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shame, apparently there was a decent chance of it clearing up if only the window allowed them to wait for ten minutes, but it didn't.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/20/2020 at 11:20 AM, very honest said:

awesome. looks like you can see the remnants of a previously separate galaxy that has merged with the milky way. the central horizontal feature is the milky way, with sagitarius a in the middle.

 

<-

kindergarten question, Can you explain me how those pictures work or point me to some site? it's just like the picture on your avatar, how come is it round? 

 

Edit: ok I just read the article and this seems to be the explanation but still...

Quote

The map uses the so-called Aitoff projection, which unwraps the sphere of the sky on to an ellipse. The band across the middle is the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, with the centre of the galaxy in the middle of the ellipse

 

Edited by Tim_J
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25 minutes ago, Tim_J said:

kindergarten question, Can you explain me how those pictures work or point me to some site? it's just like the picture on your avatar, how come is it round? 

 

Edit: ok I just read the article and this seems to be the explanation but still...

 

oh interesting. my user image is different, then. it has half the sky sphere. it's just a long exposure photo, pointing straight up, with a fish-eye lens. shot by a guy named yuri beletsky and published by nasa. still one my favorites.

 

mw_5000m_beletsky1300.jpg

Edited by very honest
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  • 2 weeks later...

we've never seen anything from outside the perspective of the milky way. How can we see the whole milky way? 

Edited by marf
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Intense magnetism.

On 6/24/2020 at 12:02 PM, Tim_J said:

 

Quite enjoyed that. I always like watching/reading about the specific amount of time a day is.

And the nature of time in general, to be honest.

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The dwarf planet Ceres, the largest object in our Solar System’s main asteroid belt, once harbored a global subsurface ocean that likely froze solid long ago. Today, if any liquid water — a key requisite for habitability — still exists on Ceres, a good place to look for it is beneath the youngest of its large impact craters.

The data suggest that the impact that created the Occator crater 20 million years ago likely fractured Ceres’ crust, and those fractures today tap into deeper brine reservoirs. This hypothesis explains the formation of bright regions, or faculae, on the crater floor: brine erupted through these fractures, and a highly reflective salt crust was left behind as the water evaporated.

https://news.berkeley.edu/2020/08/10/dwarf-planet-ceres-has-reservoirs-of-salty-water/

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7722

ceres_white_spots_water_ocean.jpg?w=650&

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