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Rubin Farr

Hauntology

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I think this blog would be of great interest to anyone on this thread: we are the mutantshere's their about page info:

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We Are the Mutants is a weekly updated magazine focusing on the history and analysis of Cold War-era popular and outsider culture, with a strong emphasis on speculative (sci-fi, fantasy, horror), genre, pulp, cult, occult, subculture, and anti-establishment media. We cover everything from underground comics and post-apocalyptic fictions to ufology tropes and space disco.

Although our area of concentration is the late 1960s through the early 1980s, any compelling artifact produced between V-E Day and the fall of the Berlin Wall is fair game. We will also explore contemporary material on occasion, especially works that creatively subvert the status quo.

The title of the magazine is taken from graffiti seen at the University of California at Berkeley in the late 1960s: “The bomb has already dropped, and we are the mutants.”

They take submissions for articles FYI

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Ordered a copy of this 'zine, it's going into 3rd printing, so hope it's worth reading.

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Avebury + Coil + Jarman =

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo7Rmu3woNk

Jarman's vids still unsettle & work really well with all manner of suitably warped Cyclobe/NWW/Andrew Liles tracks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPPsIpkSTx8

https://www.discogs.com/Cyclobe-Sulphur-Tarot-Garden/master/650823

 

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Haunted generation, both now & in the future

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Ghoulish indeed ^

Kind of topic related; when I was in primary school there was a book in the library about ghosts that scared the absolute tits off me at the time and has been haunting my memory (sorry) on and off for years ever since; could never quite remember the name though.

Imagine how buzzed I was to see this the other day:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2019/jun/12/ghosts-shaped-my-life-out-of-print-childrens-classic-to-be-resurrected

I was reading through the article thinking, "it's not the ghost book, it can't be that ghost book," but sure enough, that's the one that caused numerous sleepless nights; the mighty Usborne World of Ghosts. Lovely to read through the comments and see multitudes of other people were just as shat up by it was I was; will definitely be gripping a copy when it comes out.

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Tales of the Unexpected did the same for me, on top of old school Christmas treats like The Signalman (the Denholm Elliot adaptation is mint too). Technically, it was verboten because of sprog-aged naivety & adult themes. However, the chintzy exotica-styled theme tune that wafted up the staircase, the ill-fated destiny of its main protagonists (glimpsed through railings), compounded by finally getting full viewings not long after...they truly don't make them like that any more & that's not nostalgia speaking. A bit like The Twilight Zone, but more surreal because they didn't do sci-fi twists.

The Box of Delights is well worth a rummage & also had a later tv adaptation. Robert Stephens positively oozes malevolence. Trying to get the new sprog crew into it, v mixed results doe.

 

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Stumbled on this looking for a suitably cosmic Alan Moore jpg elsewhere

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Film-maker Andrew Kötting again takes inspiration from that great psycho-geographer Iain Sinclair – with whom he recorded an unclassifiably strange journey by pedalo in the 2012 film Swandown. Now he has been inspired by Sinclair’s book Edge of the Orison, about the fascinating and melancholy 90-mile walk undertaken in 1841 by the nature poet John Clare, from a mental asylum in Epping to Northampton, on a pilgrimage to find Mary Joyce, the woman with whom he believed himself to be in love. 

Kötting has Toby Jones recreate the scenes of Clare’s great journey or ordeal, often amid bizarrely alienating and alienated scenes of modern life. Jones recites some of Clare’s work in voiceover, and Kötting also asks Jones’s father Freddie Jones to recreate his performance as Clare from a 1970 Omnibus documentary, from which he samples the patronising narration assuring us that Clare “was a minor nature poet who went mad”.

 Engagingly, oddly, and rather disturbingly, Kötting himself dresses as a “straw bear” who ambles about the place like some occult folk sacrifice and Sinclair undertakes an interview on the subject of Clare with Alan Moore, who describes Northampton as so drenched with literary and poetic association that it is “a kind of vision-sump”. Kötting’s critical reading of Clare emphasises his transgressive quality but the film allows us to suspect that Clare was quite as sophisticated and self-aware as anyone making this film.

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Well worth a read (except the original county name is Gwent). Archaeology, anthropology, The Green Man, Puck/Pwca origins, Arthur Machen, stone(d) circles, the Mari Lywydd....cheers Dad

 

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Been doing some reading lately about psychogeography and the renewed interest in UK folklore.  Weird Walk was my starting point, and am anticipating his next issue, whenever that drops.

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Just an awesome picture of Trish Keenan I found online:

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Picked these up for an international trip:

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Anyone into the Bibliotapes releases?  I keep having to wait for the digitals to surface, but they're spread across each artists's bandcamp pages:

https://www.bibliotapes.co.uk/

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On 8/22/2019 at 7:36 PM, Rubin Farr said:

Picked these up for an international trip:

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Fortean Times was a teenage obsession, bit like Fangoria, but it had James Randi debunking the slew of bs. Bloke was funny as fuck too, really dry & dismissive.

37 minutes ago, Rubin Farr said:

Given Kwaidan is one of my fave filems, feel a bit wary here, or is that the point mwuahaaaa

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@Rubin Farr posted this earlier, seems fitting

 

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