Sounds like legal action waiting to happen, if someone gets off their ass long enough to get a class action suit going.   

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On 10/14/2019 at 1:08 PM, xox said:

I always wonder how ppl tell when one noiz artist is ‘better’ than the rest and i came to the conclusion that same as in many other genres (and other areas of life) looks play one of the major roles in popularity of artists, like being a woman, having a nice ass and tits, being an etnic or race minority member, radiating extreme narcisism and well being... same here, nobody cant beat Merzbow’s pritty hear; itz very long and nicely conditioned. Beautiful! No wonder ppl love his music!

Merzbow is credited with bringing forth "harsh noise" as a genre (or subgenre) of noise music. 
Even before that, some of his tape work/sound collage work is excellent, and exceeded the quality of its peers for years to come.  Of course, some of it was crap too, but that's noise, and "being in the moment" etc.   I really enjoy this one from the 80s, for example. 

 

Noise music has existed since the 1910s, but harsh noise, and especially Japanese harsh noise really came into play in the early 90s, as a "movement" or what-have-you.  Generally speaking though, I'd agree with you on some level.  Merzbow still may not be remembered at all if he were overweight, for example.  I find this frustrating in every genre.  Janis Joplin, Aretha Franklin, etc.  These folks wouldn't make it in our time, regardless of their voices or talents.  I'll keep my mouth shut about specific noise artists, but noise music has been getting too cute for me for a number of years.  Ugly people make good noise too!  

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OEZ.jpg

https://nopartofit.blogspot.com/search/label/interview

One-Eyed Zatoichi is a preferred nomenclature from the spearhead of a noise project called Thirteen Hurts, which also has a leg of it separately titled "13Hz" for his modular work, as I understand it.  I think it's important to note, because I remember being told that there are no other sources beyond pedals for Thirteen Hurts, but to some, it does sound like a synthesizer is in there somewhere.   I met OEZ in Denver several times and again in St. Petersburg, Florida, in which case he drove 2,000 miles to play for 15 minutes at a noise fest.  At that time, he lived in some sort of solar-powered dome within the guts of Colorado foothills, six hours from any sort of civilization.   I've seen noise artists with too many pedals, and OEZ has more than those dudes, but he has a bizarre precision and intent with his performances.  They are cinematic and rowdy in nature.  Of course, he has a release on NO PART OF IT, but his previous two releases are also pretty starkly placed within the realm of what I'd want from a pedal noise/"heavy electronics" artist.  I also find his work to be unique in that I am taken to a specific abstract place when listening to it-- it has substance (which I regularly find off-putting in harsh noise releases) that suggests an intention and would be fitting for some sort of UFO hunter or a person digging around in tunnels looking for reptilians.  What I mean here, is not necessarily do I think OEZ is into that kind of thing, but I find his sounds to be inherently visual/exploratory in a way that I don't come across much.   It is entirely coincidental that this is the 13th interview in the series, by the way. 

This interview series is will be published on the 13th of every month, all from people who answered the same questions at the same time, scheduled in February/March of 2019, and will go on for several years.  

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Quote

Stephen Bishop runs the UK-based Opal Tapes, one of the most diverse and unpredictable imprints of the last decade. During that time Bishop has made a wealth of recordings under the name Basic House, but now he’s chosen a new moniker, Lacrima, for a new musical approach that recalls the glory days of harsh noise.

 

 

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On 3/13/2020 at 10:18 AM, no part of it said:

OEZ.jpg

https://nopartofit.blogspot.com/search/label/interview

One-Eyed Zatoichi is a preferred nomenclature from the spearhead of a noise project called Thirteen Hurts, which also has a leg of it separately titled "13Hz" for his modular work, as I understand it.  I think it's important to note, because I remember being told that there are no other sources beyond pedals for Thirteen Hurts, but to some, it does sound like a synthesizer is in there somewhere.   I met OEZ in Denver several times and again in St. Petersburg, Florida, in which case he drove 2,000 miles to play for 15 minutes at a noise fest.  At that time, he lived in some sort of solar-powered dome within the guts of Colorado foothills, six hours from any sort of civilization.   I've seen noise artists with too many pedals, and OEZ has more than those dudes, but he has a bizarre precision and intent with his performances.  They are cinematic and rowdy in nature.  Of course, he has a release on NO PART OF IT, but his previous two releases are also pretty starkly placed within the realm of what I'd want from a pedal noise/"heavy electronics" artist.  I also find his work to be unique in that I am taken to a specific abstract place when listening to it-- it has substance (which I regularly find off-putting in harsh noise releases) that suggests an intention and would be fitting for some sort of UFO hunter or a person digging around in tunnels looking for reptilians.  What I mean here, is not necessarily do I think OEZ is into that kind of thing, but I find his sounds to be inherently visual/exploratory in a way that I don't come across much.   It is entirely coincidental that this is the 13th interview in the series, by the way. 

This interview series is will be published on the 13th of every month, all from people who answered the same questions at the same time, scheduled in February/March of 2019, and will go on for several years.  

Thanks for posting this... I'm a basic bitch when it comes to noise, but I'm listening to UVB-76 now and it's really doing something for me.

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On 4/12/2020 at 7:40 AM, sweepstakes said:

Thanks for posting this... I'm a basic bitch when it comes to noise, but I'm listening to UVB-76 now and it's really doing something for me.

Thank you!  It's a very obscure project actually.  He only did two other CDs, and they're great, but I don't think you can hear them online at all, and I don't know if there is a way to purchase it brand new online.  I do think it is a unique project that deserves more attention, but I'm in the minority for sure.    Here is this month's interview, much more widely known artist, but still very unique!   

 

...

 

The no part of it interview series was a series of questions answered by 30+ people at the same time around March 2018.   A new entry is published on the 13th of each month.   

unnamed.jpg

Scheduled in March 2019
I wonder how many people will read this having not heard of dave phillips.  I started this series of "interviews" partly wanting to pick the brains of a number of people whose work I do not fully have at hand.  In dp's case, I have heard/bought quite a lot of it, he is very prolific, and interviewed him once before already, but I would add that he is still one of the foremost and distinctive noise artists in the history of the genre.  I'm not necessarily speaking in terms of popularity, but the most innovative, yet utilitarian approach to the totally open-ended idea of being able to do whatever one wants with recordings.  At times it is as raw and primal as it is classical and precise, transcending simple "fluxus" or "avant-garde" appelations.  His work is a genuine mythos of its own.  With that, at the risk of saying something less articulate than I have in the past, I'll just add a quote from the previous interview:

When I saw him perform twice last year (2011), both sets were distinctly different, but both succeeded in affecting a certain aboriginal feeling in my body, by way of subsonic frequencies or animal instincts or what-have-you, and bypassed my natural inclination to be turned off by what I would normally call sanctimonious presentations in a performance context. One set consisted of several layers of untreated insect field recordings, like a choir that was conducted into an exhilarating sort of Eno-esque hum. Dave passed around infosheets that expounded upon the importance of bugs in the entire scheme of our food chain, and sat barefoot Indian style.

The second set was even more visceral, a video montage of animals being skinned alive, a live wolf getting its leg hacked off and its head stomped into mush, or a dead monkey with the word “CRAP” carved into its forehead occupied the screen alongside messages like “errare humanum est” or “the self some imagine surviving death is a phantom even in life”. Walking around with a mask on, breathing into remote loop pedals, and triggering various sounds of animals screaming over string samples, Phillips chiseled together a dizzying miasma of tragically unnecessary pain, graphically unrelenting death, and the intrinsically cruel nature of human condition, who in its “civilized” state, refuses to tend to the ugly corners of reality. It was still the most effective exhibition I have ever seen, and I think that Dave Phillips will be remembered as a shining example of someone who transcended academic circles and noise or music scenes alike.

http://nopartofit.blogspot.com/2020/04/interview-series-14-dave-phillips.html
 

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  • 3 weeks later...

New 39 track noise compilation just released... managed to get a track of mine on there ?

https://foreverescapingboredom.bandcamp.com/album/covid-19-compilation-recorded-under-quarantine

 

FEB-111: COVID-19 COMPILATION: RECORDED UNDER QUARANTINE

39 artists from the Sunshine State and beyond recording under the duress of a pandemic.

Featuring:

Sloth, Male Model, Novasak, Elsie Shiro, Glaive, This Is What I Hear When You Talk, Su Sous Toulouse en Rouge, Hal McGee, Black Beast of Arrrghhh, Otolathe, {AN} Eel, Mental Anguish, Vasectomy Party, --minusminus, Aversion to Reality, Arvo Zylo, Ghosts of Dead Tables, Subaltern, RUBBISH, Chris Reierson, Lezet, Gain of Function, Rafael Flores, Sid Yiddish, Planet Shithead, Leandro Kalén, Lumpy's Quarantine Times String e.Band, Szymkowiak Joseph, Adam Naworal, Greathumour, Soloman Tump ft. Tom and Ed, Stonejaw, Matthew M. Conroy, AZOIKUM, Formaldehydra, KR Seward, Antropozoa, Thomas Park, and JLIAT.

2 x CD-R edition forthcoming.

spacer.png

Co-Presented by Forever Escaping Boredom and The Saint Petersburg Institute of Noise (S.P.I.N.).

Project conceived of, Compiled, and Arranged by Zachary Short.

Edited by Soloman Tump
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