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is it true Go Plastic by Squarepusher featured no computer wizardry?


PhylumZunami
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So the buffering effects and pitch slides are eventide? Cool. The QY700 is basically renoise sequencer in hardware? Lots of mental FM fkry in DYKS, Crazy to f with the fm so much and for it to sound so tuned if u know what i mean.  The swing in the beats...wonder if thats QY700 swing or programmed.

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Don't rule out the sampling playback power on the s6000.

Yeah and I was completely wrong on here a few years back when I was adamant it was a 'buffer override' effect he used (well not completely wrong, the result is the same - just the method is different): What he does for those 'buffer' glitch samples you hear in GP,DYKS, Ultravisitor are actually samples being retriggered at a really rapid rate (presumably through the s6000) and then the sample start time is then modulated to slide through the loop
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I love Go Plastic. It's been in my car since it came out. I've been remaking it on my computer ever since. I sometimes think about releasing a sequel, like James Cameron's Aliens.

 

Went Plastic

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Yea used to love doing that in Live. Renoise has no sample loop point manipulation yet although I'm sure theres some kind of work around.

It does, but you have to do it oldskool tracker style by using retrig and sample offset commands. It's much more controlled this way, but I like that. It's capable of some really tight granular/timestretching effects.

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Yea used to love doing that in Live. Renoise has no sample loop point manipulation yet although I'm sure theres some kind of work around.

It does, but you have to do it oldskool tracker style by using retrig and sample offset commands. It's much more controlled this way, but I like that. It's capable of some really tight granular/timestretching effects.

 

 

Yea I get that, but it doesn't have loop point modulation....start and end, crossfade. 

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Yea used to love doing that in Live. Renoise has no sample loop point manipulation yet although I'm sure theres some kind of work around.

It does, but you have to do it oldskool tracker style by using retrig and sample offset commands. It's much more controlled this way, but I like that. It's capable of some really tight granular/timestretching effects.

 

 

Yea I get that, but it doesn't have loop point modulation....start and end, crossfade.

 

there's a tool for that

 

http://forum.renoise.com/index.php/topic/41879-new-tool-30-loop-control/

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Don't rule out the sampling playback power on the s6000.

Yeah and I was completely wrong on here a few years back when I was adamant it was a 'buffer override' effect he used (well not completely wrong, the result is the same - just the method is different): What he does for those 'buffer' glitch samples you hear in GP,DYKS, Ultravisitor are actually samples being retriggered at a really rapid rate (presumably through the s6000) and then the sample start time is then modulated to slide through the loop

 

 

I'm trying to research into this sampler but I can't find a way to do what you describe. (modulate the starting point of the sample)

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I think I figured out it out. I found the sysex reference for the s6000 and apparently it's possible to control that was sysex. The QY700 can send exclusive messages directly inserted into the sequencer. (funny that modern sequencers don't have this ability, I can't find it on the cirklon, the pyramid, the octatrack...). I also think a lot of the effects were abusing the time stretch function on the s6000 in addition to the retrigger and starting point manipulation.

 

It would be nice if a more modern sampler were made that could accept CC for all these parameters.

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The QY700 can send exclusive messages directly inserted into the sequencer. (funny that modern sequencers don't have this ability, I can't find it on the cirklon, the pyramid, the octatrack...). I also think a lot of the effects were abusing the time stretch function on the s6000 in addition to the retrigger and starting point manipulation.

 

It would be nice if a more modern sampler were made that could accept CC for all these parameters.

MPC1000 can send sysex.

Korg volca sample responds to CCs for these parameters. Octatrack does too but there's a lag on start point unless you use the fader.

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Damn! that's actually pretty cool. I didn't know that the volca did that. I did know you could do some start point/break chopping stuff on them though.

 

Octatrack is my main sequencer, so I haven't really looked at whats needed to control it externally, that's good to know though.

 

This has actually inspired me to check out another coveted piece of gear (or in this case software). Right now I am trying to compile playerpro tracker and poke around with it (richard used it to make drukqs).

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This has actually inspired me to check out another coveted piece of gear (or in this case software). Right now I am trying to compile playerpro tracker and poke around with it (richard used it to make drukqs).

honestly, you're probably better off using Renoise, or if you want to get oldskool (and want something free) and only use samples, something like MilkyTracker. I can understand the novelty factor of using something RDJ used, but trackers are trackers, when you use them to sequence samples.

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Yeah I think Renoise takes a lot of the pain out of trackers and it also gives you some nice, unique modulation options. Besides MilkyTracker, Jeskola Buzz is nice too. That said I do think it can be a cool exercise to play around with a tool that you only know about based on music that was made with it - you can learn a lot about the mindset of its creator that way.

PM if you would like to chat about controlling the OT externally. I haven't found anything really good out there but I have some ideas and some means to implement them and I could use a kick in the ass to get some momentum. That goes for anyone interested, btw ;)

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This has actually inspired me to check out another coveted piece of gear (or in this case software). Right now I am trying to compile playerpro tracker and poke around with it (richard used it to make drukqs).

honestly, you're probably better off using Renoise, or if you want to get oldskool (and want something free) and only use samples, something like MilkyTracker. I can understand the novelty factor of using something RDJ used, but trackers are trackers, when you use them to sequence samples.

 

 

I love renoise, and i have come VERY close to emulating the drukqs beat-style and techniques using synth samples, drum samples, renoise and a few effects. I wouldn't dream of actually using that old piece of software for serious shit (I can't really use computers for music in general now anyways). It's mostly a curiosity thing. Especially richard's comment about creating some of the DSP algorithms for it and that it had some really unique features. Just wondering if there's anything that makes it special besides your standard tracker.

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Yeah I think Renoise takes a lot of the pain out of trackers and it also gives you some nice, unique modulation options. Besides MilkyTracker, Jeskola Buzz is nice too. That said I do think it can be a cool exercise to play around with a tool that you only know about based on music that was made with it - you can learn a lot about the mindset of its creator that way.

PM if you would like to chat about controlling the OT externally. I haven't found anything really good out there but I have some ideas and some means to implement them and I could use a kick in the ass to get some momentum. That goes for anyone interested, btw ;)

 

Buzz is amazing. I haven't used it in years, but it was my main weapon for a while.

 

I am considering eventually switching to a pyramid(or a cirklon) for sequencing for better polyphony support, but I think I would still end up using the sequencer on the OT to do OT stuff. Right now I am just trying to stretch the OT as far as I can, even though it can't handle overlapping notes properly on one track, makes my prophet 12 sad.

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This has actually inspired me to check out another coveted piece of gear (or in this case software). Right now I am trying to compile playerpro tracker and poke around with it (richard used it to make drukqs).

honestly, you're probably better off using Renoise, or if you want to get oldskool (and want something free) and only use samples, something like MilkyTracker. I can understand the novelty factor of using something RDJ used, but trackers are trackers, when you use them to sequence samples.

I love renoise, and i have come VERY close to emulating the drukqs beat-style and techniques using synth samples, drum samples, renoise and a few effects. I wouldn't dream of actually using that old piece of software for serious shit (I can't really use computers for music in general now anyways). It's mostly a curiosity thing. Especially richard's comment about creating some of the DSP algorithms for it and that it had some really unique features. Just wondering if there's anything that makes it special besides your standard tracker.

True, sorry if I may have come across as a bit dickish with my comment; it is after all a good idea to experiment with as much software as possible.. and as someone who makes chiptunes with obsolete handhelds, my comment was perhaps a little hypocritical hahah.
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