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Name that break


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I've always wanted to know what the main break in prime audio soup by meat beat manifesto was. Seems to be a rare occasion where google doesn't seem to help, so it may not be a known. Anyone stumbled across it before?

Meat Beat Manifesto - Prime Audio Soup:

 

It's been augmented with separate ride and tamb breaks, you can hear 8 bars of the break I want without the others at around 3.20

 

This can be a generic name that break thread if you like. Cheers!

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I've always wanted to know what the main break in prime audio soup by meat beat manifesto was. Seems to be a rare occasion where google doesn't seem to help, so it may not be a known. Anyone stumbled across it before?

Meat Beat Manifesto - Prime Audio Soup:

 

It's been augmented with separate ride and tamb breaks, you can hear 8 bars of the break I want without the others at around 3.20

 

This can be a generic name that break thread if you like. Cheers!

 

I don't recognize that as a specific break. The kicks and snares sound like they're from The Stone Roses - Fool's Gold and the tambourines are from Lynn Collins - Think (About It). I can't really make out the underlying break, which is what you seem to be after.

 

probably an obvious one, but in the interest of keeping this thread going:

 

that really gritty snare/tom fill at the end of every 4 bars or so in this... 0:25 for a clear example

 

 

That is MC Duke - I'm Riffin'. The other break is Lyn Collins - Think (About It)

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probably an obvious one, but in the interest of keeping this thread going:

 

that really gritty snare/tom fill at the end of every 4 bars or so in this... 0:25 for a clear example

 

Hey, it may or may not be the very opening fill of take me to mardi gras by Bob james. If it isn't, you can cut that fill so it sounds identical to the one you're after

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I've always wanted to know what the main break in prime audio soup by meat beat manifesto was. Seems to be a rare occasion where google doesn't seem to help, so it may not be a known. Anyone stumbled across it before?

Meat Beat Manifesto - Prime Audio Soup:

 

It's been augmented with separate ride and tamb breaks, you can hear 8 bars of the break I want without the others at around 3.20

 

This can be a generic name that break thread if you like. Cheers!

I don't recognize that as a specific break. The kicks and snares sound like they're from The Stone Roses - Fool's Gold and the tambourines are from Lynn Collins - Think (About It). I can't really make out the underlying break, which is what you seem to be after.

probably an obvious one, but in the interest of keeping this thread going:

 

that really gritty snare/tom fill at the end of every 4 bars or so in this... 0:25 for a clear example

 

That is MC Duke - I'm Riffin'. The other break is Lyn Collins - Think (About It)

Hadn't seen this before I posted- yeah it's that mc Duke tune, never heard that before. Cool :)

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ahhhh.., see i saw i'm riffin mentioned on whosampled but it was linked to a non-related time so i actually thought maybe it was that "i'm the one" bit from the second half.

 

is that the original source of the break though? seems unlikely that a british MC was sourcing his own drum recordings in 1989.

 

It is a second generation breakbeat. A lot of hardcore breakbeat uses breaks taken from that era of hip hop. That is definitely the source for that break, but that break was constructed out of other breaks and drumsounds by the producer, Simon Harris.

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ahhhh.., see i saw i'm riffin mentioned on whosampled but it was linked to a non-related time so i actually thought maybe it was that "i'm the one" bit from the second half.

 

is that the original source of the break though? seems unlikely that a british MC was sourcing his own drum recordings in 1989.

 

It is a second generation breakbeat. A lot of hardcore breakbeat uses breaks taken from that era of hip hop. That is definitely the source for that break, but that break was constructed out of other breaks and drumsounds by the producer, Simon Harris.

 

 

Yeah I was going to say, there's a really good chance it's not only sampled from hip-hop breaks and "breaks and beats" vinyl but also 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. generation cassette tapes and DATs with breakbeats. Lot of producers were cutting up and slicing breakbeats into new combinations, some of which ended up being as much of staple as the original breakbeat sources. Really arbitrary standards emerged from equipment limits too: like the E-Mu SP-1200's time limits forced producers to mess around with playing 33 1/3 records at 45rpm then pitch-shifting them down to get more sampling time, creating a now trademark gittty sound of a lot of late 80s/early 90s hip-hop. The "amen break" was most often used not from the source but from the slowed down "Breaks and Beats" record which is why it sounds the way it does in many early uses ("Straight Out of Compton" is a good example). Jungle and drum n' bass utilized the hell out of the Akai S1000's time-stretch abilities.

 

For example, FSOL's "Papua New Guinea" break is from a slew of samples:

 

 

The original mix notably samples the bassline from Meat Beat Manifesto's proto-jungle track "Radio Babylon", the tambourine from Bobby Byrd's "Hot Pants - I'm Coming, I'm Coming, I'm Coming", vocals of Lisa Gerrard's singing lifted from the Dead Can Dance song "Dawn of the Iconoclast", from their 1987 album 'Within the Realm of a Dying Sun' and "Shelter Me" by Circuit.

 

From Sound On Sound interview:

 

 

 

"The drums were pulled from all over the place," says Dougans. "There were about four loops from various people, there was a big, fat bass drum that we always used which was stuck in a giant reverb, and quite a lot of the dubs — the seagull sound, the backwards whoosh — were all coming off stuff that I had done years before, sampled off a cassette and spun backwards. We both had big bags of samples and dubs and noises, and we would both just go in and sprinkle them over things that we were doing."

"We work together but we don't necessarily work at the same time," adds Cobain. "There's the push and the pull and then the exhaustion, and when I exhaust, Brian's strong, and vice-versa. That's how all good couples collaborate. When one person's depressed, the other is up, and we're much like that to this day, very yin and yang. Anyway, after I was exhausted on 'Papua New Guinea', the track was done and I thought it was great, Brian knew it could be so much better and he therefore brought in these breaks and did a load more sampling, and at that point we began writing again. My bass line fell by the wayside — it was crap, too middle-y and Brian said it needed to be bassier, so I pulled out the Meat Beat Manifesto bass line, and we chopped that up and added it.

"With 'Papua New Guinea' we got to the stage where everybody thought it was brilliant, but then Brian added a break halfway through that comes with some of that exotic tribal percussion as well as a flute that he sampled. He pitched it +12 and ­12, and we did that a lot — if a sample sounds good at +12 and ­12 you just follow them on so that it kind of becomes the same sample. Or even turn it backwards and just make the sample a bit more exotic. So, we did a bit of that, dropped the drums out, brought in some percussion, and at that point it was brilliant but it needed more. I was exhausted with the track, but Brian went in just one more time and we ended up developing a kind of middle eight. At that point I piled in there with this JX3P line which rose to a sort of crescendo with the middle-eight, basically like a sequence, and then we brought in this vocal that was sampled from I-don't-know-where.

"We didn't really hang around on tracks. We used to work two, three, four days, and I think 'Papua New Guinea' was the longest we ever worked on a track — we worked on it for about a week solid, and it just kept coming and Brian kept pushing. So, we fired in that voice sample, which was from a male session vocalist who'd come in and done some stuff, and the bass came in really late. We always hated bass lines that came late because it's very difficult to squeeze a bass in. People had already been saying, 'This is a fantastic track,' and we were like, 'Yeah, great, but the bass line's shit. What are we gonna do?' And it was a little bit of a squeeze, but it worked."

 

I remember similar things being said about Aphex Twin's Polynomial-C break, it was probably a mix of sources. Interesting backstory emerged from this question about a [Global Goon track.](http://forum.watmm.com/topic/79069-global-goon-crudulus-tm-whats-the-break-called/) mentioning that he used breaks that RDJ gave him via cassette.

Edited by joshuatx
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3:26 or whatever - whenever it sounds like ACTUAL DRUMS

 

That's a few different drum breaks that come in with the occasional crash cymbal or hi hats layered over from time to time.

 

 

The Honeydrippers - Impeach The President

Carleen & The Groovers - Can We Rap

Cold Grits - It's Your Thing

 

God knows what else.

 

The first Venetian Snares you posted just sounds like something constructed out of a sampled drum kit, not a break.

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