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Do any of you utilize Spotify as artists?  Pretty new shit to me.  I have mine verified, so I can go in and edit my artist page, but I'm pretty unsure of where else to go from there, haha.  I guess it's all about making playlists and sharing them?

 

Is it even worth it? Seems like you have to have millions of listens to accrue any kind of meaningful income from it anyway.

 

It was actually Jimmy Edgar on facebook that got me thinking about it in the first place with a status,

"I've been telling everyone to focus on streaming for the past few years and I'm just now starting to focus on my own/Ultramajic. Spotify users: are you often seeing new releases from artists you follow? What does your interaction look like? Do you frequent the same playlists?"

 

So any kind of discussion would be great here, also post up your pages if you have one we can follow each other and get connected.

 

Mine: https://open.spotify.com/artist/1PIdv3MR5xZgqcrNgyBA3g

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A friend of mine 'released' some of my music through his mostly-inactive label a while back, and got some of it on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/artist/2BEUBkMgkgnq9caAlc7AIn but as far as he's ever told me I'm sure it's been played nearly zero times. I haven't much considered putting my stuff on there on my own, I assumed it was a big long process. Curious to hear if it's relatively easy to do my own and others' experiences doing so.

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A friend of mine 'released' some of my music through his mostly-inactive label a while back, and got some of it on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/artist/2BEUBkMgkgnq9caAlc7AIn but as far as he's ever told me I'm sure it's been played nearly zero times. I haven't much considered putting my stuff on there on my own, I assumed it was a big long process. Curious to hear if it's relatively easy to do my own and others' experiences doing so.

 Followed!!  Will give some listens soon.

Artists.spotify.com if you want to try to access your account.

 

As far as placing your music, I use Distrokid for all my music.  Easy as hell and relatively cheap.  I paid a bit more as I'm running the label as well.  It puts the music of your choice on Itunes, Google Play, Spotify, really all that shit.

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Thinking about using distrokid, but wonder if uploading previously released creative commons stuff will affect copyright. For example I share most of my music on free music archive that people can use for their projects, would pushing the same music to all the streaming services cause flagging on youtube/vimeo etc? 

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Followed you back too lyst, and started on Spotify's verification process so I can get access to the page so that's cool. 

 

Just looked at Distrokid too, I really doubt I'd even make the $20 back that it costs to get signed up for a year...could be worth it if it led to more people actually just going to Bandcamp to purchase, though. Certainly worth considering at that price point, though. I guess I need to get signed up on BMI or something too, as many years as I've been releasing music I've never done it.

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Thinking about using distrokid, but wonder if uploading previously released creative commons stuff will affect copyright. For example I share most of my music on free music archive that people can use for their projects, would pushing the same music to all the streaming services cause flagging on youtube/vimeo etc? 

 

That is a good question, one I cannot answer.  The most i've uploaded my music on before putting on there was Soundcloud.  Distrokid's costumer service is pretty on point, I would go directly to them and ask them that question personally.

 

 

Followed you back too lyst, and started on Spotify's verification process so I can get access to the page so that's cool. 

 

Just looked at Distrokid too, I really doubt I'd even make the $20 back that it costs to get signed up for a year...could be worth it if it led to more people actually just going to Bandcamp to purchase, though. Certainly worth considering at that price point, though. I guess I need to get signed up on BMI or something too, as many years as I've been releasing music I've never done it.

 

I signed up for BMI a year or two ago because someone wanted to do stuff over one of my works, really BMI did nothing for me.  It didn't affect me negatively nor positively.  I wouldn't really suggest it either way.  Then again the guy told me I was be linked up through BMI with the track, and he never followed through and never paid me, haha.  (Fckin dick)

 

Distrokid is not a bad route though if you are willing to shoot out your links a bit, definitely include all the links on your websites, soundcloud, or bandcamp.  I have not seen anything monetarily really from it yet.  In fact, I feel like the most of what i've made is from me buying my own shit.  But I guess that's partly the reason why I have put it all up as well, you leave quite a larger carbon footprint.  Let's say my laptop AND external all of the sudden die, and Soundcloud finally goes to the shitter.  I know my music is still somewhere even if I have to purchase it.

 

As far as Spotify goes, i'm still a newb, but it does seem like you could possibly make some money from it.  Although, could be a bit time consuming creating playlists and shit ilke that.

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I have a couple albums on Spotify, but they were put on there ages ago by distro services. I feel like I benefit more from not having much on Spotify and having everything available on my Bandcamp page.

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I have a couple albums on Spotify, but they were put on there ages ago by distro services. I feel like I benefit more from not having much on Spotify and having everything available on my Bandcamp page.

 

Difference is Spotify you get paid per stream.  Bandcamp people can stream your music all they like and buy it if they wish to support.

 

I'm kind of going at it as many possible angles that I can.  As many streaming services, downloading services, websites, etc.  Figure the bigger web you send out the more will get caught.

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I have a couple albums on Spotify, but they were put on there ages ago by distro services. I feel like I benefit more from not having much on Spotify and having everything available on my Bandcamp page.

 

Difference is Spotify you get paid per stream.  Bandcamp people can stream your music all they like and buy it if they wish to support.

 

I'm kind of going at it as many possible angles that I can.  As many streaming services, downloading services, websites, etc.  Figure the bigger web you send out the more will get caught.

 

 

 

You get paid per stream, but it's less than a cent per play.

 

You can set how many times people can stream your music on Bandcamp. If you really want to restrict it, like Analogical Force or Love Love Records which only allow 3-4 plays, it helps drive revenue. I would wager you get a higher 'buys per play' on Bandcamp than Spotify.

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I have a couple albums on Spotify, but they were put on there ages ago by distro services. I feel like I benefit more from not having much on Spotify and having everything available on my Bandcamp page.

 

Difference is Spotify you get paid per stream.  Bandcamp people can stream your music all they like and buy it if they wish to support.

 

I'm kind of going at it as many possible angles that I can.  As many streaming services, downloading services, websites, etc.  Figure the bigger web you send out the more will get caught.

 

 

 

You get paid per stream, but it's less than a cent per play.

 

You can set how many times people can stream your music on Bandcamp. If you really want to restrict it, like Analogical Force or Love Love Records which only allow 3-4 plays, it helps drive revenue. I would wager you get a higher 'buys per play' on Bandcamp than Spotify.

 

 

Quite possibly.  But in this thread i am more interested in the benefits to Spotify.  There are no real "discovery" features in Bandcamp, no playlist-- to put it plainly, Spotify is an Internet Radio, which bandcamp most certainly is not.  It is like comparing apples to oranges.

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My music is on Spotify... for convenience I'd say. So that if you look for it, you can find it there too.

 

Streaming revenue is laughable unfortunately, no matter the exposure / quality of the music... even if you're a big cat. I'm not, but I've made a couple of thousands of plays (maybe a tad more, can't remember) the last few months and it can barely pay for a nice diner at the restaurant. I don't have access to my older releases though (which were published by quite a big company... but that's another story), which may have had a bump thanks to my most recent, self-released one.

 

I haven't bothered to edit my artist page, I don't think anyone has checked it yet ^^

Edited by Nil

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I guess my main reason for this is really to help get the music out there.  It's not always about how much money one can make, but expanding the music to more people- getting more fans.  I'm independently releasing all of my music at this point, so it's all on my shoulders if anyone even hears it.

 

Submitting one of my more popular sounding tracks to a few playlists, i'll update here if it goes anywhere.

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Spotify (and other streaming platforms) is where artists and labels (indie and major alike) are trying to make a revenue... and they're spending time and money to be playlisted in the "influential" ones. I'm simply afraid that the quality of the music is often, once again, not correlated with the exposure it gets (or not). Playlists are just different kind of shark pits.

 

I can't help believing that cherishing the fans you already have is way more crucial and beneficial to expand your fanbase in the long run. They already love your music and are the most likely to spread the word.

 

I sincerely wish you all the luck though.

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Spotify (and other streaming platforms) is where artists and labels (indie and major alike) are trying to make a revenue... and they're spending time and money to be playlisted in the "influential" ones. I'm simply afraid that the quality of the music is often, once again, not correlated with the exposure it gets (or not). Playlists are just different kind of shark pits.

 

I can't help believing that cherishing the fans you already have is way more crucial and beneficial to expand your fanbase in the long run. They already love your music and are the most likely to spread the word.

 

I sincerely wish you all the luck though.

 

That is all true, but all pretty obvious.  The Music Scene has been watering down like that for years.  Every stream service its the same BS.  But it does not mean that there is no good music or no good playlists that are there for the right reason.  Which is just to spread good music.

 

You might have a large fan base, if you do that is great for you.  I do not so I am trying every avenue I can to get some ears on my music.  Simply cherishing the fans i have now is not really a possibility.

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Call me Captain Obvious then :) No fanbase is too small: you have more than a thousand of followers on SC, isn't it cool already? I believe the way you're often uploading new tunes is more effective in building something solid. You've said it yourself, you're self-releasing your music and I bet it's already a lot of work to achieve, and from my experience being playlisted on Spotify isn't as crucial as what it might first seem, it might not worth the efforts at the moment. Do you often DJ/play live?

Of course, YMMV / my 2 cents, just trying to provide some more food for thoughts here.

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Call me Captain Obvious then :) No fanbase is too small: you have more than a thousand of followers on SC, isn't it cool already? I believe the way you're often uploading new tunes is more effective in building something solid. You've said it yourself, you're self-releasing your music and I bet it's already a lot of work to achieve, and from my experience being playlisted on Spotify isn't as crucial as what it might first seem, it might not worth the efforts at the moment. Do you often DJ/play live?

Of course, YMMV / my 2 cents, just trying to provide some more food for thoughts here.

 

Good thoughts.

 

First of all what I've found is having followers on Soundcloud means nothing.  I think the only thing it does is make you look a bit more legit than someone that has 50-200 followers.  I don't know anyone that is sitting on Soundcloud and waiting for new stuff to be released by artists they follow, just does not happen.  Maybe it used to function that way, it does not anymore.  People have to be directed to your music on there from a 3rd party.

 

As far as DJ and playing live, I have no interest in it.  Main reason-- My day-job / profession is really demanding.  I barely have enough time and motivation to work on new music, let alone try to start doing live shows and getting sets together and spending nights and clubs and little venues.  I see it as a viable way to make money off of merchandise, CD, etc, but that's not why I'm in this in the first place.  Honestly I'm at the point in my life I'd rather spend that time with my family.

 

As far as Spotify, i'm not saying it's going to blow up anyone's career.  I'm interested in the idea that one's music will be played on random or on playlists, where entirely new people can hear the music and get into it.  Instead of being force-fed the music with Facebook ads or getting spammed, you get yourself on a few spots on some playlists and radios, people are more apt to give it a listen.

 

I have to say it works, too.  A playlister / radio guy at "Indieshuffle" got into some of my stuff, started putting it on playlists.  Got a bit more interest and it was gratifying.  It's someone that genuinely likes your music spreading it.  A little more of a unobtrusive way to get your music in ears I feel as opposed to other options.

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I joined this program only because DistroKid members could join free. I don't expect much more in terms of micro-sales but there's no denying that Spotify is a player and it doesn't hurt to have an artist profile page on their service. And with Soundcloud seemingly in an ever-tenuous existence, probably more reason than ever.

 

Note about DistroKid: I joined when they had a deal going but, unless you make 100k's of sales per year it's not an income, just pocket money. But it does make distributing your music SUPER easy.

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Spotify for Artists is really good. I use it every day, as it's useful for keeping track of how tracks are performing and what playlists you're featured on.

 

Like anything else on Spotify though, it's completely dependent on how much people actually stream your music. I get 105k+ unique listeners a month (which equates to about half a million actual streams/month), so it's a large enough gamut of people to make deep stats useful and reliable. If you have less than 200 listeners a month for example, having detailed breakdowns isn't really something that is going to make much difference to how you promote/manage music, beyond mere curiosity. 

 

Everyone knows Spotify doesn't pay great (I calculated it to about an average of $0.004 per-stream, when you factor in free accounts as well as Premium) so the key with this platform is to get on the big playlists, especially Spotify's own. I'm on 2 big Spotify playlists, which equates to 69% of my total playcount over a month (over 300k streams/month alone just via these). After that, it's the other user playlists and people who find your music organically through your artist page etc... Obviously getting on the big Spotify playlists isn't easy, but they do have loads of them now, covering most genres/moods etc.. If your music is good enough (and you have luck on your side) then you'll get on them eventually. I can't understate how much of a difference they make to your overall listeners (and as a byproduct, royalty statement) each month. Most people using Spotify just want to hear music that fits whatever mood they're feeling, so it's these compilation playlists that get by far the most listeners on the platform.

 

I definitely recommend artists make their own public playlists and include them on your artist page at the top. Stick a few of your own tracks in there, along with other peoples you like/want to support. Spotify is a great tool because of how easy it is to make and share playlists, which propagates more music discoveries among the users. If you're an artist with an existing audience, then I think it's your moral duty to help others too, at least IMO.

 

Also, for the guy above who mentioned Soundcloud and how useless an indicator it is for actual listeners/people buying your music: He's spot on. I've stopped putting any effort into it now and will likely delete my entire account in the near-future. Soundcloud is having real financial difficulties and probably won't even be around for much longer. It's a dying ship and I've noticed MASSIVE hits to streams over the past year in particular. Don't rely on it to promote your music any more, cos it's rubbish IMO.

 

Also Distrokid is brilliant. I used to use CDBaby as my digital broker, but Distrokid lets you add unlimited albums/eps/singles etc.. for an annual payment, rather than $50 or so per-album/ep. They don't take a cut of your royalty statement each month too. If you want your music on Spotify (and all the other digital download services) then they're the best for sure.

Edited by brisk

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Is there any way around Distrokid's stupid fucking capitalization rules? Signed up and was going to start uploading some music and they absolutely will not let me use lower case or any unique cases. I don't even understand why. It may sound stupid but I seriously may cancel with them if it's not something I can't get around.

Edited by auxien

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lol

also, check my page out on spotify and follow me etc:

 

https://open.spotify.com/artist/0uOaZ2bjKDrSVRfZMgjsGu?si=FfOteh1x

 

Followed! Get mine too buddy.  

https://open.spotify.com/artist/1PIdv3MR5xZgqcrNgyBA3g

 

 

 

Spotify for Artists is really good. I use it every day, as it's useful for keeping track of how tracks are performing and what playlists you're featured on.

 

Like anything else on Spotify though, it's completely dependent on how much people actually stream your music. I get 105k+ unique listeners a month (which equates to about half a million actual streams/month), so it's a large enough gamut of people to make deep stats useful and reliable. If you have less than 200 listeners a month for example, having detailed breakdowns isn't really something that is going to make much difference to how you promote/manage music, beyond mere curiosity. 

 

Everyone knows Spotify doesn't pay great (I calculated it to about an average of $0.004 per-stream, when you factor in free accounts as well as Premium) so the key with this platform is to get on the big playlists, especially Spotify's own. I'm on 2 big Spotify playlists, which equates to 69% of my total playcount over a month (over 300k streams/month alone just via these). After that, it's the other user playlists and people who find your music organically through your artist page etc... Obviously getting on the big Spotify playlists isn't easy, but they do have loads of them now, covering most genres/moods etc.. If your music is good enough (and you have luck on your side) then you'll get on them eventually. I can't understate how much of a difference they make to your overall listeners (and as a byproduct, royalty statement) each month. Most people using Spotify just want to hear music that fits whatever mood they're feeling, so it's these compilation playlists that get by far the most listeners on the platform.

 

I definitely recommend artists make their own public playlists and include them on your artist page at the top. Stick a few of your own tracks in there, along with other peoples you like/want to support. Spotify is a great tool because of how easy it is to make and share playlists, which propagates more music discoveries among the users. If you're an artist with an existing audience, then I think it's your moral duty to help others too, at least IMO.

 

Also, for the guy above who mentioned Soundcloud and how useless an indicator it is for actual listeners/people buying your music: He's spot on. I've stopped putting any effort into it now and will likely delete my entire account in the near-future. Soundcloud is having real financial difficulties and probably won't even be around for much longer. It's a dying ship and I've noticed MASSIVE hits to streams over the past year in particular. Don't rely on it to promote your music any more, cos it's rubbish IMO.

 

Also Distrokid is brilliant. I used to use CDBaby as my digital broker, but Distrokid lets you add unlimited albums/eps/singles etc.. for an annual payment, rather than $50 or so per-album/ep. They don't take a cut of your royalty statement each month too. If you want your music on Spotify (and all the other digital download services) then they're the best for sure.

 

All sounds pretty great, and a reason why I started this thread-- to spread some knowledge that people like you seem to have.

 

Question, I can only seem to create playlists in my personal account- While it is public, i am unable to find the playlist on my artist profile, it will not show up when I put it in the search bar.  How do you create your own playlist as an artist-- and does it appear when you search it on your artist page?? I'm wondering if I am lacking some ability to do things because my following is very small at this point.

 

This is where I'm talking--

En6LeRt.jpg

 

I'm guessing because my playlists have almost ZERO followers, I am unable to search them up.

 

Is there any way around Distrokid's stupid fucking capitalization rules? Signed up and was going to start uploading some music and they absolutely will not let me use lower case or any unique cases. I don't even understand why. It may sound stupid but I seriously may cancel with them if it's not something I can't get around.

 

No idea man, sorry.

 

I joined this program only because DistroKid members could join free. I don't expect much more in terms of micro-sales but there's no denying that Spotify is a player and it doesn't hurt to have an artist profile page on their service. And with Soundcloud seemingly in an ever-tenuous existence, probably more reason than ever.

 

Note about DistroKid: I joined when they had a deal going but, unless you make 100k's of sales per year it's not an income, just pocket money. But it does make distributing your music SUPER easy.

 

Agree completely.  Way bigger carbon footprint of your music all over the place.

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Spotify for Artists is really good. I use it every day, as it's useful for keeping track of how tracks are performing and what playlists you're featured on.

 

Like anything else on Spotify though, it's completely dependent on how much people actually stream your music. I get 105k+ unique listeners a month (which equates to about half a million actual streams/month), so it's a large enough gamut of people to make deep stats useful and reliable. If you have less than 200 listeners a month for example, having detailed breakdowns isn't really something that is going to make much difference to how you promote/manage music, beyond mere curiosity. 

 

Everyone knows Spotify doesn't pay great (I calculated it to about an average of $0.004 per-stream, when you factor in free accounts as well as Premium) so the key with this platform is to get on the big playlists, especially Spotify's own. I'm on 2 big Spotify playlists, which equates to 69% of my total playcount over a month (over 300k streams/month alone just via these). After that, it's the other user playlists and people who find your music organically through your artist page etc... Obviously getting on the big Spotify playlists isn't easy, but they do have loads of them now, covering most genres/moods etc.. If your music is good enough (and you have luck on your side) then you'll get on them eventually. I can't understate how much of a difference they make to your overall listeners (and as a byproduct, royalty statement) each month. Most people using Spotify just want to hear music that fits whatever mood they're feeling, so it's these compilation playlists that get by far the most listeners on the platform.

 

I definitely recommend artists make their own public playlists and include them on your artist page at the top. Stick a few of your own tracks in there, along with other peoples you like/want to support. Spotify is a great tool because of how easy it is to make and share playlists, which propagates more music discoveries among the users. If you're an artist with an existing audience, then I think it's your moral duty to help others too, at least IMO.

 

Also, for the guy above who mentioned Soundcloud and how useless an indicator it is for actual listeners/people buying your music: He's spot on. I've stopped putting any effort into it now and will likely delete my entire account in the near-future. Soundcloud is having real financial difficulties and probably won't even be around for much longer. It's a dying ship and I've noticed MASSIVE hits to streams over the past year in particular. Don't rely on it to promote your music any more, cos it's rubbish IMO.

 

Also Distrokid is brilliant. I used to use CDBaby as my digital broker, but Distrokid lets you add unlimited albums/eps/singles etc.. for an annual payment, rather than $50 or so per-album/ep. They don't take a cut of your royalty statement each month too. If you want your music on Spotify (and all the other digital download services) then they're the best for sure.

 

All sounds pretty great, and a reason why I started this thread-- to spread some knowledge that people like you seem to have.

 

Question, I can only seem to create playlists in my personal account- While it is public, i am unable to find the playlist on my artist profile, it will not show up when I put it in the search bar.  How do you create your own playlist as an artist-- and does it appear when you search it on your artist page?? I'm wondering if I am lacking some ability to do things because my following is very small at this point.

 

This is where I'm talking--

En6LeRt.jpg

 

I'm guessing because my playlists have almost ZERO followers, I am unable to search them up.

 

 

 

It's a little finicky in my experience. You have to type out the name of your playlist and wait for the auto-fill thing to kick in, adding more text until it finds yours. You could make this easier by naming your playlist something unique, so it's easier to find.

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Spotify for Artists is really good. I use it every day, as it's useful for keeping track of how tracks are performing and what playlists you're featured on.

 

Like anything else on Spotify though, it's completely dependent on how much people actually stream your music. I get 105k+ unique listeners a month (which equates to about half a million actual streams/month), so it's a large enough gamut of people to make deep stats useful and reliable. If you have less than 200 listeners a month for example, having detailed breakdowns isn't really something that is going to make much difference to how you promote/manage music, beyond mere curiosity. 

 

Everyone knows Spotify doesn't pay great (I calculated it to about an average of $0.004 per-stream, when you factor in free accounts as well as Premium) so the key with this platform is to get on the big playlists, especially Spotify's own. I'm on 2 big Spotify playlists, which equates to 69% of my total playcount over a month (over 300k streams/month alone just via these). After that, it's the other user playlists and people who find your music organically through your artist page etc... Obviously getting on the big Spotify playlists isn't easy, but they do have loads of them now, covering most genres/moods etc.. If your music is good enough (and you have luck on your side) then you'll get on them eventually. I can't understate how much of a difference they make to your overall listeners (and as a byproduct, royalty statement) each month. Most people using Spotify just want to hear music that fits whatever mood they're feeling, so it's these compilation playlists that get by far the most listeners on the platform.

 

I definitely recommend artists make their own public playlists and include them on your artist page at the top. Stick a few of your own tracks in there, along with other peoples you like/want to support. Spotify is a great tool because of how easy it is to make and share playlists, which propagates more music discoveries among the users. If you're an artist with an existing audience, then I think it's your moral duty to help others too, at least IMO.

 

Also, for the guy above who mentioned Soundcloud and how useless an indicator it is for actual listeners/people buying your music: He's spot on. I've stopped putting any effort into it now and will likely delete my entire account in the near-future. Soundcloud is having real financial difficulties and probably won't even be around for much longer. It's a dying ship and I've noticed MASSIVE hits to streams over the past year in particular. Don't rely on it to promote your music any more, cos it's rubbish IMO.

 

Also Distrokid is brilliant. I used to use CDBaby as my digital broker, but Distrokid lets you add unlimited albums/eps/singles etc.. for an annual payment, rather than $50 or so per-album/ep. They don't take a cut of your royalty statement each month too. If you want your music on Spotify (and all the other digital download services) then they're the best for sure.

 

All sounds pretty great, and a reason why I started this thread-- to spread some knowledge that people like you seem to have.

 

Question, I can only seem to create playlists in my personal account- While it is public, i am unable to find the playlist on my artist profile, it will not show up when I put it in the search bar.  How do you create your own playlist as an artist-- and does it appear when you search it on your artist page?? I'm wondering if I am lacking some ability to do things because my following is very small at this point.

 

This is where I'm talking--

En6LeRt.jpg

 

I'm guessing because my playlists have almost ZERO followers, I am unable to search them up.

 

 

 

It's a little finicky in my experience. You have to type out the name of your playlist and wait for the auto-fill thing to kick in, adding more text until it finds yours. You could make this easier by naming your playlist something unique, so it's easier to find.

 

 

Yea see this will not matter.  The playlist is literally unsearchable if you do not have followers or if your playlist does not have followers.  They make it so that little guys have no chance.  Literally type the exact name of my playlist and it says "no playlist found".  Thanks a lot dickhead spotify.

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BUMP.

 

So I talked to some other artists and people, (some higher up there in the foodchain as well), and what the consensus was was that everything seems to be going towards Spotify and internet radios.  For a very long time I was promoting my Soundcloud, Itunes, Google Play, etc-- What I've noticed is they are no longer giving any return.  The more and more advancements in music, the more people are getting lazy and just throwing on Spotify.  Not to say this is very different from Radio of the past, but there was at one time something special about purchasing music.  Now we have little laptops that are phones that can stream and music you want to hear within seconds. 

 

I will buy some Vinyl or CDs every once in a while, but it is more infrequent than ever.  Actually I use Spotify a lot now for my own listening experience.  It is great if you do not want to have to spend the time picking what song is next, or some kind of order, or whatever.

 

So i've been putting more effort into my artist account.  And it is showing results.  It will be a slow build, which I am fine with, but it seems far more active than another means of your music getting played.  

 

Anyone else here messing around with this?  Any new tips or tricks?

 

Also-- my newest track  :wink:

https://open.spotify.com/track/0i1AFNRRNCIMZuI7a3DZUC

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^ Yeah I've heard this same conclusion from some producers - 36 via his facebook and a similar ethos by word of mouth by Mattewdavid of Leaving Records. They are still doing physical but accepting the fact that streaming is here to stay and dominate and re-orienting their distro to take advantage of that.

 

On the flipside I've seen some ambient / drone producers pretty much ignore Spotify and stick with non-streaming digital and physical merch. DJ Healer literally has stuck to vinyl only and I imagine many other techno, house, etc. producers are doing the same. 

 

I suppose it really depends on your fan base and your music: for some Spotify is a nil advantage over their 

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