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Cheetah EP


ilqx hermolia xpli
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  • 2 weeks later...

Take a moment to appreciate how fucking good the intro music to Robocop on the Spectrum is. 

 

Used to dance around my parent's dining room to that.

 

and here's The robocop 3, probably my favorite 8bit classic

 

 

good stuff

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  • 2 weeks later...

CHEETAHT2 shows up Pitchfork's Top 100 Tracks of 2016 list at #49.  

 

http://pitchfork.com/features/lists-and-guides/9981-the-100-best-songs-of-2016/?page=6

 

 

 

We’re not used to hearing Aphex Twin dole out slow-motion, four-to-the-floor beats—and at just 100 BPM, “CHEETAHT2 [Ld spectrum]” dips about as low as techno is inclined to go. But that sullen andante trudge allows the British electronic musician to get the most out of the unusual instrument that the song pays homage to, and which he presumably used to record it: the Cheetah MS800, a digital synthesizer known for its woozy timbres (and once described as “the most difficult instrument to program on the planet). Here, that translates to background pads that shimmer like a heat mirage, and a midrange bass melody that writhes like a greased pig on ice. It’s unusual to hear Aphex Twin strip his tracks down like this, but that focus on the texture of his sounds—and few producers know how to program a synthesizer quite like he does—ends up making this no-frills record one of his most immediately satisfying releases in ages. 

 

And on their 20 Best Electronic Albums of 2016 list too:

 

http://pitchfork.com/features/lists-and-guides/9990-the-20-best-electronic-albums-of-2016/

 

 

 

His formerly hermetic tendencies now firmly a thing of the past, Richard D. James continues his hot streak, dusting off two woozy, low-slung tracks from his famous SoundCloud dump and assembling an entire EP around them. Building the release around the sounds of the Cheetah MS800—described by one enthusiast as “one of the most unfathomable instruments ever made”—James makes the most of the obscure digital synthesizer’s mutable wavetable technology, slowing the tempo, stripping down the beats, and zeroing in on gelatinous timbres. The slow tempos and straight-ahead tones make for what, at first, seems like one of his most uncomplicated releases in ages—but direct your attention just right, and, as with a “Magic Eye” image, a world of detail comes snapping into focus.
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Did we all agree that the 1st two tracks were to be listened to at 45rpm? I tried it and they sound even better to my ears.

Haven't tried it, but I can't imagine the mellow beats of LD Spectrum going any faster tbh...

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Did we all agree that the 1st two tracks were to be listened to at 45rpm? I tried it and they sound even better to my ears.

Haven't tried it, but I can't imagine the mellow beats of LD Spectrum going any faster tbh...

 

 

try it ;)

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