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I really don't think it's useful to lump Mulholland Drive, Lost Highway and Inland Empire together. Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway essentially have a fairly classic story underneath them. Once you understand the underlying structure they're fairly straightforward even. Inland Empire however is a different beast. Even from the perspective of how it was produced. If I recall correctly, lots of it was made on set without a clear written story. As opposed to the previous two. MD and LH had an actual story.

Yeah, they're made by Lynch. And some of it took place in LA. MD explicitly so. Hollywood was an integral part of the story. LH used Hollywood mostly as a decor, but the story could have taken place anywhere, imo. IE....well, you tell me. Even after reading the explanation MadameChaos posted, I didn't get any wiser, tbh. 

@Squee: LH was co-written by someone with a fairly straightforward story in mind. Whether or not that's Freudian is another thing. Point is, the confusion inherent to LH is not one similar from ordinary life, but due to the mental disorder of the storyteller. As a normal viewer, you ought to be confused I guess. But that's as far as normal as it gets. The meaning comes from understanding the mental disorder of the storyteller. You can put this aside as a sort of personal preference to appreciate the movie, but the writer actually attempted to tell the story from the perspective of a deranged person. It's your choice to discard that. 

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No one portraits evil as good as lynch! We usually like to suppress our understandings of evil, subconsciously, bc all of us can feel it within ourselves and we don’t like it. It’s easier to project it to film characters and in a fun way (like in tarantino’s movies) but it’s hard to watch lynch bc he  really shows us how bad it can be and what a murder really is in its essence, really how much bad it is, how bad we can be and how important it is to monitor that evil in us and elsewhere. That’s his main theme imo in everything he does and imo it’s the second most important theme there is for which he’s second to none. 

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Cant take that shitty digital film with IE

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6 hours ago, Squee said:

This is so weird. The Mandela effect in full effect. In the book Lynch on Lynch I remember reading that Lynch said that Lost Highway takes place in the same universe as Twin Peaks. I just spent 20 minutes going through the chapter on Lost Highway and couldn't find anything apart from this:
 

So I Google it and it turns out that I'm not the only one who remembers reading this. Wtf? I need to look into this.But yeah, I can definitely see Lost Highway being set in the same universe or whatchamacallit as Mulholland Drive. Or as you said, at least they're about the same thing. I've only watched Inland Empire twice so I'm gonna leave that one on the shelf. But the way I see it both Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway are about

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jealousy and murdering your loved one in one way or another and then fleeing into a dream world where everything is flipped on its head. The jealous, introverted, middle-aged jazz musician who can't please his wife sexually turns into a young handsome fella who hates jazz, and who "gets more pussy than a toilet seat" as one of the cops say.
The same goes for Mulholland Drive. A failed actress dreams about becoming the talk of the town and ends up in a relationship with the girl she loves whereas in real life the girl is in a relationship with the director and the failed actress hires a hitman to kill her.
In both movies their dream world slowly falls apart and isn't able to sustain itself.

Oh, and Bill Pullman end up being electrocuted in the electric chair and Naomi Watts shoots herself in the head. 

 

 

I also have a TP mandela effect experience. I distinctly remember seeing an interview with Miguel Ferrer about how he goes into the amazon once a year to take part in an ayahuasca ceremony and him talking about first meeting a tribe there while on a trip and them inviting him to take part in a ceremony after he'd spent several days with them and having his mind blown. It was a feature of the definitive gold box set I have but I've never been able to find it on there after first seeing it. Haven't looked online btw as I'd kind of forgotten about it until reading your post so probably it's out there and everybody remembers. Who knows. If only there was some way to find out. 

My apologies for this post.      

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7 hours ago, Squee said:

This is so weird. The Mandela effect in full effect. In the book Lynch on Lynch I remember reading that Lynch said that Lost Highway takes place in the same universe as Twin Peaks. I just spent 20 minutes going through the chapter on Lost Highway and couldn't find anything apart from this:
 

So I Google it and it turns out that I'm not the only one who remembers reading this. Wtf? I need to look into this.But yeah, I can definitely see Lost Highway being set in the same universe or whatchamacallit as Mulholland Drive. Or as you said, at least they're about the same thing. I've only watched Inland Empire twice so I'm gonna leave that one on the shelf. But the way I see it both Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway are about

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jealousy and murdering your loved one in one way or another and then fleeing into a dream world where everything is flipped on its head. The jealous, introverted, middle-aged jazz musician who can't please his wife sexually turns into a young handsome fella who hates jazz, and who "gets more pussy than a toilet seat" as one of the cops say.
The same goes for Mulholland Drive. A failed actress dreams about becoming the talk of the town and ends up in a relationship with the girl she loves whereas in real life the girl is in a relationship with the director and the failed actress hires a hitman to kill her.
In both movies their dream world slowly falls apart and isn't able to sustain itself.

Oh, and Bill Pullman end up being electrocuted in the electric chair and Naomi Watts shoots herself in the head. 

 

 

Some of his stuff is def happening in the same Universe:

Spoiler

image.png.6e034c25c295af32adf8bc3d5f0dc8e2.png

 

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34 minutes ago, hello spiral said:

Some of his stuff is def happening in the same Universe:

  Hide contents

image.png.6e034c25c295af32adf8bc3d5f0dc8e2.png

 

I think that was debunked by Lynch himself.
But Mulholland Drive (the tv series) was supposed to be a Twin Peaks spin off starring Audrey going to LA, so who knows...

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Yeah imho that's just Lynch throwing you off the scent

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But still...

giphy.gif
 

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3 minutes ago, Squee said:

But still...

giphy.gif
 

what is he .. using exai vinyl as a paint palette ? 

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8 hours ago, goDel said:

Hollywood was an integral part of the story. LH used Hollywood mostly as a decor, but the story could have taken place anywhere, imo. IE....well, you tell me. 

Kinda big hint at the start here ?

 

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She's the girl.

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Saved a screenshot of this, a while ago. Seeing it again always makes my day.

 

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Edited by Gretsky 3D

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On 7/29/2019 at 3:50 PM, chronical said:

How good are Mark Frost's books on Twin Peaks? Curious about the newest one especially..

The Secret History of Twin Peaks is a lot more substantive and interesting: lot of backstory on the town, American secret history and paranormal stuff. The Final Dossier is basically a epilogue of the series, it's good and ties up loose ends (as much as Frost and Lynch will tie up loose ends) but if you don't want to collect either and actually buy them you can probably glean all the info from the internet. 

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23 hours ago, Squee said:

To me his movies don't require that sort of interpretation - just like real life. Life is confusing but we, individually, make sense of it in ways that don't translate well into an actual explainable explanation. When I tell my girlfriend about a dream I had I can't possibly explain to her how frightened I was. Unless you're a poet, when you talk about a dream, this big grand and horrifying nightmare, becomes smaller. 

I think that's why I prefer watching his movies when I'm alone because I don't need to talk to anyone about it afterwards. I really don't want to hear anyone's opinion about his movies. But then on the other hand, I'm always intrigued by what people have to say about them ?

This is a healthy take, as much as I like the more elaborate discussion and theories. Even in the modern age completely baffling events we'll never fully solve and perpetual quandaries in science. Lynch himself has cited personal examples.  Mystery is at core of his work. 

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1 hour ago, Gretsky 3D said:

Saved a screenshot of this, a while ago. Seeing it again always makes my day.

 

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That would've been brilliant - the perfect kinda weird thing that seems 'logical' to have happened to Pete too.

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My one and only criticism of The Return is that fucking mockney accent bell. It's hilarious that he has such a pivotal moment in it. I know he got he role based off of him doing a Youtube video of different accents fairly well, but that accent he has in the show is so cringe inducing. I watched the episode where he tells the story about how he got the glove to James Hurley at the weekend and couldn't stop laughing at the ridiculousness of it. Why did Lynch ask him to speak like that? It's arguably the most surreal thing David Lynch has ever done.

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It’s a totally accurate accent. I should know. I’m from Essex. 

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I'm sorry, its a bad accent.

But that's just how it is and I love it.

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the scene explaining the glove legit had me freaked out. it felt like a horrible nightmare. not knowing where it was going or what the dude was going to do with the glove. i hated it so much on my first viewing. i imagine twin peaks: the return will be a lot easier to watch on second viewings but the glove dude really made me uncomfortable first time round. (accent aside). 

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Doing a 2nd rewatch right now. Totally a different experience going 'round again. Knowing what is going to happen actually takes a lot of the (unnecessarily uncomfortable) tension out of things, as does being able to watch it at your own pace (e.g., the dougie jones stuff whips along and is MUCH more enjoyable when you aren't waiting a week for X to happen). 

Assume everyone here has already watched but if not, read a theory the other day that has TOTALLY reconfigured the way I'm doing my rewatch and feel compelled to post here (particularly for those who have yet to start a rewatch). It's a good one:

 

Spoiler

Mr. C. is in a loop, and knows he is in a loop. I don't agree w/ everything this poster posits, but I do think there is enough evidence in the first 7 episodes to really support this. Also, consider that someone else may ALSO be aware of multiple loops and actively is counterplanning (think about, just for example, how Mr. C. plans to have a gun in the glove box, to shoot Ray, but for whatever reason that gun ends up being unloaded when he goes to use it). 

 

 

 

 

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On 7/30/2019 at 1:59 PM, Squee said:

I really don't buy into whole Freudian thing when it comes to Lynch's movies. To me his movies don't require that sort of interpretation - just like real life. Life is confusing but we, individually, make sense of it in ways that don't translate well into an actual explainable explanation. When I tell my girlfriend about a dream I had I can't possibly explain to her how frightened I was. Unless you're a poet, when you talk about a dream, this big grand and horrifying nightmare, becomes smaller. 

I think that's why I prefer watching his movies when I'm alone because I don't need to talk to anyone about it afterwards. I really don't want to hear anyone's opinion about his movies. But then on the other hand, I'm always intrigued by what people have to say about them ?

I hear ya, but the thing that's great about Lynches work is not that you have to read into them but that you can. He and Kubrick's films have so many layers and depths that you could talk about them forever and never get to the bottom of them. You cold watch them over and over again and see a different movie every time. You can go and read about how other people view the plot, characters and themes, and if will open up room after room of thoughts and feelings and emotions. If that isn't great film-making I don't know what is.

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On 7/30/2019 at 1:41 PM, mcbpete said:

This is indeed the design of my said coin interpretation.

When you say three sided coin are you counting the edge? 

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10 minutes ago, MadameChaos said:

I hear ya, but the thing that's great about Lynches work is not that you have to read into them but that you can. He and Kubrick's films have so many layers and depths that you could talk about them forever and never get to the bottom of them. You cold watch them over and over again and see a different movie every time. You can go and read about how other people view the plot, characters and themes, and if will open up room after room of thoughts and feelings and emotions. If that isn't great film-making I don't know what is.

It's the best!

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