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Would you leave your country and why?


pierlu
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Guest Jimmy McMessageboard

EH the grass is always greener....

 

I moved from the UK to the USA 7 years ago. It was pretty easy transition. Not seeing family is the hardest thing.

 

But moving continents is a big decision and whilst I made the decision once I don't know if I can make it again (to move back to UK). I guess these kind of decisions get harder as you get older and get more responsibilities (not that I really have any) so if you're young maybe it is a good time to try it.

 

(not that anyone asked but) my major fear on moving back to UK is twofold.

1. Feeling a stranger and/or hating it/regret

2. Finding work.

(3. the weather)

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Guest unteleportedman

Reasons why I would move to a country in Europe:

 

1 - New Beat

2 - Italo Disco

3 - Euro Dance

4 - Gabber

5 - Donk

Edited by unteleportedman
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All it would take to get me to leave the U.S. decent job in country with decent public transportation and bike lanes, preferably in or near a massive city. I'd also like to hear fewer gunshots at night, which is a challenge for American cities. :sad:

Edited by doublename
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South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

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South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

 

Huh, that reminds me, I don't think I could move to a place without a real winter. Having said that, Spain is probably my favorite country of all the ones I've visited.

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If I had a job offer and my girlfriend was down with leaving, I'd move out of the U.S. in a heartbeat. I'd learn whatever languages I need and go absolutely anywhere.

Edited by Sprigg
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Yeah, I would. If only for that fresh start/ new experience with a twist of 007 traveling the world kind of thing. You can read between the lines that i haven't got much tying me to the country where I live, apart from a job, house and family. In that order, ironically. I know a couple of people who are the complete opposite. Living their entire lives in the city they were basically born in, without any intention to move away. They've got all their friends and family within half an hour traveling, and they couldn't stand the idea of leaving them behind. I still think it's weirdly funny that people can be so attached, but that says just as much about myself, obviously.

 

Dunno, but i think the answer to this question depends a lot on relationships and attachment, especially when you get older. But that's just repeating in different words what others already said.

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I'm definitely thinking about moving around for a bit, and maybe settle in Iberia somewhere. Reasons being that the Netherlands is just way too crowded for me. I like peace. I like quiet.

 

I know I'll miss my family, especially since I'm working towards getting closer to them. However, I can't deny myself.

 

Still, I'm moving to Amsterdam in a month or so for .. I don't know.. 3 or 4 months maybe. Who knows how I'll feel about my situation after that.

Edited by Guest
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I'd consider moving to a country which is slightly more easy going and has better weather, but not completely, a couple of years or so. Somewhere I could walk with a t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops all year round would be ideal. It shouldn't also be too remote from a city, but still possible to retreat to some quiet place. Wouldn't either mind to live in a more urban milieu for a while, somewhere like Amsterdam, Berlin or some other major German city. I like their cleanliness and things just seem to work there. And why not in some even more bustling metropolis, such as London or New York. NY and Chicago are probably the only US cities I could think of staying in for a longer period. This is all hypothetical as I doubt I'll get an opportunity to do any of these things.

Edited by azatoth
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Guest Al Hounos

I did leave, kinda. I'm from the US and have been living in Korea for almost 4 years. A few more months and I'll graduate, go back to the US. I'm not really interested in living in Korea permanently.

 

Korea is a very comfortable, easy, pleasant place to live, but ultimately it's very small and a little boring. I also know that as a white person, I'll always be a 'foreigner', no matter how long I've lived here, or how well I speak Korean, or how much I love kimchi.

Not really a criticism of Korea, it's just a natural consequence of being extremely racially homogeneous and very recently developed, modernized, and globalized.

 

I'm not that excited to live in the US, though. Ideally I'd live in Sweden or Denmark because I like social democracy, but I don't think they'd want me.

For now I'll settle for Washington, Oregon, or Northern California.

Edited by Al Hounos
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Yes, I'm currently planning moving abroad. Reason: I live in a dark, frozen and barren wasteland. If I could choose freely I'd probably move to Hong Kong, but I'm guessing Berlin or Copenhagen might be more probable choices.

Edited by mokz
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Guest Rulohead32

South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

 

 

 

South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

 

Huh, that reminds me, I don't think I could move to a place without a real winter. Having said that, Spain is probably my favorite country of all the ones I've visited.

 

 

oh... really? That's because you don't actually live in Spain LOL

But, if you're a tourist, yeah, Spain is a beautiful country with lots of interesting places.

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I've always wanted give the UK a try since I was a kid. But I can't really move anywhere until my son's older. I'll probably be here for at least another 10 years. I'd be happy living in any big city anywhere as long as there's work.

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South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

 

 

 

South East Asia or Spain.. I fell in love with Spain when I was there earlier this year. It'd need to be somewhere warm; I experienced my first proper winter this year over in the US, I really didn't like it. But still, places like Canada or Alaska would be great for a while. Being a US citizen I'd be able to roam the latter for as long as I want.

 

Huh, that reminds me, I don't think I could move to a place without a real winter. Having said that, Spain is probably my favorite country of all the ones I've visited.

 

 

oh... really? That's because you don't actually live in Spain LOL

But, if you're a tourist, yeah, Spain is a beautiful country with lots of interesting places.

 

 

A large chunk of Spain is actually kind of cold in the winter, not Finland cold but cold enough to get some snow, so you might like that. Then again it's a country based on mistrust and an "inner circle" mentality (watch closely the body language of people when you try asking for directions), so when you add that to the fact that the local idiosyncrasy is nowhere near what is expected, the result is that expats usually only mingle with expats. To be honest I find the loudness and brashness of certain tourists a bit surprising so I guess the disappointment is probably mutual (that might have to do with tourism itself rather than cultural issues, though - I hear the behaviour of Spaniards abroad is quite embarrassing.)

 

So to summarise if you're not going to live in a bubble, it's only a good place to live in for a long time if you're willing to learn a lot of stuff about Spaniards, their past conflicts and their idiosyncrasies, because you're going to run into a lot of stuff, but who cares about learning that shit? I mean, if you're really interested in that then just wait until the civil war breaks out again and enlist.

 

Spanish cities, their monuments and old towns aside, are kind of ugly with a pair of exceptions, but they have the virtue of not being too suburban anywhere at all, which means you can have an urban life in non-hipster areas, which is nice. Then again expats usually aren't working class and come from countries with high median incomes so, being gentrifiers, gentrification is not an issue for them.

 

Me, I wouldn't want to move. If I moved it would be because of unemployment, and I don't find emigrating because of impoverishment an exciting prospect to be honest.

Edited by poblequadrat
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Some of the more democratic and successfully socialized countries are hard to emigrate to though, right? I was told that New Zealand for instance is really hard to get a job in if you're foreign.

 

Not to get all crying bald eagle patriotic, but I do like where I live a lot, and there are literally thousands of people who risk their lives travelling from Mexico and Central America simply to get a chance to work in Texas and other parts of the U.S., which is incredible. I mean, ideally I'd love for our current government to move out and a better one to move in. I don't envy any other country's culture, I just often envy their progress other nations have made in social norms and laws.

 

Also, Texas is pretty backasswards but I'm still glad I don't live in the deep south or Arizona, which has some very draconian counties at the moment.

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I've lived in Alaska for over 13 years now, and I think it's silly that it's still a US satellite state. It's big and remote enough to be its own country. Makes more geographical sense that way.

 

 

I've always had a really good impression about Alaska and it's overall society and government, seems like law enforcement is seemingly reasonable there for example: I've watched that NatGeo show about their State Troopers and was amazed that they actually let people off with tickets and used restraint far more than most cops do elsewhere in terms of conduct and attitude.

 

I wouldn't be shocked if they or Hawaii ever broke off. Their strategic value militarily probably made them states above anything else. In fact, even now the term CONUS is used to classify "domestic" military bases and that excludes Alaska and Hawaii.

 

I've never had any scrapes with the law here. It seems like they're stretched thin at times though. The State Troopers occasionally have to patrol some of the harsher regions, particularly if there's illegal hunting or missing persons. They probably get sent to rural villages too, but I've never been to any of them. Alcoholism and teen suicides are problematic in some of them I understand, especially during the dark winters. Either way, law enforcement here seems more level-headed than those in metropolitan areas like NYC.

 

The joint army-air force base where I work certainly had strategic value in WWII. I'm pretty sure the building I work in was constructed in the 1940s, since it was originally an aircraft hangar. The Japanese invaded Attu Island during that time too, at the far west of the Aleutian island chain. I don't think it's a coincidence that Shemya air base was set up in that area around the same time.

 

 

 

 

Yeah the villages and reservations seem pretty grim in terms of standard of living and social ills, and likewise that's often the core of the show, besides say poaching and other very "harsh region" oriented problems. I was just amazed to see them literally ticket people for having insane amounts of weed - in one episode he literally avoided arresting a guy who was holding multiple ounces so long as he destroyed it on the spot. In a typical COPS episode the same person would of been cuffed and probably insulted and embarrassed multiple times. Granted, it's a documentary, but it's refreshing to see that "public service" stressed there.

 

You work at Elmedorf I take it? That's cool that older buildings remain.

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