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UK Crimbo Election 2019 - UPDATED WITH POLLOL


Soloman Tump
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UK Crimbo Election 2019 - Voting Intention  

41 members have voted

  1. 1. Who gets your vote?

    • Conservatives
      3
    • Labour
      21
    • Liberal Democract
      7
    • Green
      0
    • Brexit
      1
    • SNP
      0
    • Plaid Cymru
      5
    • Independent / Other
      1
    • Not voting
      2
    • Spoilt Vote
      1

This poll is closed to new votes

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  • Poll closed on 12/16/19 at 09:28 AM

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Welsh is strong in Gwynedd and Ceredigion (i.e. where Plaid gets votes) which are more sedentary and rural. In the South there's a much more mobile and better connected population, so there's a lack of transmission between generations. It's slowly coming back though thanks to more emphasis in schools

Lovely language, I don't speak it but am very familiar with it. I grew up right on the border, English village with a Welsh name, if I lived two fields over I would have learnt Welsh at school

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i believe the US version of liberalism is different to the european version....

to a certain degree centrist has nothing to do with an ideology. like caze argued, right or left is irrelevant. centrist policies come from having a pragmatic approach: find out what works the best, given the circumstances. (that could change over time, btw) without a single ideology guiding towards a specific direction. or representing a specific part of the population. done right, it's progressive. meaning, with an open eye to improve things. not to keep things as they are.

generally speaking, people have a hard time determining where (progressive) centrist parties come from. as the first thing people try to do is to put political parties in a box. left, right, etc. because that's how politics usually makes sense. a party usually represents a specific group of people with specific needs. Or, a specific philosophy about how to run a country. centrist parties are basically all over the place and not easily boxed. and therefore, often misunderstood.

it takes a pragmatic mind to understand one, if you will.

perhaps eclectic is a better term?

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7 minutes ago, goDel said:

i believe the US version of liberalism is different to the european version....

to a certain degree centrist has nothing to do with an ideology. like caze argued, right or left is irrelevant. centrist policies come from having a pragmatic approach: find out what works the best, given the circumstances. (that could change over time, btw) without a single ideology guiding towards a specific direction. or representing a specific part of the population. done right, it's progressive. meaning, with an open eye to improve things. not to keep things as they are.

generally speaking, people have a hard time determining where (progressive) centrist parties come from. as the first thing people try to do is to put political parties in a box. left, right, etc. because that's how politics usually makes sense. a party usually represents a specific group of people with specific needs. Or, a specific philosophy about how to run a country. centrist parties are basically all over the place and not easily boxed. and therefore, often misunderstood.

it takes a pragmatic mind to understand one, if you will.

perhaps eclectic is a better term?

Which party wouldn't describe itself as pragmatic? Any party from left to right would define itself like you just defined "centrist". It's basically a platitude

Edited by darreichungsform
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no, most parties have a clear starting point. greens focus on the green stuff. the religious conservative parties have a hard time with stuff like abortion and euthanasia. parties which focus on supporting businesses. and the socialist parties focus on the rights of workers, for instance. there's always a specific ideology, philosophy, or religion guiding their priorities and policies.

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In the end I voted Lib Dem, but it was a massive Tory majority in my boro' once again.

Still, I'll take a majority government over a hung one any day.  Lets roll with it and see what happens.  Plenty of talk of unity and the NHS today - lets see if BoJo can walk the walk.

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5 minutes ago, goDel said:

no, most parties have a clear starting point. greens focus on the green stuff. the religious conservative parties have a hard time with stuff like abortion and euthanasia. parties which focus on supporting businesses. and the socialist parties focus on the rights of workers, for instance. there's always a specific ideology, philosophy, or religion guiding their priorities and policies.

What does the youth in Asia have to do with all of this?

:dadjoke:

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21 minutes ago, goDel said:

i believe the US version of liberalism is different to the european version....

to a certain degree centrist has nothing to do with an ideology. like caze argued, right or left is irrelevant. centrist policies come from having a pragmatic approach: find out what works the best, given the circumstances. (that could change over time, btw) without a single ideology guiding towards a specific direction. or representing a specific part of the population. done right, it's progressive. meaning, with an open eye to improve things. not to keep things as they are.

generally speaking, people have a hard time determining where (progressive) centrist parties come from. as the first thing people try to do is to put political parties in a box. left, right, etc. because that's how politics usually makes sense. a party usually represents a specific group of people with specific needs. Or, a specific philosophy about how to run a country. centrist parties are basically all over the place and not easily boxed. and therefore, often misunderstood.

it takes a pragmatic mind to understand one, if you will.

perhaps eclectic is a better term?

It's hard not to elaborate and tangent off on this topic but I would say broadly speaking centrism / moderate positions are fine as a pragmatic and progressive compromise but not as a de-facto or default position. Otherwise you get what we've seen in the US and elsewhere: shifting overton windows and late-stage capitalism because of failing and diluted long-term policies.

The abandonment of true conservatism (i.e. sticking with what works, cautious policy changes) versus progressive movements (systematic changes in social and economic policies) in tern renders centrism as a false and delusional choice in many scenarios. 

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