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that's one hell of a dream. need to replicate that! :)

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it was a garmonbozia ruse

Judy will be in your dreams nowww

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Couple of good TP explained vids on this youtube channel

 

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8 hours ago, goDel said:

Couple of good TP explained vids on this youtube channel

 

Yesss. I've been binging this guys TP3 vids for the last week or so too. He's great.

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On 7/19/2019 at 8:49 PM, chronical said:

I had a dream with Lynch and Bill Murray in it last year. Lynch was outside a café smoking a cigarette and I didn't bother trying to talk to him because he seemed busy.  I saw Murray inside, smiled at him and he smiled back. I walked up to him and asked him if he wanted to eat something and talk, he agreed but only if he could order me a bowl of ice cream. Of course I said yes! So we sat down and he ordered me some ice cream, we proceeded to talk and had a good time. Eventually the lady from the café brought me a huge bowl of just.. strawberry jam. Massive quantities. Murray just smiled at me, and then I woke up :huh:

 

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8 hours ago, hello spiral said:

Yesss. I've been binging this guys TP3 vids for the last week or so too. He's great.

i'm guessing a new episode will be posted soon. as it looks like a monthly upload schedule. and the last episode is roughly a month old.

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16 hours ago, goDel said:

Couple of good TP explained vids on this youtube channel

 

fun channel. thanks for posting. 

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am i the only one here that tries to avoid any theory spoilers? i feel dumb when all these theories are out there and i couldn't get there all by myself... don´t you guys? doesn't it spoil all the fun? now that someone mentioned that that weird womanly character in s03 is judy i can't go back to those episodes with a fresh head... :(

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Same here. Luckily, I wouldn’t say that that channel actually tries to interpret what’s going on. It’s more like a straight analysis of what goes on. But since it can be pretty hard to follow season 3 it’s actually pretty nice to have someone simply explain what is happening and who “Billy” might be ?

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6 minutes ago, Tim_J said:

am i the only one here that tries to avoid any theory spoilers? i feel dumb when all these theories are out there and i couldn't get there all by myself... don´t you guys? doesn't it spoil all the fun? now that someone mentioned that that weird womanly character in s03 is judy i can't go back to those episodes with a fresh head... ?

I mean, I think it's good to take into account that all this stuff that's floating around out there really is just "theory" b/c most of the Return is (by design) sort of inscrutable. I think it's kind of fun to hear different interpretations, and kind of think part of the point/genius of S3 in particular is that it can be read so many ways (the one caveat is that I really wish Mark Frost would have not published the Final Dossier, as I think it tries to clarify some things Lynch probably would rather leave abstract). 

That being said, I think there are still things that can actually be puzzled out by careful watching/thinking/puzzling and I find enjoyment in putting some of the pieces together - something I probably wouldn't be able to do w/out other people's thoughts/hard work. It's kinda like the theory that emerged about Mulholland Drive that helps explain what's going on there (I can dig it up if people don't know): knowing the reason why things look the way they do doesn't in the slightest diminish my enjoyment in it. 

Oh, also, the weird womanly character being judy in S3? Do you mean the "bosomy woman" outside Jeffries' room? 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, T3551ER said:

Oh, also, the weird womanly character being judy in S3? Do you mean the "bosomy woman" outside Jeffries' room? 

the weird creature that appears inside this box:

24-twin-peaks-glass-box.w700.h467.jpg

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5 minutes ago, T3551ER said:

It's kinda like the theory that emerged about Mulholland Drive that helps explain what's going on there

is it really just a theory? cause, it makes perfect sense, you can edit the md and make a new cut just like one can do with memento and put the pieces together in a different order and all makes sense... i mean, not all, but lots of it...

just saying this cause it´s the only mindfuck movie by lynch which i think i can fully grasp... there's no way i can get my head around lost highway, but who cares, it's trippy and dreadful as hell...

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20 minutes ago, Tim_J said:

the weird creature that appears inside this box:

24-twin-peaks-glass-box.w700.h467.jpg

AHhh right. Ok, so that thing is referred to in that episode as the "Experiment Model" (the creature seen in E8 is called "The Experiment").  

 

14 minutes ago, Tim_J said:

is it really just a theory? cause, it makes perfect sense, you can edit the md and make a new cut just like one can do with memento and put the pieces together in a different order and all makes sense... i mean, not all, but lots of it...

just saying this cause it´s the only mindfuck movie by lynch which i think i can fully grasp... there's no way i can get my head around lost highway, but who cares, it's trippy and dreadful as hell...

Yah, trying to cover my bases. I would agree it's totally on point. . . I guess what I'm saying is, if there is some similar theory about TP, I don't mind if someone figures it out, because it'll still be amazeballs to me. 

I've been trying to figure out Lost Highway for 20 fucking years (or however long it's been since it came out in the theater). It keeps me up at night. . .

EDIT: GoDEL THANK YOU for those links. Shit it tight. Dude does a great job of focusing on analysis w/ support from the text and calling out when he might be going "out on a limb" love it. 

Also, to fry your brains:

huzsx9iczin21.jpg 

Edited by T3551ER
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I really need to dive into Lost Highway and all of his other films. I've seen and read all of the Twin Peaks material but beyond that Dune and Blue Velvet are the only Lynch movies I've seen.

 

 

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I forgot to post this too but this interview with Alan Moore at 32:10 reminds me of Season 3's reveal

of what Jeffries realized Judy was, and how his fate and Coopers are one in the same in terms of this terrifying and liberating epiphany

about time and space and how mankind's unravelling of the scientific mysteries of the universe isn't some step toward moral enlightenment  and addressing good versus evil so much as a reckoning with it simply being a fundamental part of our existence.

 

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He has also made an explanation for Lost Highway, btw. 

In short:

Spoiler

The story is told from the perspective of a deranged person who murdered a couple of people. (David Bowie track "I'm deranged")

 

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1 hour ago, joshuatxuk said:

I really need to dive into Lost Highway and all of his other films. I've seen and read all of the Twin Peaks material but beyond that Dune and Blue Velvet are the only Lynch movies I've seen.

Damn. You're in for a treat. You should watch Mulholland Drive next.

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New corn pone flicks

 

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How good are Mark Frost's books on Twin Peaks? Curious about the newest one especially..

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EApYS_3XsAUoCHk?format=png&name=small

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On 7/22/2019 at 7:23 PM, goDel said:

He has also made an explanation for Lost Highway, btw. 

In short:

  Reveal hidden contents

 

I'm always held the opinion that Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive & INLAND EMPIRE are three sides of the same coin

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Well that's a huge oversimplification, in the sense e that they are all about the dark side of Hollywood yes true. 

Also the films highlight the huge rift between the main characters external and internal lives/reality. 

Spoiler

Lost Highway break down from auralcrave.com

The meaning of the film is actually there and lays more in Freud psychological theory: Lost Highway tells the story of a schizophrenic man who loses contact with reality, kills his wife and then, from prison, escapes in an unconscious projection of his life.

What’s real is that Fred is a jazz musician betrayed by his wife, with some impotence problems; the projection is the one starting from the blue lights in prison, probably a sign that the electrocution has already started. In the projection, we have three main characters: Pete, the Mystery man and Mr. Eddie, and they represent the three parts of our psyche according to Sigmund Freud: Ego, Id and Super-Ego. The id is the set of impulsive instincts, the ones that need to be filtered and kept under control in a sane mind. The super-Ego is the moralizing part of our mind, the one that comes from our eduction and rational principles. The ego is our personality, that tries to reach the best balance among the inputs from the Id, the Super-Ego and the world we live in.

Pete is the projection of Fred’s ego, or rather the person he would like to be, a young man, good at sex, appreciated at work, able to “steal” the others’ woman; the mystery man represents the Freudian Id, the instinctive impulses, who records everything he sees (he observes the real facts, not their interpretation), lives “at home” (in your intimate sphere) and eventually helps Pete to kill Mr. Eddie;  Mr. Eddie is the Freudian Super-Ego, the moral conscience, holder of the rules and the ethics, who reacts vehemently if you don’t respect the speed limit, representing the authority to be afraid of. Real life is therefore what happens until the prison, while what happens from that moment on is a mental projection, which begins with the blue flashes and ends again on the highway, again in the blue light of the electric chair. In that moment, the Id already killed the Super-ego and Fred losed the psychic structure that keeps him in the world of rules, making him lose control.

https://auralcrave.com/en/2018/08/15/lost-highway-explained-the-psychic-collapse-of-david-lynchs-masterpiece/

Mulholland Drive breakdown also from auralcrave.com 

Mulholland Drive is a film about dissociation, but in spite of Scorsese’s main interest into assembling a great human drama within his movies, Lynch prefers to be exclusively focused on the oneiric dimension. The Trauma, the Dream, and the dream as trauma. Mulholland Drive is the greatest study of a dream – and therefore of a trauma – ever seen in theatres, which takes place on three interlacing and overlapping levels – Reality, Dream and Subconscious. As usual, this happens without any explanation being given and leaving the viewer the task of putting things in a particular order (as occurred in Lost Highway). There is no mystery to be revealed nor thriller involved, there is no peculiar human tragedy. In order to love and understand the movie, one has to necessary go with the flow and enter the dream.

Diane Selwyn (Naomi Watts) is an aspiring Hollywood star who has never managed to break into acting and she has recently ended her relationship with Camilla Rhodes (Laura Harring), a well-established actress who gives her a hand to get minor roles in several movies. After being invited to a dinner party by Camilla and riding in a limousine on Mulholland Drive, her ride is interrupted: waiting for her along the road her ex-girlfriend surprisingly arrives to walk her up to a party at Adam Kesher’s house (Justin Theroux), director of their upcoming film. Diane’s deep shock after Camilla and Adam announce their engagement during the party forces her to hire a hitman to kill the woman has betrayed her. The killer shows her a blue key: when Diane sees it again, it will mean the job has been fulfilled. Although this is a turning point, it’s not placed at the beginning of the movie, but just before the end, so everything else happening in the first two hours of Mulholland Drive is nothing but Diane’s dream and her subconscious mind struggling to deal with her love affair and guilt over the decision to have Camilla killed.

https://auralcrave.com/en/2019/01/27/mulholland-drive-a-complete-explanation-of-david-lynchs-movie/

Inland Empire breakdown from the guardian 

The theories are legion. Among the critics, industry totem Variety had one of the most hopeful sallies. To their Jay Weissberg, not only did the film's rabbit sitcom represent an overt link to Alice In Wonderland, the relentless blurring of Dern's identities suggested Lynch, with his devotion to transcendental meditation, was actually expounding on reincarnation. For the Boston Globe's Ty Burr, the film should be understood as a treatise on (to paraphrase its own tagline) all "women in trouble". The film's litany of flickering screens meant to Slant's Ed Gonzalez that it was clearly about "the ecstasy and healing power of watching movies", while for others the cursed production framing the rest of the movie constituted a poisoned valentine to old Hollywood and/or the modern film industry.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2007/mar/09/whatisdavidlynchsinlandem

Basically they all show the results of emotional trauma and some kind of complete mental breakdown, Lynch shows the internal workings of these fractured individuals minds, like a twisted kaleidoscope of pain and anguish somehow made visible and projected onscreen. The mans a bloody genius mate no question about it.

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3 minutes ago, MadameChaos said:

-  in the sense that they are all about the dark side of Hollywood. 

- the films highlight the huge rift between the main characters external and internal lives/reality. 

- Basically they all show the results of emotional trauma and some kind of complete mental breakdown

This is indeed the design of my said coin interpretation.

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4 hours ago, mcbpete said:

I'm always held the opinion that Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive & INLAND EMPIRE are three sides of the same coin

This is so weird. The Mandela effect in full effect. In the book Lynch on Lynch I remember reading that Lynch said that Lost Highway takes place in the same universe as Twin Peaks. I just spent 20 minutes going through the chapter on Lost Highway and couldn't find anything apart from this:
 

Quote

Rodley: One intriguing character who crossed the boundary between the lives of Fred and Pete is The Mystery Man.
He reminded me of The Man From Another Place from "Twin Peaks" - a representative from somewhere else. Another world, maybe?

Lynch: Yeah, he is. I don't want to say what he is to me. But he's a hair of an abstraction.

So I Google it and it turns out that I'm not the only one who remembers reading this. Wtf? I need to look into this.But yeah, I can definitely see Lost Highway being set in the same universe or whatchamacallit as Mulholland Drive. Or as you said, at least they're about the same thing. I've only watched Inland Empire twice so I'm gonna leave that one on the shelf. But the way I see it both Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway are about

Spoiler

 

jealousy and murdering your loved one in one way or another and then fleeing into a dream world where everything is flipped on its head. The jealous, introverted, middle-aged jazz musician who can't please his wife sexually turns into a young handsome fella who hates jazz, and who "gets more pussy than a toilet seat" as one of the cops say.
The same goes for Mulholland Drive. A failed actress dreams about becoming the talk of the town and ends up in a relationship with the girl she loves whereas in real life the girl is in a relationship with the director and the failed actress hires a hitman to kill her.
In both movies their dream world slowly falls apart and isn't able to sustain itself.

Oh, and Bill Pullman end up being electrocuted in the electric chair and Naomi Watts shoots herself in the head. 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, MadameChaos said:

Well that's a huge oversimplification, in the sense e that they are all about the dark side of Hollywood yes true. 

Also the films highlight the huge rift between the main characters external and internal lives/reality. 

  Hide contents

Lost Highway break down from auralcrave.com

The meaning of the film is actually there and lays more in Freud psychological theory: Lost Highway tells the story of a schizophrenic man who loses contact with reality, kills his wife and then, from prison, escapes in an unconscious projection of his life.

What’s real is that Fred is a jazz musician betrayed by his wife, with some impotence problems; the projection is the one starting from the blue lights in prison, probably a sign that the electrocution has already started. In the projection, we have three main characters: Pete, the Mystery man and Mr. Eddie, and they represent the three parts of our psyche according to Sigmund Freud: Ego, Id and Super-Ego. The id is the set of impulsive instincts, the ones that need to be filtered and kept under control in a sane mind. The super-Ego is the moralizing part of our mind, the one that comes from our eduction and rational principles. The ego is our personality, that tries to reach the best balance among the inputs from the Id, the Super-Ego and the world we live in.

Pete is the projection of Fred’s ego, or rather the person he would like to be, a young man, good at sex, appreciated at work, able to “steal” the others’ woman; the mystery man represents the Freudian Id, the instinctive impulses, who records everything he sees (he observes the real facts, not their interpretation), lives “at home” (in your intimate sphere) and eventually helps Pete to kill Mr. Eddie;  Mr. Eddie is the Freudian Super-Ego, the moral conscience, holder of the rules and the ethics, who reacts vehemently if you don’t respect the speed limit, representing the authority to be afraid of. Real life is therefore what happens until the prison, while what happens from that moment on is a mental projection, which begins with the blue flashes and ends again on the highway, again in the blue light of the electric chair. In that moment, the Id already killed the Super-ego and Fred losed the psychic structure that keeps him in the world of rules, making him lose control.

https://auralcrave.com/en/2018/08/15/lost-highway-explained-the-psychic-collapse-of-david-lynchs-masterpiece/

Mulholland Drive breakdown also from auralcrave.com 

Mulholland Drive is a film about dissociation, but in spite of Scorsese’s main interest into assembling a great human drama within his movies, Lynch prefers to be exclusively focused on the oneiric dimension. The Trauma, the Dream, and the dream as trauma. Mulholland Drive is the greatest study of a dream – and therefore of a trauma – ever seen in theatres, which takes place on three interlacing and overlapping levels – Reality, Dream and Subconscious. As usual, this happens without any explanation being given and leaving the viewer the task of putting things in a particular order (as occurred in Lost Highway). There is no mystery to be revealed nor thriller involved, there is no peculiar human tragedy. In order to love and understand the movie, one has to necessary go with the flow and enter the dream.

Diane Selwyn (Naomi Watts) is an aspiring Hollywood star who has never managed to break into acting and she has recently ended her relationship with Camilla Rhodes (Laura Harring), a well-established actress who gives her a hand to get minor roles in several movies. After being invited to a dinner party by Camilla and riding in a limousine on Mulholland Drive, her ride is interrupted: waiting for her along the road her ex-girlfriend surprisingly arrives to walk her up to a party at Adam Kesher’s house (Justin Theroux), director of their upcoming film. Diane’s deep shock after Camilla and Adam announce their engagement during the party forces her to hire a hitman to kill the woman has betrayed her. The killer shows her a blue key: when Diane sees it again, it will mean the job has been fulfilled. Although this is a turning point, it’s not placed at the beginning of the movie, but just before the end, so everything else happening in the first two hours of Mulholland Drive is nothing but Diane’s dream and her subconscious mind struggling to deal with her love affair and guilt over the decision to have Camilla killed.

https://auralcrave.com/en/2019/01/27/mulholland-drive-a-complete-explanation-of-david-lynchs-movie/

Inland Empire breakdown from the guardian 

The theories are legion. Among the critics, industry totem Variety had one of the most hopeful sallies. To their Jay Weissberg, not only did the film's rabbit sitcom represent an overt link to Alice In Wonderland, the relentless blurring of Dern's identities suggested Lynch, with his devotion to transcendental meditation, was actually expounding on reincarnation. For the Boston Globe's Ty Burr, the film should be understood as a treatise on (to paraphrase its own tagline) all "women in trouble". The film's litany of flickering screens meant to Slant's Ed Gonzalez that it was clearly about "the ecstasy and healing power of watching movies", while for others the cursed production framing the rest of the movie constituted a poisoned valentine to old Hollywood and/or the modern film industry.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2007/mar/09/whatisdavidlynchsinlandem

Basically they all show the results of emotional trauma and some kind of complete mental breakdown, Lynch shows the internal workings of these fractured individuals minds, like a twisted kaleidoscope of pain and anguish somehow made visible and projected onscreen. The mans a bloody genius mate no question about it.

I really don't buy into whole Freudian thing when it comes to Lynch's movies. To me his movies don't require that sort of interpretation - just like real life. Life is confusing but we, individually, make sense of it in ways that don't translate well into an actual explainable explanation. When I tell my girlfriend about a dream I had I can't possibly explain to her how frightened I was. Unless you're a poet, when you talk about a dream, this big grand and horrifying nightmare, becomes smaller. 

I think that's why I prefer watching his movies when I'm alone because I don't need to talk to anyone about it afterwards. I really don't want to hear anyone's opinion about his movies. But then on the other hand, I'm always intrigued by what people have to say about them  ;) 

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