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the sony hacking scandal


Rubin Farr
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I often nut out during professional emails.

 

I can see how JE would be concerned; it's mostly a worry for dissidents and/or psychonauts. If you're not shy about admitting it on a public forum then it shouldn't be too scary in your email, I suppose. But the possibility of being on a list somewhere for your beliefs or interests is pretty unentertaining.

dude I don't mean to be dickish, but I'm seriously shocked by the seemingly gigantic blind spot on display here. Here's an example, you practice a sexual fetish that may not necessarily be something society is accepting of. You try to get into a future relationship or employment situation and before you even go on your first date or get interviewed someone looks up your private email cache and finds out you are huge into piss-play or even more taboo you like being dressed in a diaper and shitting yourself, is the requirement as Chengod laid out being a 'adult' negate the embarrassment that could result in such an unwanted disclosure? I mean I don't feel like im saying something exclusive to me because I do political activism, which is part of why im having such a weird time understanding the responses.

 

smart employers and savvy potential mates know how to use google and a lot of the time can already find out embarrassing things about a person: things they've said on twitter, public facebook posts, even things like disquit or youtube comments if the person forgot to anonymize it. So that already exists, and if you aren't careful chances are you've already left a potentially embarrassing trail. But i mean seriously, everyone's entire gmail cache leaking onto the internet at the same time for *anybody* to see? I mean its a ridiculous hypothetical, I get that, but lets just pretend its real. How in the fucking fuck can anybody be ok with that premise? I literally do not believe chengod is serious thats close to the most extreme trolling I've ever seen anyone do on the forum

 

having no regrets is one thing, I think most people ideally would like to live that way. Having no requirement of privacy whatsoever about private sexual preferences ? I mean maybe porn stars obviously, very sex positive extroverted types possibly, but 99% of members on this forum? Fuck no.

 

I mean I must be crazy but I've had a lot of private and deeply personal conversations over gmail that I never want anyone to see beyond the person it was emailed to. And it's not out of having regrets or some kind of shame about my private life that would cause me to be upset that someone else saw that... does that make sense? please somebody just say : yeah that makes sense

Edited by John Ehrlichman
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Dude, if you practice it, embrace it. People are always saying on here - we need to embrace love and sexuality more, and downplay violence. I wonder if the goatse guy had to move out of his community or whatever - he was well identified.

Besides, if everyone's gmail cache is out there, you can guarantee those CEOs and their psycho-sexual fantasies are all over the place. And those are the guys that are really deep into it - so arm yourself with all the knowledge you can.

 

And again - how many people are gonna spend the time to look up your private e-mail conversations.

 

Look, I'm not saying breaching privacy is a good thing. I'm saying it's not the end of the world scenario that some people seem to be making it out to be. Yeah your wife might divorce you, your parents might lecture you about how letting that homosexual suck your dick was not the way they brought you up blah blah blah. But those risks existed before this hypothetical gmail breach. Company fires you for scat play in the privacy of your own home? Sue them for discrimination.

 

And the whole key to this is: the gawker headline referred to the sony hack as "goddamn terrifying". At the time, I thought they were referring to the e-mails, because I didn't know (and still don't know) what the hackers got. The e-mails, again, I'm sorry, but be goddamned professional in your work e-mails, and you don't have to worry about it. Work e-mails should not cause huge scandal and the collapse of careers. If the hackers got medical records and financial records, shit like that, it's a bigger deal. But again, this is Sony and those incompetent fucks in their IT department (remember the 2011 sony root-kit fiasco?). So we'll probably never know the true depth of the costs to Sony.

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all I can say is wow.

 

no wonder we're heading into a seriously scary place to live.

 

funny how I've recently just been watching Black Mirror lately, and in particular the 3rd episode of series 1 "The Entire History Of You" outlines a scenario that, while not exactly similar in a verbatim manner, is close enough that it's quite disquieting.

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doent woree cen, az ie staeted bfor in ae mor kloekt but ledjibl and leSs in dleet manr, mie imprequn iz xat heez in xe proeseSs ovf caenjing hiz keyword/sentence/tone/ profile. It's all good. If you can't beat 'em, decoy them, heh.

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how you want to bang a thai ladyboy

 

you are huge into piss-play or even more taboo you like being dressed in a diaper and shitting yourself

 

how letting that homosexual suck your dick

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_association_%28psychology%29#Freudian_approach

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Guest Atom Dowry Firth

does that make sense? please somebody just say : yeah that makes sense

 

Yeah that makes sense :)

 

It never fails to depress me when people wheel out this idea that if you don't have anything to hide there isn't a problem with having your privacy invaded. What we're talking about here is essentially the same as someone breaking into your house, rummaging through all your personal belongings, going through your underwear drawer, looking through your photo albums and making copies of them all, cloning your credit card etc. etc. I don't think there are many people that would actually be OK with that scenario because they feel like they don't have anything to hide? Most people would feel really violated, helpless and frightened if that happened to them - pretty traumatic shit really.

 

I can see where Chen is coming from in that if you're aware of the threat then you probably already practice a fair amount of self editing online and you're pretty careful with what you post and even what you send in emails to people. But the thing is, people like us that grew up with the internet and are at least vaguely tech savvy are a very small minority of the people that use the internet on a daily basis. A lot of people probably never envisaged hacking like this even being possible when they signed up for their email/social media/instagram or whatever profiles. The prospect of a hacker or group of hackers targeting an email cache is extreme, but it's not even as extreme as it could be. Why stop there? What about instant messenger logs? People are way more flippant and personal on IM than they are in emails. How about picture messages sent over mobile networks? How about all private images ever uploaded to instagram/photobucket? Snapchat? There are probably millions of users that have uploaded all kinds of stuff they don't want aired in public. Probably millions of them being teenagers and possibly even children too. I'm sure in light of this breach of privacy there are parents everywhere that are concerned about the implications other breaches of data in the future may have. Job prospects evapourating overnight. Social ridicule. People killing themselves because of something like that happening is sadly a very real possibility. If you look at it from that point of view, a headline with the word 'terrifying' in it really isn't that far from the truth at all, at least for the vast majority of internet users today.

 

And it doesn't even stop there (potentially at least). America, most parts of Europe, Australia, Japan etc - these places have a much greater sense of personal liberty than much of the rest of the world. There are plenty of countries today where sexuality, kinks and political ideologies that deviate from those dictated by the state are punishable by death. A hack of this magnitude in regions like that could have extremely horrific ramifications indeed. Even in America and the UK there is still discrimination based on sexuality etc. Gay actors still pretend to be straight in Hollywood even today for fear of their career taking a nosedive if they came out in public. There are so many scenarios where ordinary people who are fully developed as adults would find a breach of security like this frightening.

 

The problem is, this technology is so new that society is still in the process of figuring it all out and adapting with it. Perhaps in 100 years once the internet has been around for a few generations people will have adapted their behaviour so that if a breach happens the knock on effects will be minimal, they'll just roll their eyes and get on with it. Perhaps everyone including big multinational corporations will have finally started taking the threat seriously to the point of having half decent security in place? Who knows. We're not there yet though.

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how you want to bang a thai ladyboy

 

you are huge into piss-play or even more taboo you like being dressed in a diaper and shitting yourself

 

how letting that homosexual suck your dick

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_association_%28psychology%29#Freudian_approach

 

 

Can't speak for JE, but I write only from experience ;)

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Ever send dick pics to girls? Could have been a catfish account by a guy wearing antlers and a red nose, "Santa Clause" breathing down his neck while he peruses your pics and eats Jello rape pudding. This guy is also a local police officer with a wife and kids. Nothing is what it seems in these modern cyberpunk revolutionary sociopolitical mindfuck times we live in holmes and you got to watch your back but it's best to watch your front cuz it's the niggas that front that be pullin stunts

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most people would not be subject to scrutiny of this kind at least in the UK as luckily there are data protection laws which are intended to protect our civil liberties (or something like that). i've taken extensive training around this and happen to work within a government department. even in the case of the police investigating a crime, there is quite a lot of red tape involved in getting access to things like peoples emails and internet history. (i posted the details on here previously when the initial story about changes in the law happened but i can't seem to find it now). basically any information gathered without a warrant is useless as it cannot be used in a court of law. such a case would also run the risk of being thrown out of court despite other evidence.

 

the main people who you need to be concerned about are people operating out side the law (apart from the US in which case you're screwed, the only think preventing the government from reading everything is the sheer manpower and there for cost involved http://www.radicati.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Email-Statistics-Report-2013-2017-Executive-Summary.pdf) like yes the people involved in the sony hacking and even more worryingly (which no one seems to have registered) the ordinary people who had their emails and phones hacked by the press. for some reason this seems to get swept under the carpet even when it involves the familys of missing children. even today the metro reported that the UKIP MP Neil Hamilton had his emails hacked and reported the contents of them. how are these people immune to the law? it seems to be a part of the normal mode of operation.

 

i just don't get how this is acceptable/allowed to go on.

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Kaz Hirai you chickenshit motherfucker , grow a goddamn backbone! Decision by committee, as is the Nippon tradition. Pathetic cowards.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/movies/sony-ceo-toned-down-assassination-scene-in-the-105269262047.html

 

yeah because, you know, trying to use soft power to help ease geo-political concerns in the region wouldn't do at all.

 

And yes Japanese CEOs are like paragons of virtue compared to their North American (and some european) counterparts.

http://inequality.org/americas-ceos-class/

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Gay actors still pretend to be straight in Hollywood even today for fear of their career taking a nosedive if they came out in public. There are so many scenarios where ordinary people who are fully developed as adults would find a breach of security like this frightening.

thanks for being a voice of reason, you raise a lot of important points I wasn't able to articulate. I mean this alone could be devastating, I'm surprised nothing in the emails so far has anything of this type in it. Even just movie execs privately joking back and forth about Tom Cruise or Travolta being gay, but maybe we just haven't seen it yet.

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dissidents and/or psychonauts.

dude I don't mean to be dickish, but I'm seriously shocked by the seemingly gigantic blind spot on display here.

No, you're absolutely right. Sexuality and confusing thoughts/feelings are something I am generally private about, and I'm sure there are hundreds of other valid cases. I value privacy a great deal. You're not being a dick, you've just thought about this more and are probably less tired than me.

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there are a million ways this kind of stuff could fuck over almost anyone. all it takes is a little thought, and you can think of more ways to add to that list. blackmail, deciphering passwords to accounts by reading through emails to find names of pets/schools/etc, even finding what and where those accounts are, scaring people into not having conversations they'd like to have ('chilling'), creating complex databases that can cross reference various points of info to create comprehensive profiles on a person, or on a group of people, which can then be used against them in various ways, cyber/irl bullying/trolling (of kids or adults, some % of which would commit suicide or just become depressed), outting people for this or that thing they want kept secret, as JE mentioned employers could look through your private conversations like they already do your facebook, so could someone you went on a date with or want to, etc

 

those are some of the easy ones, im sure someone smarter could add more to that list, and im sure that as the future unfolds, new technologies or societal/economical/etc developments could spawn even more.

 

i agree with you chen that yeah this stuff is here and you have to be aware of it. but i feel like just stating that and saying something like 'as long as we dont threaten the gov with bombs were ok' is kind of fatalistic/defeatist and the more we accept this the worse it's going to get. i know lots of people think anonymous are some internet super heros but the truth is that if you accept what they are doing just because you agree that this or that target theyve gone after are scum, then you are basically saying that you think people you don't like shouldn't have the same right to not being hacked as you probably think you are entitled to. like i said, im not a fan of hollywood but if i denied that this was fucked up for them, i'd be a hypocrite to complain if it ever happened to me, because some anonymous group of clowns who lurk in the shadows and who nobody elected to their role of administering their personal idea of justice, finally turned on me and decided i was the bad guy to fuck with.

 

long story short i think the gov(s) should start nailing these kinds of hackers to the cross if/when they catch them, to make examples of them. (assuming they aren't the or a gov themselves...)

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yeh ya know, your post made me remember that, even though i'd like to see these hacker groups get punished hard for doing this shit, because i feel like what they are doing is going to lead to chaos and its going to ruin lives and even get some people killed, i also think the gov in all its various manifestations are just as disgusting. so my saying i'd like to see 'the gov' nail the hackers to the cross, well that's in an ideal world where 'the gov' cares about their supposed role of governing for the people and not themselves also spying on the people/fucking with the people just like the hackers themselves are doing.

 

as it is i dont feel like the US or any gov has any moral authority to nail hackers to the cross for doing the same exact kind of shit they are doing themselves. and it just illustrates how fucked up things are

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Hey again, just we're all on the same page here:

 

I'm all for privacy, and I don't think anyone should be hacking huge databases that contain the private info of large swathes of the population.

 

What I'm saying - and this is all I'm saying - is that for 99.9% of the population, this wouldn't be terrifying at all.

Because of apathy and the general vanillaness of every day life.

 

Apathy

How many people are going to bother going through all of [email protected] to try and link it to my real identity?

Or my other 4 gmail accounts?

I mean wikileaks is well known, has been widely reported upon, had two or three goddamned movies made about it/Julian Assange, and yet I wonder how many people on here (and yes, I do consider people on here a little more inquisitive than people who aren't into more obscure forms of music) have gone into great detail in their examination of Wikileaks?

And I can assure you my personal email accounts are far far far less interesting than wikileaks.

 

Vanillaness

How many people are really really into infantalism, and how many of them stand to lose a lot because of that secret being revealed?

The goatse guy lost a lot, but he's also been strangely liberated by his identity being revealed (he can gape his ass outdoors at his new house apparently). And he willingly put thousands of photos of himself online, back in the days of the internet before it was all memeified clickbait.

 

 

Which, I suppose is what I'm really complaining about; the sensationalism of just about everything now.

Everything is "terrifying", or "you won't believe what happened next", or any other sort of clickbait.

 

Also I'm an old, grumpy fuckwad, so I just like complaining.

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Here's the Kim Jong Un death scene that Kaz Hirai had edited down, I think it's a fitting end to that fat fucker.

 

http://defamer.gawker.com/leaked-watch-the-kim-jong-un-death-scene-sony-is-terri-1671454669?utm_source=recirculation&utm_medium=recirculation&utm_campaign=tuesdayAM

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I see your point Chen but I stand much closer to JE on this one.

 

I saw firsthand the extreme effort that went into surveillance of Occupy in nyc, and that was just what was visible from the street. Occupy is a nonviolent protest movement - basically the idealogical child of what America was founded on. I believe those people (and possibly myself just for being around, even in a documentary capacity) are marked for life, at least inside certain agencies, for trying to make their country a better place.

 

My biggest fear in surveillance culture is that there could be future politicians in that bunch who could make real changes but will have their private embarrassments revealed. It's not the surveillance itself, but who controls it, and how it can be abused.

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