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Drukqs Gear and Samples


Guest skibby

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Watching BT try to use the terminal was painful, though.

 

true he didnt even know about the GUI

BT there's a guy trying desperately to hold on to his teen years too

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Guest skibby

the only software i was aware of in 2000 was cakewalk, pro tools, acid, retro as-1, rebirth, fruity loops, mix meister, stuff like that. buddies of mine in the recording studio business would hook me up with cdrs of software.

 

what were the forums back then where people exchanged knowledge about new DSP technology? where did you learn about this stuff in 2000?

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three phillips head screwdrivers, a plank of wood and a small figurine of sue pollard.

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Guest skibby

three phillips head screwdrivers, a plank of wood and a small figurine of sue pollard.

 

yes, i begin to see, its all irrelevant. what matters is the impersonal and ongoing struggle of the individual against apprehending the great mystery of signing our names in water. thank you sensei.

 

there is much i'd like to know however, such as if the final mix was done in a 'real' studio.

 

cuz, trying to opening-quotation-mark.gifcoveropening-quotation-mark.gif one of these works, for autodidactic purposes, i'm wondering what sort of effects were used in order to make each sample pop out so clearly, and a host of other wonders.

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I'm wondering what sort of effects were used in order to make each sample pop out so clearly..

I wonder if it was an Aphex Systems Aural Exciter? Sort of like how Andy Warhol actually ate Campbell's soup.

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Guest skibby

 

I'm wondering what sort of effects were used in order to make each sample pop out so clearly..

I wonder if it was an Aphex Systems Aural Exciter? Sort of like how Andy Warhol actually ate Campbell's soup.

 

 

i so wanted to mark this thread solved

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He does a bit of programming himself these days, most likely using Max on the Mac. And not a lot else these days, according to Tom Jenkinson aka Squarepusher (interviewed in Wire).

 

 

 

then whys he buying buchlas and got rooms full of modulars. i dont believe. maybe max for spitting out cv gate. or was this a quote from drukqs era?

Edited by marf
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He does a bit of programming himself these days, most likely using Max on the Mac. And not a lot else these days, according to Tom Jenkinson aka Squarepusher (interviewed in Wire).

 

 

then whys he buying buchlas and got rooms full of modulars. i dont believe. maybe max for spitting out cv gate. or was this a quote from drukqs era?

It was indeed Drukqs era. He's since gone a bit more out of the box, I think it's safe to say. :)
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Most of the tracks were done on a tracker running on a laptop.

 

Anything to back up the tracker comment? It bugs me when people drop definitive-sounding answers in threads like this, when they are just speculating. Of course let me know if you've got a source.

 

We do know that a laptop was used (from the Heiko Hoffmann interview):

 

One track in the middle for example is „Mt Saint Michel + Saint Michaels mount“ and that’s my summer holiday track. It did that track on a laptop in France while travelling around. Other tracks I’ve done in Wales or in a car and stuff like that. A lot of people are doing this these days and I really like this. With a laptop music is becoming more like folk music again. You can do it so quickly and you don’t have to rely on the studio any longer, which is not a very realistic selection of your life.
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id say he had a lot of jam sessions, recorded them, resampled them in a tracker and programmed the shit out of his source material.

Its very obvious in Afx237

So much individual chopping and individual note gating.

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id say he had a lot of jam sessions, recorded them, resampled them in a tracker and programmed the shit out of his source material.

 

Its very obvious in Afx237

 

So much individual chopping and individual note gating.

 

 

FF

00

FF

00

 

Takes me back. :D

 

That isn't too dissimilar from how he worked before then, making interesting single hit sounds and banging them into a sampler.

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  • 1 year later...

Solved : http://sourceforge.net/p/playerpro/discussion/469514/thread/e6a639f3/?limit=25

"He said on his user18081971 account when asked about how Drukqs was
programmed: "mostly written in Playerpro for the mac, my fave tracker, wish
it would be brought back, had some amazing features and i helped code a
bunch of top dsp fx for it"

Edited by DvStcH
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Solved : http://sourceforge.net/p/playerpro/discussion/469514/thread/e6a639f3/?limit=25

"He said on his user18081971 account when asked about how Drukqs was

programmed: "mostly written in Playerpro for the mac, my fave tracker, wish

it would be brought back, had some amazing features and i helped code a

bunch of top dsp fx for it"

wow nice find never heard of that programm before !

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  • 1 year later...

Solved : http://sourceforge.net/p/playerpro/discussion/469514/thread/e6a639f3/?limit=25

"He said on his user18081971 account when asked about how Drukqs was

programmed: "mostly written in Playerpro for the mac, my fave tracker, wish

it would be brought back, had some amazing features and i helped code a

bunch of top dsp fx for it"

 

Let's resurrect this thread to include this video of Vordhosbn being played by PlayerPro:

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Scratch my post just above this one, I found Player Pro for Mac OS X.  4th entry on this page:

 

https://woolyss.com/tracking-trackers.php?s=Mac

 

 

On 2nd thought, I wonder if Rich would upload the complete Vord session for us to tinker with?

 

Pretty please, Rich :)

Edited by aDiscoBall
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I'll post this here too for the relevancy to the thread, Quote from daddy1 on the drukqs bleep store page:

 

fanks!

 

The reason this vid exists is because when my good friend Leila wanted to remix it, she asked if she could just have the melody without the drums, to make it easier to work out, so I thought be a nice little treat to make her a movie of it.

About PlayerPro though,Id like to write a chunk about that program.

 

Its very simple compared to modern things like Renoise BUT it had some advantages over it

Here’s the main things I loved about Playerpro. You could drag instruments from the list on the right, directly into the arrangement window, this alone makes writing things SO much faster than say Renoise and SO much more fun and less ballache.

I know you can play them in from the keyboard but you need both.

Next is if you right click a note in the arrangement window, you get a list of possible column functions/FX AND notes with octaves, This is a really fast and intuitive way to program and most importantly edit things you played in.

Ive tried in vain to make Renoise coders listen, help!

 

You could print plugin effects directly & destructively onto the sample, hence fr eeing up CPU but you could hear the effect first before you printed it.

I've really pecked several people to do this and it did get finally done in Renoise but its still not as accurate as PP, gain is not handled correctly last time i checked, Renoise has that great highlight part of the arrangement thing but the gain doesn’t get worked out properly when you have a bunch of fx, be top if this is fixed now?

The other reason this feature is so good and powerful is because most people these days setup EQs on each channel etc and they just sit there wasting CPU and most importantly the urge to carry on tweaking it always remains.

You would be amazed how it can train your brain to get it right the first time when you are forced to make a decision about EQ and then can’t change it, a bit like with a digital camera, you just take loads of shit pictures of the same thing instead of one thats right, I’m generalising.

But every sampler VST i’ve seen does this as well, its the wrong way to do it, all your plugins should be available in the sample editor to apply to samples, not on the mixer, well you need both.

I think its because in the beginning of audio on DAWS, coders were fixated about replicating real mixing desks and recording bands but this didn’t take into account the new way people were going to start using DAW's

But even if you can’t take that discipline you could just have an undo history on the sample..so you wouldn’t have to re EQ the EQ if it were wrong..you could also have an amazing cpu guzzling EQ on every sound.

It just doesn’t make any sense to have a live EQ on static samples..yet every DAW does this, unless I missed one? Ive checked all of them and they all do that..frustrating when everyone goes down the same wrong road.

Also helped code some really different sounding granular and FFT plugs for it which was the icing on the cake…

But it was really limited so would prefer those functions in Renoise rather than resurrecting good old PP.

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