Jump to content

Recommended Posts

it's become an obsession of mine; folklore tapes, a year in the country, penny dreadful, ghost box, 1602 angela, hauntologists, mordant music, oz, wicca, salem, paganism, tarot, blackhill transmitter, eyedoublecross, the wicker man, what else ya got? let's go down this rabbit hole together. educate me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 212
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I had no idea "Hauntology" was a term that had any weight beyond some whimsical nonsense, and I've read a good amount of the articles here at work (can't watch videos or listen to anything though). 

Avebury is over-run with tourists most days, if you get the chance go there on a weekday.....cosmic as fuck maaaaaaaan (if you’re really unlucky you might stumble upon Julian Cope holding court).

Haven't seen this mentioned here, it's already a year old - from Richard Littler of Scarfolk fame. The soundtrack was just released on Castles in Space.  

Posted Images

Blood On Satan's Claw, The Witchfinder General and A Field in England are essential films, got into this myself not too long ago so fingers crossed this thread will reveal some cool stuff. I found this Guardian article is a good source for recommendations too.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/apr/10/eeriness-english-countryside-robert-macfarlane

 

If I remember correctly kaini knows this shit, hopefully he'll stumble upon the thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

it's become an obsession of mine; folklore tapes, a year in the country, penny dreadful, ghost box, 1602 angela, hauntologists, mordant music, oz, wicca, salem, paganism, tarot, blackhill transmitter, eyedoublecross, the wicker man, what else ya got? let's go down this rabbit hole together. educate me.

 

I read CS Lewis' space trilogy years back and it's actually how I stumbled upon the "Belbury Poly" reference. Odd sci-fi books but enjoyable.

 

As much as I dig this stuff I like toward hauntology in a broad sense, not the Anglocentric rural wryd dystopian stuff exclusively. I like "future past" aesthetics and ethos in general.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the movie recommends, I have Witch Finder, that I found to be overrated, which sux bc I love Vincent Price, and I downloaded A Field in England, been on my to do list for while.

 

Anyone interested in the Lucifer TV series in the Fall? This is the Vertigo version of the character, from The Sandman comics. I'm hoping if it's successful, he might show up in the Sandman film.

lucifer.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also winding my way thru Penny Dreadful season 2. Episode 3 with the old witch (whom I've read was Joan of Arc) making her around 400 yrs old, was maybe the best episode of the series so far. It was a flashback episode, so almost completely self-contained, with a classic tragic ending.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...

Picked up my first ghost box today, the popular P-SB7 w/ DAS108 speaker. Can't wait to try it out, I swear this keyboard is haunted. I type shit out and nothing, then maybe 30 sec. to a min. later it types out a bunch of nonsense not even close to what I typed. Wired keyboard, so no dead batteries, but lots of dead souls inside methinks. I ain't 'fraid of no ghost.

0CB796A1-DC76-41A4-A885-71E2DCB52BDE_zps

Link to post
Share on other sites

blackhill transmitter

 

The vinyl edition of Synth A is my FSOLDigital hauntology highlight.

 

Couple of great BBC moments from the '70s: TV movie The Stone Tape and kids sci-fi drama The Changes (also notable for its theme being sampled by FSOL. I can crowbar them in everywhere lol). 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sampled quite a lot of '70s BBC stuff on this record from a few years ago, was on a total hauntology kick at the time: https://tanizaki.bandcamp.com/album/ouroboros

 

This is an interesting read if witchy occult shenanigans are yer thing, bit of a grab-bag but some interesting stuff

nonetheless: 

 

http://www.lulu.com/gb/en/shop/folk-horror-revival/folk-horror-revival-field-studies/paperback/product-22498164.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I rewatched 'Sapphire & Steel' recently. Very odd early 80s UK supernatural drama. More unsettling than I remember it as a kid. I spent most of my time back then behind the sofa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These were originally correctly labeled, but there was a leak from the time corridor and parts one and six got swapped around.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sampled quite a lot of '70s BBC stuff on this record from a few years ago, was on a total hauntology kick at the time: https://tanizaki.bandcamp.com/album/ouroboros

 

This is an interesting read if witchy occult shenanigans are yer thing, bit of a grab-bag but some interesting stuff

nonetheless:

 

http://www.lulu.com/gb/en/shop/folk-horror-revival/folk-horror-revival-field-studies/paperback/product-22498164.html

Good release dude, I pitched in a quid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bizarre synchronicity here, as i recently named some mixes with the title "Rabbit Hole".....make of that what you will

 

Overall, the dearth of sampling certain realms of tv/docu programming has run its course a bit imho, i mean how many 70's tv shows could folks actually reference? Eg: Tales of the Unexpected was infinitely more out there than the more kitschy Sapphire n Steel.......

 

Isnt it more fun to reach beyond a specific decade like the 70's? There are far more resources out there & lashings of weird atmospheric gear to hunt down.....films like The Innocents had incredible sound design. Watch it with quadraphonic sound in a dark room at night and the "rooms.....like dark woods" quote will manifest directly in your soul.

 

Throbbing Gristle's soundtrack to a compilation of various Derek Jarman 8mm short filems, In the Shadow of the Sun, is an audio-visual feast of occult goings on. Read any resource around Jarman's interest in magic & you'll soon find it was these short 8mm works that were his true "vocation". The soundtrack ebbs away a bit, but the start phase is immense and 1 of my fave TG works plus the vid rrrrocks too, just skip to 2mins 44secs for the opening:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GN3Tibs-R8

 

 

Andrew Liles pretty much owns this field w/out even really trying. In interviews he claims and states a clear avoidance of attaching hocus-pocus intent in his work, but the atmospherics he can produce in certain tracks are mind-bendingly bonkers.

 

My personal favourites are, first & foremost, "Is There Anybody There?"......to use the word haunt would be a tad lazy, otherworldly might be more accurate tag. I dunno how the fuck he created this, but its utterly utterly compelling:

 

http://andrewliles.bandcamp.com/track/is-there-anybody-there-binaural-mix

 

Check his contribution to a Nurse With Wound track, fittingly titled "The Golden Age of Telekinesis (Early Mix)":

 

 

his "Anhedonia" is sublime:

 

 

his "The Last Few Minutes of a Lonely Life" has more subtle melody even if its warmth is where the truly disturbing elements really exist:

 

https://andrewliles.bandcamp.com/track/the-last-few-minutes-of-a-lonely-life-or-goodbye-mr-pips

 

 

Would add various bits with anything related to the engineering skills of Integrated Circuit Record's Colin Potter, specifically works by Andrew Chalk, Darren Tate & J Coleclough.... far more fun if you just plow into their catalogs in your own time.

 

The Hafler Trio also manage to conjure sounds that few get close to. What Andrew McKenzie's specific intentions are remain a bit of a mystery, but if you can filter thru the more pretentious silence-spaced clicks n guff theres a sub-surface of atmospherics that touch on something where words n descriptions start to break down. I used a bunch of his records for the start of this mix, cos they absolutely nailed the sounds & echoes of the long empty hospital corridors where my Dad was seeing out the last days of a terminal illness:

 

https://soundcloud.com/cwmbran-city/velindre-journeys

 

 

Plus lets not phoget any audio you can find by William Burroughs, cos that bloke grasped the true nature of reality better than most & if you've caned TG, Psychic TV, Coil or numerous other sound pioneers over the years, his influence remains critical.

Edited by cwmbrancity
Link to post
Share on other sites

ps: would highly recommend select chapters from this superb anthology of all things strange (the 2nd edition with the red cover, rather than the 1st edition/black covered version)

 

theres loads of bollix, so you have to steer the ship quite well or get scuppered by folks like 2012-enthusiasts like Pinchbeck, but the Austin Osman Spare, Crowley, Burroughs & Gysin sections are f*ckin mint:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Book-Lies-New-Disinformation-Magick/dp/1938875109/ref=dp_ob_title_bk

 

and if you enjoy the likes of this, go further down the rabbit holes with "Austin Osman Spare - The Occult Life of London's Legendary Artist" by Phil Baker, "The Magical Universe of William Burroughs" by Matthew Levi-Stevens (its all in this one folks) & "Psychomagic - The Transformative Power of Shamanic Psychotherapy" by none other than Alejandro Jodorowsky......the latter is like a fire-side chat with 1 of the world's most innovative film makers on his various methodologies and its routes in S American shamanism & not the vagaries espoused by the likes of Castaneda either.

Link to post
Share on other sites

fkn edits aaaaaggggggghhhhhhhh

 

sampled The Innocents on this mix quite a bit, cos it has that whispering, barely audible voice work that a lot of modern "horror" filems could learn a lot from, suggestion rather than implication, settling into deeply uneasy

 

https://soundcloud.com/cwmbran-city/gibbering-heights

Link to post
Share on other sites

using personalities & their voices to change the point of reference over to something wtf, you could subvert things/shake it up

 

eg: imagine being on a bad trip while listening to David Bellamy

 

 

or The Krankies, shudder, wont do that now retrocreepology

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

using personalities & their voices to change the point of reference over to something wtf, you could subvert things/shake it up

 

eg: imagine being on a bad trip while listening to David Bellamy

 

 

or The Krankies, shudder, wont do that now retrocreepology

 

David Bellamy opened up a building at my primary school and got us all, teachers and parents included, to lie on the floor and pretend we were a seed that was growing into a tree. Geezer. My secondary school had a building opened by Kriss Akabusi and my parents had a photo of him and my brother on their mantelpiece for years. 

 

Anyway, have you seen Robin Redbreast? It's very good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

so not everything listed in that post or this thread is "hauntology" by definition, but whatever. i think if you're just looking for "pastoral horror" there are plenty of films and books. arthur machen is the grandaddy.

william gibson's story "the gernsback continuum" seems to be a precursor to derrida's idea of hauntology, although gibson's story isn't about "marxist ghosts" or whatever, more the afterimage of a long gone cultural artifact literally haunting someone. actually most of gibson's stuff is related to hauntology, if not explicitly part of it. china mieville also writes about this in "the city and the city".

Edited by keanu reeves
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

would recommend Christopher Partridge's "The Lyre of Orpheus" for a read brimming with ideas, theory & masses of case studies, if this kind of thing floats yer boat

 

its scope is wide enough for interdisciplinary parallels & specific enough to explore music, the sacred & the profane (or propane if you're Little Carmine)

 

its v good for a full interpretative analysis of how & why such themes manifest in individual/collective psyches, the only thing it really misses is a chapter on archaeology & antiquarianism

 

another cracking read is "Landmarks" by Robert Macfarlane, a linguistic exploration of landscapes, place-names & Britain/Eire, if water-filled archaeological dig trenches get u aroused

 

https://www.google.co.uk/#safe=off&q=landmarks+robert+macfarlane

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Uros
      Also will have this track already released on L.I.E.S. 2020 promo comp:
      Limited cassette already out, few copies still available: https://liesrecords.com/products/ye-gods-dumah-cassette-lies-157
      Vinyl and digitals will be on Bandcamp: https://liesrecords.bandcamp.com/music
      Have kept my eyes on this and really stoked this is about to hit BC soon. His earlier release on Panzerkreuz was solid. Even Rich approved and included a track from it to his Printworks set. Digitals here:

       
    • By ShammenDelly
      Hi Folks
      It's been a long time since I posted here. I wanted to share something new I've been working on, a new EP I just released on May 1st that I hope people here would really enjoy. 
      This is a vivid reimagined vision of a time when Irish Country legend Big Tom and his Mainliners were leaders of 'The Peoples Temple' in Monaghan back in the late 70's and would travel around the country summoning new followers for the sacred dances around stone circles and beaches. His followers would come down the Four Country Roads in droves, the Smithwicks would be flowing and be tainted with thee auwl Magick Mushroomz, the masses would be waltzing and jiving around large fires howling to the skies as the sun rises as the big beat keeps on thumping.

      The music in this EP is a mixutre of old and new music Shammen Delly produced in his 'Dunge' up north in Donegal, which sounds like a surreal noise fest of oneric distorted whirling warbly synth chords and thoughts of 70's German Krautrock emotional mellotrons, blending in hidden country bass lines, and a wash of psychedelic industrialistic rhythms and downtempo decrepit trip-hop big beats, and organic recordings of piano,harmonium, and personal tape recordings from Friel's family members throughout the past taken from an old tape the producers mother recorded when she was a kid.
      There's a tapemix I made from Tascam Portastudio 424mkIII sessions titled 'An Evocation to Tonduff' for your listening pleasure also. 
      Listen/Buy here: https://shammendelly.bandcamp.com/album/the-peoples-temple-ov-big-tom

    • By fumi
      Out tomorrow.
      LP Released by Castles in Space on Red and Yellow Vinyl. 
      Sleeve notes by Jim Jupp (Ghostbox Records) 
      Douglas E Powell voice/vocals on track 9 Speak your piece. 
      Keith Seatman’s music is an anachronistically repurposed assemblage of sounds, melodies and technologies plundered from different time zones. Perhaps no surprise as he lives and records a stone’s throw from the jaded, yet jaunty seafront of Southsea in Portsmouth on the south coast of England. This album however is far from being a haphazard and spontaneous collage. Keith’s busy and dense soundworld is composed though a very deliberate and painstaking process. Unlikely musical and sonic juxtapositions artfully evoke a sense of place and narrative. This latest excursion is bad-trip psychedelia shot through with wistful and whimsical melodies and occasional haunted voices. 
      So, on Last One In for example, what could be a chirpy and exciting theme tune to a 1970s kid’s adventure series is modulated into a minor key by a sinister synth bass line and menaced by a stomping bother boy rhythm. In the opening track On to the Pier & Down to the Sea, the amusement arcade din is submerged in a watery digital swirl during. Likewise, on Tippy Toe Tippy Toe the tiddly-om-pom-pom of the pier is heard from the point of view some approaching aquatic creature or perhaps by a drowning man. This track heralds the closing section of the album which shifts focus from the seafront to its rustic precursor, the mayday fair. Something weird comes to the village in Waiting by the Window. Sounding as if late period Radiophonic Workshop (when they got hold of expensive synths) had popped back 15 years to work with their boffinish tape wielding forbears. It summons an atmosphere like a Nigel Kneale drama or one of those folk-horror inspired episodes of Dr.Who. Finally, the album’s title track seems to offer a chance of escape to a more rustic idyll with melancholy mellotron flute and mumbled nursery rhymes. But as the album closes it feels like a relentlessly inescapable holiday-special steam train drags us back On to the Pier & Down to the Sea. 


       
    • By Rubin Farr
      A wishlist of 90s-00s goth /industrial / hauntology / occult-related bands from the legendary Cleopatra label, with a choice of colored 7" vinyl, now at a sale price. If this was 1995, I'd be tempted to buy it. Limited to 666 copies of each vinyl color.

      https://cleorecs.com/store/shop/occult-box-limited-edition-5-cds-7-lp-w-pendant-chain/
       
       
    • Guest
×
×
  • Create New...