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Teenage Engineering x Ghostly Pocket Operator

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Pocket synth/music gadget makers Teenage Engineering have teamed up with record label Ghostly International to create the PO33, a pocket operator: https://www.teenageengineering.com/store

 

 

 

Pocket Operator that crams a mini sampler -- complete with built-in microphone for recording sounds -- into your... well, pocket.
 
The new PO-33 offers the same basic tools as the original, only this version houses "unique sounds" from electronic artist Steve Hauschildt (you may know him as a member of Emeralds). Hauschildt is an artist on the record label Ghostly International (also home to the likes of Com Truise and Tycho), which Teenage Engineering teamed up with for this special release mini instrument. Hence the name "Ghostly Edition."
 
Teenage Engineering PO-33 Ghostly Edition
 
In addition to the built-in microphone for recording your samples, the PO-33 K.O! has a sequencer, 16 effects and parameter locks. There's also 8 melodic sample slots and 8 drum slots with 40 seconds worth of sample memory. You can build your loops aloud thanks to an onboard speaker or use the 3.5mm jack for headphones or audio output to a more robust setup. As with all Pocket Operators, there's a neat animated LCD display, folding kickstand and clock/alarm clock. And it runs on just two AAA batteries.

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probably their worst collaboration. charging a ~$46 premium for "unique" presets you'll want to overwrite (or only use a fraction of the machines potential).

 

stupid

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The PO-33 KO! was released more than a year ago. I believe this is just a limited edition with some kind of paint job, perhaps a ROM with different factory data?

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$50 of Tycho samples

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probably their worst collaboration. charging a ~$46 premium for "unique" presets you'll want to overwrite (or only use a fraction of the machines potential).

 

stupid

Yes and it's likely they'll occupy more space than the OG's procedurally generated presets, i.e. it'll be a somewhat larger hassle to clear them to create your own samples.

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This is a genius incapsulation of everything wrong with the gear market. I do think most of the hype has gone to seed now but TE will be able to sellout new products for a while.

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what's wrong with the gear market?


all seems Very Good atm.

very heavily marketed out there. but it's resulting in lots of people buying stuff. lots of companies selling lots of stuff. giving companies opportunities to do more shit, pump out more products. 

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Posted (edited)

Using a certain overly popularized style of music to market products designed to make that style of music, which results in further propagation of that style, further diluting the global sound pool with low quality imitations of a style of music that is already (arguably) pastiche to begin with.

 

The gear market is becoming a major driver of conceptual pollution.

 

It’s kind of like what the iPhone and Instagram did to photography. If everyone can make something or perceives that that thing is easy to make, it starts to lose cultural power.

 

(Hello Spiral is banned from reading or replying to this post.)

Edited by sheathe

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The gear market is becoming a major driver of conceptual pollution.

It’s kind of like what the iPhone and Instagram did to photography. If everyone can make something or perceives that that thing is easy to make, it starts to lose cultural power.

(Hello Spiral is banned from reading or replying to this post.)

I think we passed that moment in music a long time ago.

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i still reckon the pocket operator stuff is a pretty specific example, and less reflective of whats going on in the market. 

pop some clever people behind elektron gear, or some eurorack setups, or ableton with a small handful of newly released synths, and you'll still be able to get unique results out of it. 

 

there being massive trends of people just doing same old shit on everything is more just a reflection on the audience i reckon.. and the low easy access entry point getting into music making now + internet making it too easy to be able to share your work instantly. 

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Using a certain overly popularized style of music to market products designed to make that style of music, which results in further propagation of that style, further diluting the global sound pool with low quality imitations of a style of music that is already (arguably) pastiche to begin with.

 

The gear market is becoming a major driver of conceptual pollution.

 

It’s kind of like what the iPhone and Instagram did to photography. If everyone can make something or perceives that that thing is easy to make, it starts to lose cultural power.

 

(Hello Spiral is banned from reading or replying to this post.)

 

:^)

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The gear market is becoming a major driver of conceptual pollution.

 

It’s kind of like what the iPhone and Instagram did to photography. If everyone can make something or perceives that that thing is easy to make, it starts to lose cultural power.

 

I'm a bit sick of this attitude tbh. It just seems like gatekeeping to me. I'm happy that music making is more accessible now than it ever has been in the history of music. I do get frustrated sometimes when people have very basic questions and don't take the time to read manuals, or use google etc, but in general I think it's a good thing that there are people out there picking up music software, entry-level gear etc and just giving it a go. 

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Well, there’s certainly a booming sample pack market.

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Posted (edited)

If everyone can make something or perceives that that thing is easy to make, it starts to lose cultural power.

This is a bad thing? I'm all for making it easier for the general population to be creative.

 

Or perhaps you're objecting to the narrow cultural viewpoint of tying a specific musical brand to a creative medium?

 

I do get frustrated sometimes when people have very basic questions and don't take the time to read manuals, or use google

I relate with this too, but I try to be patient. It IS hard to not get frustrated with people who don't even want to know how to do the most basic things on their gear though. I had a friend ask to create a bunch of drum patterns on the machinedrum just so they could cue them up instead of programming their own beats.  :cerious:

Edited by paranerd

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I don't know man. Have ya'll seen Ratatouille? Great movie. The point is NOT that anyone can cook, but that a good cook can come from anywhere.

 

Blind optimism about universality can and has lead to rather dark/bland eras.

 

or, to go off in a completely tangental direction, just apply the "how can more people having access to something be bad?" to gun ownership.

 

i know, guns actually kill the body, but bad synth arps kill the soul.

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:facepalm:

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I think different people buy different gear for different reasons, most of which are boring or can make you feel cynical. And that's ok. That doesn't mean they are ruining it for everyone else. That doesn't mean that you can't take overpriced/toy gear (which will probably create a nice little surplus/secondhand micro-market in a few months) and make decent tunes. Just do you.

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Well, there’s certainly a booming sample pack market.

 

I saw a need for it and I jumped on it. It's the opposite to gatekeeping. I want electronic music to be more accessible so I'm allowing people to get started with some nice sounds that aren't just the factory presets.

 

or, to go off in a completely tangental direction, just apply the "how can more people having access to something be bad?" to gun ownership.

 

This is such a ridiculous argument that I don't even know how to start responding to it.

 

I think different people buy different gear for different reasons, most of which are boring or can make you feel cynical. And that's ok. That doesn't mean they are ruining it for everyone else. That doesn't mean that you can't take overpriced/toy gear (which will probably create a nice little surplus/secondhand micro-market in a few months) and make decent tunes. Just do you.

 

Yep, this 100%. Why would it ruin what we do? It's not like there's any money in IDM anyway lol

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remember the good old days when homemade idm was released on weird netlabels as freely downloadable zips ? 

now everything's ruined because soundcloud has made it easier to find music and bandcamp has made it easier to distribute and have artists sell their work for money. everything's turned to shit now, and it's no coincidence that it happened precisely as the MS2000 was downsized into the more affordable more preset-reliant microkorg. dark times indeed. 

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Posted (edited)

as much as i like looking at reddit /wearethemusicmakers at giggling at all the "how do i make this very specific Trap genre song?" posts, i do think the influx of more people in the scene and buying stuff, is only making the market better and more interesting ultimately.

Edited by bitchroast

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remember the good old days when homemade idm was released on weird netlabels as freely downloadable zips ? 

now everything's ruined because soundcloud has made it easier to find music and bandcamp has made it easier to distribute and have artists sell their work for money. everything's turned to shit now, and it's no coincidence that it happened precisely as the MS2000 was downsized into the more affordable more preset-reliant microkorg. dark times indeed. 

Remember the good old days when electronic music was only made by academics and was highly experimental and non-tonal?

Now everything's ruined because Moog had to come along and put a piano keyboard! Who would have thought, a piano keyboard! On a synth! Now anyone can come along and play this lame melodic music that everyone is making these days instead of it being restricted to us boffins in labs recording single passes of test equipment to tape. 

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Posted (edited)

Delia Derbyshire quit making electronic music with the invention of the minimoog lol

i think i remember interviews with her pretty much expressing that exact sentiment ^ 

Edited by bitchroast

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what an edgelordlady

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Posted (edited)

if there is nothing wrong with electronic music right now, why do i see so many formerly successful artists bemoaning their plight on twitter? seems like djs are the only ones who get any traction.

 

oh well. everyone has vocal chords, but it doesn't mean singing goes out of style. i guess it can be the same thing. i don't know why i'm even talking about it in a literal sense, since i don't have much gear at all. it's more of the larger metaphor of the state I (and many others) feel we are in.

 

sorry guys. just trying to vent frustrations.

 

i'm sorry for everyone i've hurt.

 

sorry steve.

 

edit: source for my "and many others" claim

 

https://twitter.com/samvoltek/status/1068620305248239616

Edited by sheathe

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