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Physical modelling drum synth?


modey
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doing some form of IR in conjunction with digital waveguide synthesis would be interesting, but IR's alone have never been used for generating physically modeled sound from scratch as far as i know. I understand where you are coming from but i think you're ignoring years of research and development in this area that never included the use of IR.

it could be I'm just out of the loop of new developments being made out there, if you could post one example of IR being used to physically model sound from scratch, i would be more open to what seems like a theoretical ( not practiced) idea.

Edited by John Ehrlichman
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it could be I'm just out of the loop of new developments being made out there, if you could post one example of IR being used to physically model sound from scratch, i would be more open to what seems like a theoretical ( not practiced) idea.

 

I got nothing. :sad:

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In the context of modeling a drum (e.g. a drum made of concrete) then we're just talking about modeling things bouncing off surfaces. So you model a Vic Firth 5b hickory drum stick hitting the dead center of Remo Emporor drum head at such and such a velocity and then bouncing off the concrete and then out into the room and bouncing around a bit and then ending up wherever the microphone or listener is supposed to be. So I would say 'creating a sound from scratch' per se would actually be a matter of modeling a bunch of steps like this.

Actually, in the context of modeling a huge concrete drum, it's more about the propagation of sound/vibrations inside the material. If the situation can't be simplified (i.e. you're not hitting right at the center, you want to accurately consider the thickness of the cylinder, etc) you would have to do this with finite element analysis and stuff like that.
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In the context of modeling a drum (e.g. a drum made of concrete) then we're just talking about modeling things bouncing off surfaces. So you model a Vic Firth 5b hickory drum stick hitting the dead center of Remo Emporor drum head at such and such a velocity and then bouncing off the concrete and then out into the room and bouncing around a bit and then ending up wherever the microphone or listener is supposed to be. So I would say 'creating a sound from scratch' per se would actually be a matter of modeling a bunch of steps like this.

Actually, in the context of modeling a huge concrete drum, it's more about the propagation of sound/vibrations inside the material. If the situation can't be simplified (i.e. you're not hitting right at the center, you want to accurately consider the thickness of the cylinder, etc) you would have to do this with finite element analysis and stuff like that.

 

 

Yeah you're right.

 

(As you can probably see my knowledge on the matter is pretty limited)

 

But it would appear that we have the technology to model processes of this complexity, and it would just be a matter of piecing everything together.

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I sure think we do. I've been looking around for CAE (computer aided engineering) programs that would do this sort of thing, but it seems that most of them can only export graphs of frequency and intensity and stuff like that, not actual .wav files.

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Cheers Limpy, your response was pretty much as I expected. I'm looking into doing employing some dynamic IR in equipment-modelling scenarios as you mentioned, i.e. "I like the tone of this, and the tone of this, what happens if we make a hybrid" etc.

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  • 2 years later...

Ha! Likewise ;)

It seems to sound already impressive. Can't wait to ditch my acoustic drum samples and start messing with it. My mind is about to explode, trying to imagine all the possibilities of a physical modeling drum synth by U-He.

Don't know if it's going "researchware"/free-alpha anytime soon or not though.

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It's actually the first I've heard of it, know there's 'protoverb' (the free random space algorithmic reverb) and they're doing research for RePro (a Pro-One VST) but not heard about this plugin at all !

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  • 1 year later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Alright, so I love EZdrummer and BFD and all that sample-based stuff, and they're really great for acoustic drums, but do any decent physical modelled drum VSTs exist? I'm talking realistic stuff here, I know it's probably not easy but I figured there must be something out there, right? It'd be nice to be able to fine-tune the parameters of a simulated acoustic snare, for example.

 

Wow, my first post. If you are Logic user, Ultrabeat provides a physically modeled drum for OSC 2. Its very simplistic, but can reproduce the sound an acoustic skin excited with a stick. It probably won't scratch the physical modeling itch. Logic also has Sculpture synth which can be made to do drum sounds with some programming. Its far more robust and offers a diverse range of exciters with up to 3 being used at the same time. It also includes a nice selection of "resonating bodies" for the sounds that add a wood or metal type 'box' around the sound.

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  • 5 months later...

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