Jump to content

Burial - Claustro / State Forest


 Share

Recommended Posts

For me he has already out done untrue with Kindred and rival dealer.

I could live with never getting another album if he did some more eps of that length & quality  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/16/2019 at 8:15 PM, StephenG said:

Tiesto > Burial....

Sorry ?

 

 

did you know Tiesto makes EDM that gets featured in kid's movies now?

I didn't until my kid watched Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"clausto" had a very catchy groove to it, akin to "raver" off untrue

I was really surprised "state forest" was not just a straight up ambient track but probably the best percussion-less / minimal percussion track he's made

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

the b side is fucking lovley but to be honest the a side got a bit annoying after a minute and a half. really like the more rave-y exploration but it just got a bit irritating.

cool to see burial is still experimenting with different areas of the style though, got me more excited for future releases for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't even know why people bother with comparing new singles to the 2004-2006 albums. They're different things. 'Lightning in a Bottle' is an apt comparison. These are still fucking good tracks, but in another 12 years people will still just be talking about the two albums...

In isolation, Claustro is a good record. 

Edited by Earth
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Let's go over Burial's releases so far, and try to find a pattern
(skipping his collabs with artists, as the four tet and massive attack releases have massive influence and sway over the sound, from the collaborating musicians):

South London Boroughs - Deconstruction of dubstep and garage. Still hasn't fully developed his style, but there is a skeletal outline of what is to proceed. Nothing is quantized.

Burial - Ambient side begins to uncover itself as well as vocals. Still not fully developed, even if skeletal and unique.

Ghost Hardware - a sign of what is to come - fully incorporated and manipulated vocals.

Untrue - Fully incorporates and manipulates vocals. Takes ambiance incorporated behind skeletal drums to go on and practically create a genre of imitators - future garage. Notice that Burial's interpretation of dubstep and garage is already so beyond anyone else's that people label it "future" garage.

Street Halo - Burial lengthens and extends songs, learning how to more properly flesh out his tracks. The first track is South London Burroughs quadrupled in magnitude. NYC and Stolen Dog demonstrate that Burial has mastered his synth and drum styling and doesn't need to rely on vocals. This is as far as imitators get in their imitating, as past this point Burial is so far ahead of the rest of the people creating garage and dubstep he becomes unimitatable even to his best imitators. See Volor Flex.

Kindred EP - Burial enhances the before limited genre of garage and dubstep into a sign of it reaching it's highest stages (that of the lengthening and complexifying of the song to express more ideas, just like the creation of prog rock from rock). The opener sounds seismic and embarrasses all other garage and dubstep music immediately. A mastery of all elements of his sounds can be found in the first song alone. The drums are the most catchy and active of his whole career. The ambiance is thicker than even untrue. The vocals float over the track, controlling the direction of the song. Burial progresses his songs seamlessly. Loner is Burials most exciting track yet, the synth arpeggio overpowering and leading the track instead of what would commonly be the vocals. Ashtray wasp is the two songs combined into Burials best song yet, what might be the height of his career. Burial, in this release, eclipses garage as well as his past music.

Truant / Rough Sleeper - Burial simplifies his style a bit, becoming more ambient and less able to progress his tracks without splitting them up into as many as five distinct parts. While he is still far above all of garage and dubstep, he begins to push too far past the genre. He redeems himself with rough sleeper, which stands alongside Ashtray wasp in its rushing oneiric drums and synths that embody Burial's career.

Rival Dealer - What would be the declining and simplification of garage if it wasn't just burial making it, which luckily he is. This simplification continues. While the opener recalls Loner and also sounds giant, it's drums begin to feel simplified. The second song shows faults in burials pitch-shifting, and its drums sound like they were completely quantized. Come down to us progresses itself, and incorporates vocals very well, but it's drums feel so simplified, as well as the tracks quantized rhythm. Burial is declining.

Young Death / Nightmarket - Burial has simplified his tracks and his style declined to a point where his drums are entirely quantized, and arpeggiated synths rule the track instead of the drums or vocals, only lacking the intensity of rival dealer and loner, and more resembling his collaborations with four tet.

Subtemple - Reaches the final stage of garage, the complete loss of structure (using the rock example from before, think rock to post-rock). Burials progression of garage is now just ambiance.

Rodent - House track. Burial now resorts to the combination of garage with other styles because he doesn't know how to progress it anymore.

Pre Dawn / Indoors - See comment above about burial resorting to other genres because he doesn't know how to progress his sound anymore and so combines it with other genres.

and now
Claustro / State Forest:

Explanation
As we can see from above, Burial alone finishes garage, taking it through the incline and decline and subsequent death that any genre goes through:

It started with an idea with concrete rules, that idea was built upon as more rules were added, that idea was mastered and complexified, that idea was so complex it needed to increase the length of its songs, that idea became so ambitious that it started to become a bit simplified, that idea lost its primary rules, that idea needed to progress and so completed itself by becoming ambiance, that idea died and serves as a tool to incorporate into genres that are still "alive" so to say.

And through this, we can predict why Claustro / State Forest came to be: Burial didn't know how to progress garage, and so tried incorporating it into another genre (Techno), and completing it by becoming ambiance (State Forest).

But one still has to commend Burial for his genius in progressing a whole genre to its end singlehandedly, while even the people who are solely trying to imitate him cannot catch up.

Published
Edited by beer badger
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

read that review ^^^ on rate your music the other day, I thought whoever the dude is who wrote it, hit my opinion of Burial right on the head

awesome piece of writing 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, beer badger said:

 

Let's go over Burial's releases so far, and try to find a pattern
(skipping his collabs with artists, as the four tet and massive attack releases have massive influence and sway over the sound, from the collaborating musicians):

South London Boroughs - Deconstruction of dubstep and garage. Still hasn't fully developed his style, but there is a skeletal outline of what is to proceed. Nothing is quantized.

Burial - Ambient side begins to uncover itself as well as vocals. Still not fully developed, even if skeletal and unique.

Ghost Hardware - a sign of what is to come - fully incorporated and manipulated vocals.

Untrue - Fully incorporates and manipulates vocals. Takes ambiance incorporated behind skeletal drums to go on and practically create a genre of imitators - future garage. Notice that Burial's interpretation of dubstep and garage is already so beyond anyone else's that people label it "future" garage.

Street Halo - Burial lengthens and extends songs, learning how to more properly flesh out his tracks. The first track is South London Burroughs quadrupled in magnitude. NYC and Stolen Dog demonstrate that Burial has mastered his synth and drum styling and doesn't need to rely on vocals. This is as far as imitators get in their imitating, as past this point Burial is so far ahead of the rest of the people creating garage and dubstep he becomes unimitatable even to his best imitators. See Volor Flex.

Kindred EP - Burial enhances the before limited genre of garage and dubstep into a sign of it reaching it's highest stages (that of the lengthening and complexifying of the song to express more ideas, just like the creation of prog rock from rock). The opener sounds seismic and embarrasses all other garage and dubstep music immediately. A mastery of all elements of his sounds can be found in the first song alone. The drums are the most catchy and active of his whole career. The ambiance is thicker than even untrue. The vocals float over the track, controlling the direction of the song. Burial progresses his songs seamlessly. Loner is Burials most exciting track yet, the synth arpeggio overpowering and leading the track instead of what would commonly be the vocals. Ashtray wasp is the two songs combined into Burials best song yet, what might be the height of his career. Burial, in this release, eclipses garage as well as his past music.

Truant / Rough Sleeper - Burial simplifies his style a bit, becoming more ambient and less able to progress his tracks without splitting them up into as many as five distinct parts. While he is still far above all of garage and dubstep, he begins to push too far past the genre. He redeems himself with rough sleeper, which stands alongside Ashtray wasp in its rushing oneiric drums and synths that embody Burial's career.

Rival Dealer - What would be the declining and simplification of garage if it wasn't just burial making it, which luckily he is. This simplification continues. While the opener recalls Loner and also sounds giant, it's drums begin to feel simplified. The second song shows faults in burials pitch-shifting, and its drums sound like they were completely quantized. Come down to us progresses itself, and incorporates vocals very well, but it's drums feel so simplified, as well as the tracks quantized rhythm. Burial is declining.

Young Death / Nightmarket - Burial has simplified his tracks and his style declined to a point where his drums are entirely quantized, and arpeggiated synths rule the track instead of the drums or vocals, only lacking the intensity of rival dealer and loner, and more resembling his collaborations with four tet.

Subtemple - Reaches the final stage of garage, the complete loss of structure (using the rock example from before, think rock to post-rock). Burials progression of garage is now just ambiance.

Rodent - House track. Burial now resorts to the combination of garage with other styles because he doesn't know how to progress it anymore.

Pre Dawn / Indoors - See comment above about burial resorting to other genres because he doesn't know how to progress his sound anymore and so combines it with other genres.

and now
Claustro / State Forest:

Explanation
As we can see from above, Burial alone finishes garage, taking it through the incline and decline and subsequent death that any genre goes through:

It started with an idea with concrete rules, that idea was built upon as more rules were added, that idea was mastered and complexified, that idea was so complex it needed to increase the length of its songs, that idea became so ambitious that it started to become a bit simplified, that idea lost its primary rules, that idea needed to progress and so completed itself by becoming ambiance, that idea died and serves as a tool to incorporate into genres that are still "alive" so to say.

And through this, we can predict why Claustro / State Forest came to be: Burial didn't know how to progress garage, and so tried incorporating it into another genre (Techno), and completing it by becoming ambiance (State Forest).

But one still has to commend Burial for his genius in progressing a whole genre to its end singlehandedly, while even the people who are solely trying to imitate him cannot catch up.

Published

* its

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/21/2010 at 6:24 PM, BobDobalina said:

You're walking down a dark alleyway on a cold, rainy night. Somewhere off in the distance, a singer croons soulful, evocative lamentations through the ethereal fog which permeates your inner-city existence. Around the corner, you hear the sound of a bullet casing hitting the worn, broken concrete, almost as if it were happening in slow motion. Suddenly the eerily familiar, almost too familiar, clickety-clack of a lightly-syncopated drumbeat descends upon you, punctuating the rise of Mary Anne Hobbes' spectre from a nearby skip. Slowly it dawns on you that there's no way out; you're stuck in every Burial song ever made.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...
1 hour ago, species8472 said:

a new burial release that nobody wanted:

https://burial.bandcamp.com/

 

Dunno, I've been banging on about getting all these recent EPs released on a CD compilation for a long time, so I'm (mostly) happy with this. Sad that Rodent isn't on there, that would make it the complete Hyperdub sessions... ah well. I can sell off my 10"s and 2011-2013 EPs and just have it all on this set. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Technically it ends with NYC which includes that "don't rush me, I'll get at you when I am at you" whatever the fuck that means, especially since NYC was one of the first songs made in this collection of newer collections of pasted together wips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disc 1 ends with Rival Dealer, but there's easily enough room on there for Rodent, it would work well before Claustro too. Strange that he left it off. 

 

lol first reply on Twitter: "No vinyl?"

Edited by purlieu
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By jules
      Happy Holidays all
       
      As the scene's keenest scribe-cum-producer, Blackdown's blog and Keysound label were at the core of the genre’s early sound, placing him in proximity to key players including Burial. Like we mentioned, Burial’s remix of ‘Crackle Blues’ in 2006 was, just like his debut 12”, sorely overlooked at the time, and remains one of his tightest and most effective garagey/woodblock productions.
      On the ’Shock Power Of Love’ EP they check in 15 years later for a 2-step pow wow, passing the peace-pipe over cuts of Detroit-inspired garage and deep-fried, crispy London soul music. Blackdown gives clear nods to his 313 inspiration on both sides, framing his restless subs and garage swing with sampled, house declarations and soaring pads in ‘The Journey VIP’ while nodding to Juan Atkins and Red Planet via Geeneus in a remix of Heatmap’s ‘Arklight.’ Burial is at his signature best on the other two, frothing choral vocals into a scissored 2-step shuffle on ‘Dark Gethsemane’ before rolling out fathoms deep into the iridescent trance leads and scalp-stroking Reese bass licks of ’Space Cadet.’
       
      https://boomkat.com/products/shock-power-of-love-ep
       
      https://burial.bandcamp.com/album/shock-power-of-love-ep
    • By fumi
      It's that time of year. This just showed up on Japanese website Ototoy.
      https://ototoy.jp/_/default/p/650204
      It just wouldn't be Christmas otherwise. 
    • By fumi
      It's Christmas. That means one thing. Or maybe not.
       
      Would rather have had one killer Christmas track than staggered eps of blandness all year.
       
      What say the WATMM massif?
    • By fumi
      Out on Friday. I know, the 'Burial' sound is something everyone either likes or doesn't. Sometimes I think it's nothing more than some crackling effects and tape hiss but probably there is more to it than that.
      Personally, I love the Burial mix on this. The other tracks are also good.
      https://bleep.com/release/207148-charles-webster-feat-ingrid-chavez-burial-the-spell-burial-mix
    • By Rubin Farr
      https://soundcloud.com/osirismusic-uk/monic-burial-deep-summer-osiris-music-uk
       
      https://bleep.com/release/86887-mnic-deep-summer-burial-remix?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Post&utm_campaign=Mønic%20Deep%20Summer%20(Burial%20Remix)
×
×
  • Create New...