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where do you discover your music?

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obviously, watmm is the place for some good music, but what about other places?

i just found hardwax.com a good place to click around and preview stuff.

discogs.com is always _really_ good with suggestions (if you know what you are looking for)

soundcloud.com is nice and all, but it's too noisy. (and it feels more and more like a sort of bubble, i don't know). but it has all the nice, unreleased and weird stuff. and mixes.

 

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Sc

Slsk

Back in the day there was allmusic.com

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I typed 'musique concrete' into the Bandcamp search engine, and next to the results, there was a link that said, 'you might want to check out music tagged with 'musique concrete.' Found some cool stuff there. I check Bleep and Reddit sometimes. I really like Hip Hop instrumentals and found out about FloFilz that way. He's got that nonpareil Hip Hop pocket. I actually get good results every now and then when spotify plays something automatically based on whatever I put on initially. Found a really tight Bootsy Colllins song that way once whilst listening to some Zapp initially. 

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You don't discover music, music discovers you. Just let it happen. It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop. All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.

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lowcompany.co.uk/

clone.nl/

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zebox

vitaminic

myspace

soundclick

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www.acidplanet.com

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Posted (edited)

in order of most useful

 

youtube,

friends and family,

mixcloud,

bandcamp,

films,

listening to artists who have featured/collaborated with ones I know,

going through record labels,

Soundcloud,

fb groups,

gig openers,

my mate who sends me noise projects that make my ears bleed.

Edited by MadellisTheSixth

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most important place for me is hardwax as well. great selection and lots of artists and labels i've never heard of. but it's mostly the pre-selection of the guys at hardwax that's appreciated. i'm happy to be able to surf on their selections. they're making my life easier. bandcamp is an interesting alternative where you basically create your own feed by following artists, label and other people. but i still havent found a mr hardwax on bandcamp, if you know what i mean. so it's more difficult to discover interesting new music on bandcamp, imo.

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The New & Upcoming Releases subforum, YouTube, SoundCloud, following some labels (Skam and Touch probably the favorites), occasionally hearing something played (I found gqom like this recently), sometimes some net radio stations or then I just go browse Bleep or similar by genre for whatever I'm currently in mood for.

 

Youtube autoplay has introduced me to some artists that I hadn't heard before. Particularly when it comes to deep or dub techno.

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Posted (edited)

Watmm mostly and random yt

...but I cant find new music that is good enough for me to listent to it more than once and if it is itz just somethnig old that i havent heard before :(

Edited by xox

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My Release Radar on Spotify is surprisingly decent.

 

I'm also on the mailing lists for Boomkat & Phonica.

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Sc

Slsk

Back in the day there was allmusic.com

 

Man allmusic.com was such an education for me, I browsed it a lot from 2003-2005 or so. My family had DSL so I couldn't listen to previews, I just had to go by what few CDs I had and what I heard on the radio (mostly big beat and trance at the time on local stations) and imagine what a lot of the genres sounded like. Wikipedia was so iffy back then that it served as a really solid canon of music history.

 

2019 - Spotify and lastfm recs (use the former a lot more now, lastfm was invaluable but its redundant now)

 

WATMM is pretty damn helpful though other niche forums and subreddits are often good. Blogs 10 years ago were great but most of that excellent niche content is no found via insta accounts or YT uploads. 

I don't fuck with soundcloud much but you can easily stumble into great stuff. Speaking of...

 

Nothing really beats getting into local DIY music either via SC and bandcamp - there's an added dimension when you get into music by people who you can talk to IRL or via email. EKT releases, cassette labels, local record shops. Back in 2013 I took a break from online music recs and dove into undeground cassette labels. It was very liberating.

 

Tiny Mixtapes, Resident Advisor, Quietus, CoS, are all pretty good. FACT and Red Bull put out great features often. 

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My Release Radar on Spotify is surprisingly decent.

 

I'm also on the mailing lists for Boomkat & Phonica.

 

It went from iffy to great over the years. Discovery playlist too. Still get occasional bullshit payola indie artists (usually some indie pop bullshit project with one song yet a 2 paragraph write up) or some weird shit from Russia with a name of an existing artist I like. Other than that it's very much honed into my specific taste.

 

They added a "don't like" option that lets you flag recs you don't dig. Helps a lot. Their "similar artists" function is as good as lastfm now.

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Posted (edited)

Before streaming the biggest source of new music for me was the person behind the counter at the record shop/s. When I was buying records every week and got to know the owners and buyers, often they would get to know my tastes and sometimes order in things for me knowing that I would buy them. I owe most of the best records in my collection to a few brilliant staff members over the years.

 

Obviously now you can preview everything online, but I do miss that interaction and having someone play you something that is completely outside your wheelhouse and open up a whole new area of music to explore. Not that it isn't still possible, I just don't walk into a record shop more than every couple of months nowadays. 

Edited by Crossword Enthusiast

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Nothing really beats getting into local DIY music either via SC and bandcamp - there's an added dimension when you get into music by people who you can talk to IRL or via email.

Lol yes if you live in berlin of london

Try the shithole where i live!

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Nothing really beats getting into local DIY music either via SC and bandcamp - there's an added dimension when you get into music by people who you can talk to IRL or via email.

Lol yes if you live in berlin of london

Try the shithole where i live!

 

 

To clarfiy I mean people from your region via online communities. DIY live gigs for experimental are pretty scant if you aren't in a big city.

 

You'd be surprised. Even though Austin has a plethora of labels I've also found stuff from Houston, Denton, DFW. I've heard stuff from places like Idaho, rural Canada, East Europe, Indonesia via tape labels. Poland has a strong footwork scene. A lot of excellent techno, grime, and house has come out of East Europe and Russia. WWWINGS were three producers who lived in completely different regions of Russia. If there's still an upside to social media and the internet it's the DIY scene communication channels.

 

A podcast I forgot to mention that I find a Tabs Out Podcast and they are from Delaware, about the last place you'd expect great experimental / underground music. 

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Posted (edited)

 

 

Nothing really beats getting into local DIY music either via SC and bandcamp - there's an added dimension when you get into music by people who you can talk to IRL or via email.

Lol yes if you live in berlin of london

Try the shithole where i live!

 

 

To clarfiy I mean people from your region via online communities. DIY live gigs for experimental are pretty scant if you aren't in a big city.

 

You'd be surprised. Even though Austin has a plethora of labels I've also found stuff from Houston, Denton, DFW. I've heard stuff from places like Idaho, rural Canada, East Europe, Indonesia via tape labels. Poland has a strong footwork scene. A lot of excellent techno, grime, and house has come out of East Europe and Russia. WWWINGS were three producers who lived in completely different regions of Russia. If there's still an upside to social media and the internet it's the DIY scene communication channels.

 

A podcast I forgot to mention that I find a Tabs Out Podcast and they are from Delaware, about the last place you'd expect great experimental / underground music. 

 

 

I used to live in Butthole, Northern Wastelands of Finland, pop. 40,000 and even there was some local minimalist techno and ambient scene that intertwined with the demo/tracker scene back in the 90s.

 

Edit: it would be brilliant to hear those tracks again, but jfc they are hard to find

Edited by mokz

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Before streaming the biggest source of new music for me was the person behind the counter at the record shop/s. When I was buying records every week and got to know the owners and buyers, often they would get to know my tastes and sometimes order in things for me knowing that I would buy them. I owe most of the best records in my collection to a few brilliant staff members over the years.

 

Obviously now you can preview everything online, but I do miss that interaction and having someone play you something that is completely outside your wheelhouse and open up a whole new area of music to explore. Not that it isn't still possible, I just don't walk into a record shop more than every couple of months nowadays. 

sweet, I had something similar, though very short-lived, when living briefly in Baton Rouge, LA. One of the buyers turned me to on the J.J. Cale album Naturally, still really like that, and some Bill Evans albums that I had not heard until then, like Undercurrent. Apparently Bill Evans is buried in Baton Rouge. I tried unsuccessfully to find his grave one Saturday. Wanted to thank him for 'Peace Piece.' RIP Bill!

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Nothing really beats getting into local DIY music either via SC and bandcamp - there's an added dimension when you get into music by people who you can talk to IRL or via email.

Lol yes if you live in berlin of london

Try the shithole where i live!

 

 

To clarfiy I mean people from your region via online communities. DIY live gigs for experimental are pretty scant if you aren't in a big city.

 

You'd be surprised. Even though Austin has a plethora of labels I've also found stuff from Houston, Denton, DFW. I've heard stuff from places like Idaho, rural Canada, East Europe, Indonesia via tape labels. Poland has a strong footwork scene. A lot of excellent techno, grime, and house has come out of East Europe and Russia. WWWINGS were three producers who lived in completely different regions of Russia. If there's still an upside to social media and the internet it's the DIY scene communication channels.

 

A podcast I forgot to mention that I find a Tabs Out Podcast and they are from Delaware, about the last place you'd expect great experimental / underground music. 

 

 

I used to live in Butthole, Northern Wastelands of Finland, pop. 40,000 and even there was some local minimalist techno and ambient scene that intertwined with the demo/tracker scene back in the 90s.

 

Edit: it would be brilliant to hear those tracks again, but jfc they are hard to find

 

 

Did some of that stuff cross over into Skwee. I feel like North Scandinavia has had pretty healthy music scenes for all genres historically compared to some other sized countries. Indie rock, metal and electronic especially.

 

It's crazy how much of 90s and 00s music in the form of mp3s, .wavs, and CD-Rs has been lost to the ether. God knows how much is sitting on forgotten hard drives and servers. Almost seems more unaccounted for and obscure than a lot of tapes and vinyl that crop up from the 80s and earlier.

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Did some of that stuff cross over into Skwee. I feel like North Scandinavia has had pretty healthy music scenes for all genres historically compared to some other sized countries. Indie rock, metal and electronic especially.

 

 

Nah, it was more like Pan Sonic meets Plastikman type of stuff and then some found sound ambient pieces from what I can remember, but that was more than 20 years ago so my memory is quite hazy on this.

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Did some of that stuff cross over into Skwee. I feel like North Scandinavia has had pretty healthy music scenes for all genres historically compared to some other sized countries. Indie rock, metal and electronic especially.

 

 

Nah, it was more like Pan Sonic meets Plastikman type of stuff and then some found sound ambient pieces from what I can remember, but that was more than 20 years ago so my memory is quite hazy on this.

 

Ah gotcha, yeah I was way off Skwee is way closer to mid-00s dubstep / uk garage derivatives. 

 

I suppose stuff like glitch, dub techno, demoscene related tracker stuff etc is closer related. Vladislav Delay would of been active then too I realize.

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zebox

vitaminic

myspace

soundclick

Oldskool lol.

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Back in the day when I were lad it was all about tape swapping lol. After that it was basically going to the record shops and looking for new / old records depending on what I was into at the time. Anyways I've always searched for new music I guess as I've grown tired of listening to one style I'll hop onto something else whether it be electro, funk, fusion, krautrock, hip hop, techno, house, jungle, acid etc. In the past I'd find out what an artist I liked was listening to then check that out for instance I remember reading Squarepusher was into Weather Report so went and bought 'Heavy Weather'. Now discovering music is a bit dull / uninspired e.g. Youtube, Instagram and Facebook where I spend a lot of time. Although I remember when dubstep / grime kicked off it was quite exciting for me in fact very exciting so I'd discover a lot of stuff through Myspace etc.

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