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Pirtek
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Posted (edited)

re: Blue album, I think my favourite moment on that album is the last minute of Pants with those really "icy" sounding pads, especially towards the very end where it detunes a bit.

Also shout out to One Perfect Sunrise 🧀

Edited by toaoaoad
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Oh Christ, I hate One Perfect Sunrise. Always sounded like self-parody to me, "we need to end our career on something like Halcyon or Are We Here". Coupled with the fact that Lisa Gerrard has such a wonderful, diverse range and yet after Gladiator the only thing anyone ever wanted her to do was that voice, and some pretty questionable Eurotrance style synth choices... ugh, no, horrible track.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, purlieu said:

Oh Christ, I hate One Perfect Sunrise. Always sounded like self-parody to me, "we need to end our career on something like Halcyon or Are We Here". Coupled with the fact that Lisa Gerrard has such a wonderful, diverse range and yet after Gladiator the only thing anyone ever wanted her to do was that voice, and some pretty questionable Eurotrance style synth choices... ugh, no, horrible track.

I pretty much agree with what you're saying, except at the time I appreciated the self-referential, "Orbital does Orbital" aspect of it. They'd been trying a lot of experimental stuff and most of it flopped (imo). The album takes a SHARP nose-dive after You Lot and this track saves the day. It is definitely cheesy, but sometimes cheese is good. I admit I probably wouldn't like it if I were hearing it today for the first time, but back then it hit the right spot.

Edited by toaoaoad
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13 hours ago, toaoaoad said:

The album takes a SHARP nose-dive after You Lot and this track saves the day.

Yeah, I get what you're saying. I love 'Transient', the four after it are all decent and would probably be fine on earlier albums with slightly better production, but tracks 6-8 are a career low point. 'Acid Pants' is one of the most annoying pieces of music I've ever heard.

The radio version of 'One Perfect Sunrise' is an edit of Phil's remix, isn't it? Haven't heard that in ages, must check it out again.

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15 hours ago, toaoaoad said:

They'd been trying a lot of experimental stuff and most of it flopped (imo). 

Agreed (imo) e.g. 

Orbital attempts brostep

Orbital attempts UK Grime

Orbital attempts ... erm David Grey

 

(......though to be fair time has softened my hatred to them over the years!)

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2 hours ago, purlieu said:

Yeah, I get what you're saying. I love 'Transient', the four after it are all decent and would probably be fine on earlier albums with slightly better production, but tracks 6-8 are a career low point. 'Acid Pants' is one of the most annoying pieces of music I've ever heard.

The radio version of 'One Perfect Sunrise' is an edit of Phil's remix, isn't it? Haven't heard that in ages, must check it out again.

Orbital themselves have said some of The Altogether and Blue put together makes one good album.

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40 minutes ago, Pirtek said:

Orbital themselves have said some of The Altogether and Blue put together makes one good album.

I would say the cream of the Altogether tracks including some of the material from that bonus disc and one-offs, would make an LP that would stand up with any of their earlier releases.

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1 hour ago, Extralife said:

I would say the cream of the Altogether tracks including some of the material from that bonus disc and one-offs, would make an LP that would stand up with any of their earlier releases.

Agree. Monorail for example.

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1. Tension
2. Funny Break (One is Enough)
3. Tunnel Vision
4. Oi!
5. Pay Per View
6. Lost
7. Tootled
8. You Lot
9. Shadows
10. Monorail
11. Transient

Yeah, that would work pretty well. On the whole I actually quite like The Altogether. It took a long time to click but I'm fond of it now. I wrote this about it on Discogs:

Orbital cut ties with their club roots - temporarily at least.

The Altogether got a lot of flak when it came out, from myself included. The chunky drum sounds, the long unfurling epics interspersed with occasional club bangers: all gone. Orbital's pop album: something, it seemed, that nobody really wanted. Strong lead single - and the most classic-Orbital sounding track here - 'Funny Break', gave listeners false expectations. So the disappointment on initial plays led to an understandably negative response.

In hindsight, I find it a lot easier to be positive about the album for what it is: a very brave record. Previous album The Middle of Nowhere was solid, but found them out of new ideas - Orbital by numbers. Instead of continuing down that path with diminishing returns, they decided to mix things up entirely. The snippets of pop songs and '70s sci-fi that littered their tracks in the past now take the fore. Parts of the record - most notably 'Shadows' - preempt the hauntology movement, with a strong influence from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. 'Waving Not Drowning', ties together folky acoustics and basic analogue electronics in a disturbingly cheery kids TV theme. 'Pay Per View' skews lounge music into strange territories; 'Tootled' does the same with metal, sampling heavily from Tool. 'Tension' and 'Oi!' have tongues firmly fitted in cheeks, retro sounds and chirpy melodies mashing together rockabilly and rave.

It's not all great. 'Last Thing' is b-side quality, 'Doctor?' is a novelty step too far - a fun live track that should have been kept to the stage - and the less said about David Gray's appearance on 'Illuminate' the better. 'Meltdown' is decent but totally unfitting for the album. The album's artwork is really quite bad, even by the retro tongue-in-cheek feel of the album (bring back the old logo and swirly emblem!)

The Altogether is never going to be reassessed as a masterpiece, but I think it's time it gets a wider reappraisal. It's a bold record, a band trying a totally different approach after taking their classic sound as far as possible. It's intentionally retro sounding, and intentionally poppy, so those kitsch, cheesy sounds people often complain about are being unfairly misjudged. It might not be the most successful experiment ever, but it's an admirable one, and one that yields some excellent results in hindsight.

The US version features a generous, if slightly muddled, bonus disc, featuring all the original non-album material from the 'Style', 'Nothing Left', 'Beached' (sadly not 'Beached' itself, with the rights being owned by 20th Century Fox) and 'Funny Break' singles, plus the Altogether DVD bonus track 'Monorail'. Although these are almost all ostensibly the band's remixes of their own material, Orbital come from the same school of artists as FSOL and Underworld when it comes to reworking their own tracks into wonderful new, often unrecognisible, tracks. The menacing electro-breaks of 'Beelzebeat', for instance, started life as 'Funny Break', although one would never know by listening. 'An Fhomhair' is an acidic (and far superior) take on TMON's 'Otono'. 'Weekend Ravers' turns 'Funny Break' into a storming progressive trance number. 'Old Style' begins by reprising the melody from 'Style', before moving into an entirely new piece with an early rave feel. The sole wholly original piece here, 'Mock Tudor' is possibly the best, a stunningly beautiful piece of analogue techno in 7/4.

In terms of consistency and track quality, this bonus disc is one of the finest discs in the band's extensive catalogue. Unfortunately, the production styles of The Middle of Nowhere and The Altogether are incredibly at odds, giving the mixed running order a somewhat clumsy feel. 'Beelzebeat' seems immediately garish when followed by the chunky analogue sound of 'Nothing Left Out'; 'Monorail' suffers similarly sat between two more TMON-era pieces. A purely chronological running order, putting the various 'Style' mixes next to each other would have made an equally unsatisfying listen, but I still think the running order could do with more work to make the disc sound more cohesive.

Regardless, despite the criticisms I do have of this two CD set, they are mostly minor in comparison to the numerous highlights found here. To any newcomers to Orbital potentially put off by the negative response The Altogether has received, I'd strongly recommend giving this 2CD set a listen, as there is a lot to love if approached from the right perspective.

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Posted (edited)
55 minutes ago, purlieu said:

The Altogether got a lot of flak when it came out, from myself included. The chunky drum sounds, the long unfurling epics interspersed with occasional club bangers: all gone. Orbital's pop album: something, it seemed, that nobody really wanted. Strong lead single - and the most classic-Orbital sounding track here - 'Funny Break', gave listeners false expectations. So the disappointment on initial plays led to an understandably negative response.

In hindsight, I find it a lot easier to be positive about the album for what it is: a very brave record. Previous album The Middle of Nowhere was solid, but found them out of new ideas - Orbital by numbers. Instead of continuing down that path with diminishing returns, they decided to mix things up entirely. The snippets of pop songs and '70s sci-fi that littered their tracks in the past now take the fore. Parts of the record - most notably 'Shadows' - preempt the hauntology movement, with a strong influence from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. 'Waving Not Drowning', ties together folky acoustics and basic analogue electronics in a disturbingly cheery kids TV theme. 'Pay Per View' skews lounge music into strange territories; 'Tootled' does the same with metal, sampling heavily from Tool. 'Tension' and 'Oi!' have tongues firmly fitted in cheeks, retro sounds and chirpy melodies mashing together rockabilly and rave.

It's not all great. 'Last Thing' is b-side quality, 'Doctor?' is a novelty step too far - a fun live track that should have been kept to the stage - and the less said about David Gray's appearance on 'Illuminate' the better. 'Meltdown' is decent but totally unfitting for the album. The album's artwork is really quite bad, even by the retro tongue-in-cheek feel of the album (bring back the old logo and swirly emblem!)

The Altogether is never going to be reassessed as a masterpiece, but I think it's time it gets a wider reappraisal. It's a bold record, a band trying a totally different approach after taking their classic sound as far as possible. It's intentionally retro sounding, and intentionally poppy, so those kitsch, cheesy sounds people often complain about are being unfairly misjudged. It might not be the most successful experiment ever, but it's an admirable one, and one that yields some excellent results in hindsight.

The US version features a generous, if slightly muddled, bonus disc, featuring all the original non-album material from the 'Style', 'Nothing Left', 'Beached' (sadly not 'Beached' itself, with the rights being owned by 20th Century Fox) and 'Funny Break' singles, plus the Altogether DVD bonus track 'Monorail'. Although these are almost all ostensibly the band's remixes of their own material, Orbital come from the same school of artists as FSOL and Underworld when it comes to reworking their own tracks into wonderful new, often unrecognisible, tracks. The menacing electro-breaks of 'Beelzebeat', for instance, started life as 'Funny Break', although one would never know by listening. 'An Fhomhair' is an acidic (and far superior) take on TMON's 'Otono'. 'Weekend Ravers' turns 'Funny Break' into a storming progressive trance number. 'Old Style' begins by reprising the melody from 'Style', before moving into an entirely new piece with an early rave feel. The sole wholly original piece here, 'Mock Tudor' is possibly the best, a stunningly beautiful piece of analogue techno in 7/4.

In terms of consistency and track quality, this bonus disc is one of the finest discs in the band's extensive catalogue. Unfortunately, the production styles of The Middle of Nowhere and The Altogether are incredibly at odds, giving the mixed running order a somewhat clumsy feel. 'Beelzebeat' seems immediately garish when followed by the chunky analogue sound of 'Nothing Left Out'; 'Monorail' suffers similarly sat between two more TMON-era pieces. A purely chronological running order, putting the various 'Style' mixes next to each other would have made an equally unsatisfying listen, but I still think the running order could do with more work to make the disc sound more cohesive.

Regardless, despite the criticisms I do have of this two CD set, they are mostly minor in comparison to the numerous highlights found here. To any newcomers to Orbital potentially put off by the negative response The Altogether has received, I'd strongly recommend giving this 2CD set a listen, as there is a lot to love if approached from the right perspective.

Well said. When I read stuff like this it makes me want to give the album another chance. So then I do, and... nope, still hate it lol

I caned that bonus disc at the time tho.

Edited by toaoaoad
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4 hours ago, purlieu said:

1. Tension
2. Funny Break (One is Enough)
3. Tunnel Vision
4. Oi!
5. Pay Per View
6. Lost
7. Tootled
8. You Lot
9. Shadows
10. Monorail
11. Transient

Yeah, that would work pretty well. On the whole I actually quite like The Altogether. It took a long time to click but I'm fond of it now. I wrote this about it on Discogs:

Orbital cut ties with their club roots - temporarily at least.

The Altogether got a lot of flak when it came out, from myself included. The chunky drum sounds, the long unfurling epics interspersed with occasional club bangers: all gone. Orbital's pop album: something, it seemed, that nobody really wanted. Strong lead single - and the most classic-Orbital sounding track here - 'Funny Break', gave listeners false expectations. So the disappointment on initial plays led to an understandably negative response.

In hindsight, I find it a lot easier to be positive about the album for what it is: a very brave record. Previous album The Middle of Nowhere was solid, but found them out of new ideas - Orbital by numbers. Instead of continuing down that path with diminishing returns, they decided to mix things up entirely. The snippets of pop songs and '70s sci-fi that littered their tracks in the past now take the fore. Parts of the record - most notably 'Shadows' - preempt the hauntology movement, with a strong influence from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. 'Waving Not Drowning', ties together folky acoustics and basic analogue electronics in a disturbingly cheery kids TV theme. 'Pay Per View' skews lounge music into strange territories; 'Tootled' does the same with metal, sampling heavily from Tool. 'Tension' and 'Oi!' have tongues firmly fitted in cheeks, retro sounds and chirpy melodies mashing together rockabilly and rave.

It's not all great. 'Last Thing' is b-side quality, 'Doctor?' is a novelty step too far - a fun live track that should have been kept to the stage - and the less said about David Gray's appearance on 'Illuminate' the better. 'Meltdown' is decent but totally unfitting for the album. The album's artwork is really quite bad, even by the retro tongue-in-cheek feel of the album (bring back the old logo and swirly emblem!)

The Altogether is never going to be reassessed as a masterpiece, but I think it's time it gets a wider reappraisal. It's a bold record, a band trying a totally different approach after taking their classic sound as far as possible. It's intentionally retro sounding, and intentionally poppy, so those kitsch, cheesy sounds people often complain about are being unfairly misjudged. It might not be the most successful experiment ever, but it's an admirable one, and one that yields some excellent results in hindsight.

The US version features a generous, if slightly muddled, bonus disc, featuring all the original non-album material from the 'Style', 'Nothing Left', 'Beached' (sadly not 'Beached' itself, with the rights being owned by 20th Century Fox) and 'Funny Break' singles, plus the Altogether DVD bonus track 'Monorail'. Although these are almost all ostensibly the band's remixes of their own material, Orbital come from the same school of artists as FSOL and Underworld when it comes to reworking their own tracks into wonderful new, often unrecognisible, tracks. The menacing electro-breaks of 'Beelzebeat', for instance, started life as 'Funny Break', although one would never know by listening. 'An Fhomhair' is an acidic (and far superior) take on TMON's 'Otono'. 'Weekend Ravers' turns 'Funny Break' into a storming progressive trance number. 'Old Style' begins by reprising the melody from 'Style', before moving into an entirely new piece with an early rave feel. The sole wholly original piece here, 'Mock Tudor' is possibly the best, a stunningly beautiful piece of analogue techno in 7/4.

In terms of consistency and track quality, this bonus disc is one of the finest discs in the band's extensive catalogue. Unfortunately, the production styles of The Middle of Nowhere and The Altogether are incredibly at odds, giving the mixed running order a somewhat clumsy feel. 'Beelzebeat' seems immediately garish when followed by the chunky analogue sound of 'Nothing Left Out'; 'Monorail' suffers similarly sat between two more TMON-era pieces. A purely chronological running order, putting the various 'Style' mixes next to each other would have made an equally unsatisfying listen, but I still think the running order could do with more work to make the disc sound more cohesive.

Regardless, despite the criticisms I do have of this two CD set, they are mostly minor in comparison to the numerous highlights found here. To any newcomers to Orbital potentially put off by the negative response The Altogether has received, I'd strongly recommend giving this 2CD set a listen, as there is a lot to love if approached from the right perspective.

Really well written review that encompasses everything I feel about this album. I’d add Beezlebeat to that tracklist of yours though.

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8 hours ago, purlieu said:

I would have included Beelzebeat, but... well, it's technically a remix of Funny Break, so I left it off.

Yeah, that's true!

What do you think of the 24 minutes version of Meltdown?

The Middle of Nowhere was the last of the great Orbital albums imo

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I have to say that Orbital doesn't really hold up unfortunately. Most vintage 90s electronic/idm stuff still sounds pretty great to me, but I just can't listen to Orbital anymore. It's all flat, puny and cheesy to my ears now, I fucking hate it. Sorry. :cattears:

Edit: for the record, I did like their stuff back when it was first released.

Edited by Silent Member
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On 5/12/2022 at 6:53 PM, purlieu said:

1. Tension
2. Funny Break (One is Enough)
3. Tunnel Vision
4. Oi!
5. Pay Per View
6. Lost
7. Tootled
8. You Lot
9. Shadows
10. Monorail
11. Transient

Yeah, that would work pretty well. On the whole I actually quite like The Altogether. It took a long time to click but I'm fond of it now. I wrote this about it on Discogs:

Orbital cut ties with their club roots - temporarily at least.

The Altogether got a lot of flak when it came out, from myself included. The chunky drum sounds, the long unfurling epics interspersed with occasional club bangers: all gone. Orbital's pop album: something, it seemed, that nobody really wanted. Strong lead single - and the most classic-Orbital sounding track here - 'Funny Break', gave listeners false expectations. So the disappointment on initial plays led to an understandably negative response.

In hindsight, I find it a lot easier to be positive about the album for what it is: a very brave record. Previous album The Middle of Nowhere was solid, but found them out of new ideas - Orbital by numbers. Instead of continuing down that path with diminishing returns, they decided to mix things up entirely. The snippets of pop songs and '70s sci-fi that littered their tracks in the past now take the fore. Parts of the record - most notably 'Shadows' - preempt the hauntology movement, with a strong influence from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. 'Waving Not Drowning', ties together folky acoustics and basic analogue electronics in a disturbingly cheery kids TV theme. 'Pay Per View' skews lounge music into strange territories; 'Tootled' does the same with metal, sampling heavily from Tool. 'Tension' and 'Oi!' have tongues firmly fitted in cheeks, retro sounds and chirpy melodies mashing together rockabilly and rave.

It's not all great. 'Last Thing' is b-side quality, 'Doctor?' is a novelty step too far - a fun live track that should have been kept to the stage - and the less said about David Gray's appearance on 'Illuminate' the better. 'Meltdown' is decent but totally unfitting for the album. The album's artwork is really quite bad, even by the retro tongue-in-cheek feel of the album (bring back the old logo and swirly emblem!)

The Altogether is never going to be reassessed as a masterpiece, but I think it's time it gets a wider reappraisal. It's a bold record, a band trying a totally different approach after taking their classic sound as far as possible. It's intentionally retro sounding, and intentionally poppy, so those kitsch, cheesy sounds people often complain about are being unfairly misjudged. It might not be the most successful experiment ever, but it's an admirable one, and one that yields some excellent results in hindsight.

The US version features a generous, if slightly muddled, bonus disc, featuring all the original non-album material from the 'Style', 'Nothing Left', 'Beached' (sadly not 'Beached' itself, with the rights being owned by 20th Century Fox) and 'Funny Break' singles, plus the Altogether DVD bonus track 'Monorail'. Although these are almost all ostensibly the band's remixes of their own material, Orbital come from the same school of artists as FSOL and Underworld when it comes to reworking their own tracks into wonderful new, often unrecognisible, tracks. The menacing electro-breaks of 'Beelzebeat', for instance, started life as 'Funny Break', although one would never know by listening. 'An Fhomhair' is an acidic (and far superior) take on TMON's 'Otono'. 'Weekend Ravers' turns 'Funny Break' into a storming progressive trance number. 'Old Style' begins by reprising the melody from 'Style', before moving into an entirely new piece with an early rave feel. The sole wholly original piece here, 'Mock Tudor' is possibly the best, a stunningly beautiful piece of analogue techno in 7/4.

In terms of consistency and track quality, this bonus disc is one of the finest discs in the band's extensive catalogue. Unfortunately, the production styles of The Middle of Nowhere and The Altogether are incredibly at odds, giving the mixed running order a somewhat clumsy feel. 'Beelzebeat' seems immediately garish when followed by the chunky analogue sound of 'Nothing Left Out'; 'Monorail' suffers similarly sat between two more TMON-era pieces. A purely chronological running order, putting the various 'Style' mixes next to each other would have made an equally unsatisfying listen, but I still think the running order could do with more work to make the disc sound more cohesive.

Regardless, despite the criticisms I do have of this two CD set, they are mostly minor in comparison to the numerous highlights found here. To any newcomers to Orbital potentially put off by the negative response The Altogether has received, I'd strongly recommend giving this 2CD set a listen, as there is a lot to love if approached from the right perspective.

This is a great write up, thanks for sharing.

The Middle of Nowhere was the last Orbital album I really enjoyed from start to finish, the last of the great ones.  Downhill from there, sadly.  Every album since has had highlights, but each just hasn't seemed to hold together as a whole.

Edited by NewSchoolScience
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3 hours ago, Silent Member said:

I have to say that Orbital doesn't really hold up unfortunately. Most vintage 90s electronic/idm stuff still sounds pretty great to me, but I just can't listen to Orbital anymore. It's all flat, puny and cheesy to my ears now, I fucking hate it. Sorry. :cattears:

Cmon, the Brown album is a timeless classic.  The three track run of 'Lush 3-1', 'Lush 3-2', into 'Impact (The Earth Is Burning)' is outstanding.  It still hits as hard as it did back in the day.

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1 hour ago, NewSchoolScience said:

Cmon, the Brown album is a timeless classic.  The three track run of 'Lush 3-1', 'Lush 3-2', into 'Impact (The Earth Is Burning)' is outstanding.  It still hits as hard as it did back in the day.

Agreed - mostly. Timeless but a bit bloated. Never been a fan of Monday, but I guess it’s the palate cleanser before the lushness of Halcyon.

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5 hours ago, Pirtek said:

What do you think of the 24 minutes version of Meltdown?

I'm not the biggest fan of 'Meltdown' in general, so the album version is enough for me. It's got some cool bits, but the drums always seem strangely stilted. Can't help feel a breaksy track needs a little more groove to it. It's also really, really out of place on a largely electro-influenced album. Lots of Roland drum machines, old analogue, cheeky retro samples, it just sounds bizarre in that context. Although speaking of the 24 minute version, I really should get my Altogether DVD out again, it's been a while since I went through it. I remember having so much fun exploring all the menus and angles back in the day, must have spent hours on it. It's such a shame really cleverly designed, super-interactive DVDs like that were such a short lived thing.

Kind of agree that there haven't been any 100% classic Orbital records this century. Blue is the only one I don't really rate, but the other three manage to have a couple of really subpar tracks, and the last two have had that horrible EDM drum production that makes them sound so lifeless in comparison with the classic stuff. They're still capable of making absolute bangers though - 'New France', 'One Big Moment', 'PHUK', 'Tiny Foldable Cities', 'Stringy Acid', all up there.

Edited by purlieu
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5 hours ago, NewSchoolScience said:

Cmon, the Brown album is a timeless classic.  The three track run of 'Lush 3-1', 'Lush 3-2', into 'Impact (The Earth Is Burning)' is outstanding.  It still hits as hard as it did back in the day.

 Brown Album hits all the way through. Basically from the Brown Album through to Middle of Nowhere the brothers Hartnoll were producing top notch techno. The Diversions EP in 92 as well was fucking great. 

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5 hours ago, chenGOD said:

 Brown Album hits all the way through. Basically from the Brown Album through to Middle of Nowhere the brothers Hartnoll were producing top notch techno. The Diversions EP in 92 as well was fucking great. 

Totally agree with all the above!!

9 hours ago, purlieu said:

They're still capable of making absolute bangers though - 'New France', 'One Big Moment', 'PHUK', 'Tiny Foldable Cities', 'Stringy Acid', all up there.

Yes, all great tracks.

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9 hours ago, purlieu said:
14 hours ago, Pirtek said:

What do you think of the 24 minutes version of Meltdown?

I'm not the biggest fan of 'Meltdown' in general, so the album version is enough for me.

Yes, I think you're right thinking about it. The album version is probably the best version. Gets a bit too much after a while. The long version does drag on a bit. Out There Somewhere? Now that's a great epic track!

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...guess its finally time for me to check out these guys

 

Where should I start? I was thinking In Sides since a lot of people I trust absolutely adore that one but im curious to hear your picks (if you just say "start from the beginning" id also understand lol)

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On 5/12/2022 at 6:53 PM, purlieu said:

less said about David Gray's appearance on 'Illuminate' the better.

I do like the 12" Orbital remix of it though. I've replaced the album version with this.

24 minutes ago, X4creek said:

Where should I start? I was thinking In Sides

That, The Brown album and Snivilisation

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