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Basement studio?


Guest The Bro

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Guest The Bro

I'm going to be moving from my existing room in a flatshare to a bigger room in a houseshare.

 

Now the cool thing about this place is it has a renovated basement. My question is though would the acoustics in there be too bassy for a studio or should I just stick to having it in my room.

 

Over to you guys.

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I'm going to be moving from my existing room in a flatshare to a bigger room in a houseshare. Now the cool thing about this place is it has a renovated basement. My question is though would the acoustics in there be too bassy for a studio or should I just stick to having it in my room. Over to you guys.

 

Well, if you gave us some details about the basement then we might be able to help you. How big is that basement? 400 square meters, you say? It's made out of metal, you say? Wonderful!

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I'm in the process of sorting out a new flatmate, if it turns out to be the Bro I'm going to be quite upset. I suspect a rerun of the Tim Robbins scene in War of the Worlds. If either me or the Bro stop posting you know what's happened.

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Guest The Bro

 

 

 

I'm going to be moving from my existing room in a flatshare to a bigger room in a houseshare. Now the cool thing about this place is it has a renovated basement. My question is though would the acoustics in there be too bassy for a studio or should I just stick to having it in my room. Over to you guys.

Well, if you gave us some details about the basement then we might be able to help you. How big is that basement? 400 square meters, you say? It's made out of metal, you say? Wonderful!

The basement is brick and its about 12ft by 6ft I reckon. Is that any help?
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I'm going to be moving from my existing room in a flatshare to a bigger room in a houseshare. Now the cool thing about this place is it has a renovated basement. My question is though would the acoustics in there be too bassy for a studio or should I just stick to having it in my room. Over to you guys.

Well, if you gave us some details about the basement then we might be able to help you. How big is that basement? 400 square meters, you say? It's made out of metal, you say? Wonderful!

The basement is brick and its about 12ft by 6ft I reckon. Is that any help?

 

Brick is gonna be reflective I reckon. If you can find a way to dampen the reflectiveness, then that's a start.

 

Honestly just throw up sheets. No need to spend $5000 on acoustic treatment or whatever the asinine Gearslutz prescription is these days.

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I'm going to be moving from my existing room in a flatshare to a bigger room in a houseshare. Now the cool thing about this place is it has a renovated basement. My question is though would the acoustics in there be too bassy for a studio or should I just stick to having it in my room. Over to you guys.

Well, if you gave us some details about the basement then we might be able to help you. How big is that basement? 400 square meters, you say? It's made out of metal, you say? Wonderful!

The basement is brick and its about 12ft by 6ft I reckon. Is that any help?

 

Brick is gonna be reflective I reckon. If you can find a way to dampen the reflectiveness, then that's a start.

 

Honestly just throw up sheets. No need to spend $5000 on acoustic treatment or whatever the asinine Gearslutz prescription is these days.

 

Yeah, put up some sheets (thick ones or multiple layers), put some big foam bricks in the bottom corner of the room (behind your speakers), and do some sweeps to see what frequencies bounce around the room.

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So you're moving into a room in a house-share... are you sure they're gonna be OK with you just taking over the basement and using it to make loud noise? That'd be my first concern

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any small acoustical space is going to suffer from modal issues of which must be addressed if one is to make accurate mixing decisions with respect to the low end response. dimensions yield poor/overlapping modal distribution. boundary material (highly resistive) will compound these issues and allow resonances (modal ringing) to persist much longer (LF decay times).

 

and this is irrespective of the high-gain early arriving destructive indirect specular energies that must also be addressed to maintain a semblance of accurate localization, imaging, and intelligibility with respect to the direct signal.

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Yeah, put up some sheets (thick ones or multiple layers), put some big foam bricks in the bottom corner of the room (behind your speakers), and do some sweeps to see what frequencies bounce around the room.

a recommendation for objects insufficient in design to achieve a set goal.

 

any porous material to be used as a broadband absorber needs to be sufficiently thick as to be placed (spaced away from rigid boundary) into areas of high particle velocity for the lower (longer) wavelengths. the erroneous recommendation and application of thin porous absorbers ("sheets", "carpets", "rugs", "foam") is far too common a theme. pressure maximizes at a rigid boundary as particle velocity goes to zero (the components are inversely proportional). porous absorbers rely on high (relative) particle velocity in order to convert kinetic energy into heat via friction as the soundwave traverses through the porous structure - attenuating the signal such that the interference caused by superposition/summation is less destructive.

 

a porous absorber designed and applied to attenuate a broadband indirect specular reflection must be sufficiently thick (and large, with respect to wavelength) to be effective to the lower schroeder cut-off; typically 250-300hz dependent upon boundary dimensions. a thin porous absorber will attenuate the mid-HF band of the indirect specular reflection, but allow the lower band to persist - essentially turning the absorber into a low-pass filter (coloring/filtering/eq'ing the reflection).

and do some sweeps to see what frequencies bounce around the room.

what is important is the time-arrival and gain of the indirect energies with respect to the direct signal. small rooms deal with local areas of variable pressure with respect to the ambient noise floor: modal resonances, non-resonance interference (SBIR), and focused specular reflections.
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I wonder if BeatMaker 2 has a high-gain early arriving destructive indirect specular energy monitor.

most acoustical measurement platforms include the envelope time curve (ETC) response to "monitor" or identify how indirect specular energy impedes the listening position (gain with respect to time).

 

http://www.focalpress.com/uploadedFiles/Books/Book_Media/Audio/9780240808307.pdf

 

ARTA, Fuzzmeasure Pro (for MAC), and Room EQ Wizard is available free of charge (http://www.hometheatershack.com/roomeq/)

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once you know the total time of flight for the indirect energy (as measured with respect to the direct signal), one can then work backwards to calculate the total flight path distance of the indirect energy and identify the incident boundary or source (since the speed of sound will be a constant within your room's medium). you can then manage the energy as required to achieve the desired response (eg, absorption, diffusion, reflection(redirection - to attenuate the signal)

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any small acoustical space is going to suffer from modal issues of which must be addressed if one is to make accurate mixing decisions with respect to the low end response. dimensions yield poor/overlapping modal distribution. boundary material (highly resistive) will compound these issues and allow resonances (modal ringing) to persist much longer (LF decay times). and this is irrespective of the high-gain early arriving destructive indirect specular energies that must also be addressed to maintain a semblance of accurate localization, imaging, and intelligibility with respect to the direct signal.

holy mother of lol

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