Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 6.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

grandpa in the ICU .. doctors giving him a 50/50 chance. oof. miserable.

Well after 7 days in a row treating 40-odd patients daily without any available PPE I unsurprisingly came down with coronavirus symptoms on Monday. All feels a bit weird at home as my wife (who also

Thanks Jules!

Posted Images

4 hours ago, bupkis said:

I do not understand why she has air quotes when she says low risk talking about the threat to young people? I read before that for people 18 years old and younger have a one in a million chance of being killed by coronavirus.

There are still young people that have immunodefficiency diseases and even if they don't, they can still die from it. Also, they spread it around more. Lower risk to themselves maybe but not the olds around them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Braintree said:

There are still young people that have immunodefficiency diseases and even if they don't, they can still die from it. Also, they spread it around more. Lower risk to themselves maybe but not the olds around them.

Ok I understand, thank you for your reply. That video just struck me as odd because the woman did not mention anything about young people spreading it to old and she made it seem like young people were going to somehow get the virus and go into cardiac arrest or something. I also checked the comments on that tweet from the doctor that she mentions and a few people commented that this thing she was so worried about OOH arrests was actually standard protocal in that region from way before the pandemic and the doctor also replied saying it was not his area of expertise.

I have been trying to understand the coronavirus and all the policies to help fight it recently and it is very difficult because so many people seem to focus on the political side and confuse info about the public health side of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, bupkis said:

I have been trying to understand the coronavirus and all the policies to help fight it recently and it is very difficult because so many people seem to focus on the political side and confuse info about the public health side of it.

It's not difficult. Read only fact-based sources (scientific, peer reviewed, with citations) with recent dates. If you're in the USA, maybe read sources from outside your country. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

more reports of frontline workers refusing vaccination

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-12-31/healthcare-workers-refuse-covid-19-vaccine-access

Quote

They are frontline workers with top-priority access to the COVID-19 vaccine, but they are refusing to take it.

At St. Elizabeth Community Hospital in Tehama County, fewer than half of the 700 hospital workers eligible for the vaccine were willing to take the shot when it was first offered. At Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills, one in five frontline nurses and doctors have declined the shot. Roughly 20% to 40% of L.A. County’s frontline workers who were offered the vaccine did the same, according to county public health officials.

some hospitals begin offering monetary incentives to be vaccinated

https://www.wfmz.com/news/area/lehighvalley/gracedale-staff-to-be-offered-750-to-get-covid-19-vaccine/article_30f97fa8-40bc-11eb-98ce-d740a5e5cd15.html

Quote

EASTON, Pa. – Northampton County will offer staff members of Gracedale, the county nursing home, $750 each to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

That could cost as much as $490,000 if all 650 employees get the shot. The payment is an incentive. County Executive Lamont McClure said employees cannot be required to get the shots.

ImageImage

Link to post
Share on other sites

wasn't sure if the mutant strain was a media thing or what. zeynep is someone to take seriously

Quote

...

I dismissed the news initially because viruses mutate all the time and there have been too many baseless “mutant-ninja virus” doomsaying headlines this year. The exaggerated, clickbaity alarmism makes it harder to discern real threats from sensationalism. Given the constant reality of mutation, genomic variants should be considered innocent until proved guilty. Even an increase in the proportion of cases attributable to a particular variant is not definitive proof of an evolutionary advantage.

However, as data on the new variant roll in, there is cause for real concern. Trevor Bedford, a scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a board member for the Covid Tracking Project at The Atlantic, points out that infections from the new variant are increasing very rapidly among the population in the U.K. Bedford also notes that this new variant seems to have a higher secondary-attack rate—meaning the number of people subsequently infected by a known case—compared with “regular” COVID-19.  Finally, the new variant seems to result in higher viral loads (though this is harder to be sure about as viral loads can be affected by sampling bias and timing). As Kucharski told me, all of this does not rule out other explanations. This increased transmission could be due to chance or founder effects—meaning one variant just happened to get somewhere before the other variants and then got “lucky”; it was early, rather than more transmissible. It could be due to changed behavior among people—quarantine fatigue, less masking—leading to more rapid spread. However, given the current evidence, along with the specifics of the mutation, it’s getting harder to assume that those other explanations are more likely than the simple proposition that this is truly a more transmissible variant.

So how much more transmissible? We aren’t completely sure yet, but the initial estimates from the data suggest that this variant could be about 50 to 70 percent more transmissible than regular COVID-19. To make matters thornier, we aren’t yet exactly sure why it’s more transmissible, though reasonable theories are already being tested. This variant, now called B.1.1.7, has “an unusually large number of genetic changes, particularly in the spike protein,” which is how the virus gains entry into our cells. The new variant may be better at eluding our immune response and replicating, or be able to better bind to locations in our body more conducive to infecting others, but that is all speculative for the moment.

...

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2020/12/virus-mutation-catastrophe/617531/

one thing that made covid-19 not too bad was that it didn't spread super easily. without preventative measures employed, it seemed that the average infected person spread it to 2 to 3 other people. increasing that basic reproduction number by 50% (or more), we have a basic reproduction number around 4. 

reproduction number of 1 is linear, anything above 1 is exponential. the difference between 2 to 3 and 3 to 4.5 is significant. 

for the america crowd:

Spoiler

 

 

Edited by very honest
  • Facepalm 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^ that's (mar a lago party) some cringey shit. 

Edited by ignatius
Link to post
Share on other sites

i need to wait 16 more days to receive my second dose of the vaccine... i can't fakn wait!!!

several of my close colleagues almost died; they were young and healthy before, never smoked, very rarely drank alcohol, no drugs, exercised regularly, but they will probably have permanently injured lungs, some of them heaths too.

aaaand doctors refusing to get vaccinated?! that's the worst really! fakn morons!

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, xox said:

aaaand doctors refusing to get vaccinated?! that's the worst really! fakn morons!

Yes it is weird. I saw another article this time from the wall street journal about medical professionals from around america refusing vaccines. This one seems to focus on nursing assistants. Its weird because people like this probably saw the worst of covid lots of people dying from it and providing care for them.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/nursing-homes-grapple-with-staff-hesitant-to-get-the-covid-19-vaccine-11608477474?mod=e2tw

Quote

Ms. Williams, 40 years old, is a certified nursing assistant at St. James Veterans Home in St. James, Mo., and she says she is unlikely to agree to get the shots, even though her son is currently ill with Covid-19. She recently watched a webcast by nursing-home doctors about the safety and benefits of the vaccines, hoping for reassurance, but came away unconvinced.

She is still worried that a vaccine might make her anemia worse, and she thinks the shots are being authorized for broad usage too quickly.

“It’s too new,” she said. “I’m just not comfortable.”

more demographic info

Quote

A survey of 1,676 U.S. adults released Dec. 15 by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 71% would definitely or probably get a Covid-19 vaccine if it was found safe by scientists and offered free. Among the groups with the highest levels of vaccine hesitancy were Republicans, people aged 30 to 49, rural residents and Black adults. Also, 29% of those who said they worked in a health-care delivery setting said they would definitely not or probably not get vaccinated.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, ignatius said:

 

Maybe it's both 🤷‍♂️

  • Burger 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, xox said:

i need to wait 16 more days to receive my second dose of the vaccine... i can't fakn wait!!!

several of my close colleagues almost died; they were young and healthy before, never smoked, very rarely drank alcohol, no drugs, exercised regularly, but they will probably have permanently injured lungs, some of them heaths too.

aaaand doctors refusing to get vaccinated?! that's the worst really! fakn morons!

glad to have joined the club yesterday, experiencing no side effects whatsoever. lots of my elderly care nurse colleagues express similar concerns, tho... dunno, i think things will settle with wider availability, i absolutely can see private businesses in gastronomy, air travel, gyms etc. asking for some kind proof of immunity in the near future.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Official: Republican Pa. Rep. Mike Reese dies following apparent brain aneurysm, after testing positive for COVID-19

https://www.inquirer.com/politics/pennsylvania/mike-reese-gop-house-pennsylvania-republican-covid-19-coronavirus-20210103.html

Crazy. This virus is a fucker. How did trump survive? Oh right he got airlifted to a hospital and got the best possible treatment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Got my first shot today. Never been so excited about having a needle shoved in my arm.

Actually a little surprised I was able to get a spot, as I'm not technically a patient facing healthcare worker (though I do wander the clinics for work related stuffs). I actually wondered if it was from people refusing to be vaccinated and spots opening up, but I suspect it just because my hospital system actually has its shit together.

It's funny, even a few months ago I was like "well, I'm ok waiting a few months anyway, just to see what the side effects shake out." This AM:

 

giphy.gif

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, T3551ER said:

Got my first shot today. Never been so excited about having a needle shoved in my arm.

Actually a little surprised I was able to get a spot, as I'm not technically a patient facing healthcare worker (though I do wander the clinics for work related stuffs). I actually wondered if it was from people refusing to be vaccinated and spots opening up, but I suspect it just because my hospital system actually has its shit together.

It's funny, even a few months ago I was like "well, I'm ok waiting a few months anyway, just to see what the side effects shake out." This AM:

 

giphy.gif

Congrats!

Did you have to pay for it?  Just interested in how the US system for rollout is working.

Looking how far down the priority list I am, and how much of a shit storm the UK is right now, Ill be lucky to get vaccinated before Summer is out.  The NHS is overwhelmed with patients.  Im guessing vaccinations will eventually become available in the private sector and you will be able to pay for it if you can afford it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/01/04/er-doctors-covid-jobs/

Quote

many in this class of emergency medicine physicians — young doctors, called residents, who are training in this specialty — are struggling to find full-time employment, even while they work on the front lines treating covid-19 patients.

The dearth of jobs is the result of a domino effect: Many people stayed away from hospital emergency rooms this past year, wary of contracting the virus. As patient numbers dropped, emergency departments brought in less money. As a result, cash-strapped employers stopped recruiting new doctors.

“We’re putting our own lives at risk, our family’s lives at risk,” said emergency medicine physician R.J. Sontag, the president of the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association. “We’re in, frankly, a financially precarious position with a ton of debt and limited income. And the fact of the matter is that employers just aren’t hiring.”

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

^ kind of a marker for how piss poor of a job the US government has done in supporting its citizens and industries ^

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/amp/article/coronavirus-lab-escape-theory.html?__twitter_impression=true&s=04&fbclid=IwAR0uLrwtliS8Tg6d2vFG1aGk01Ee_WRdkiyxIa3rbBLjNUCW5uP1_zlgjp8

Quote

SARS-2 was not designed as a biological weapon. But it was, I think, designed. Many thoughtful people dismiss this notion, and they may be right. They sincerely believe that the coronavirus arose naturally, “zoonotically,” from animals, without having been previously studied, or hybridized, or sluiced through cell cultures, or otherwise worked on by trained professionals. They hold that a bat, carrying a coronavirus, infected some other creature, perhaps a pangolin, and that the pangolin may have already been sick with a different coronavirus disease, and out of the conjunction and commingling of those two diseases within the pangolin, a new disease, highly infectious to humans, evolved. Or they hypothesize that two coronaviruses recombined in a bat, and this new virus spread to other bats, and then the bats infected a person directly — in a rural setting, perhaps — and that this person caused a simmering undetected outbreak of respiratory disease, which over a period of months or years evolved to become virulent and highly transmissible but was not noticed until it appeared in Wuhan.

There is no direct evidence for these zoonotic possibilities, just as there is no direct evidence for an experimental mishap — no written confession, no incriminating notebook, no official accident report. Certainty craves detail, and detail requires an investigation. It has been a full year, 80 million people have been infected, and, surprisingly, no public investigation has taken place. We still know very little about the origins of this disease.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

SARS 1 was a civet

MERS (SARS 1.5) was a camel.

So naturally SARS 2 was designed.

:facepalm:

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Soloman Tump said:

Congrats!

Did you have to pay for it?  Just interested in how the US system for rollout is working.

Looking how far down the priority list I am, and how much of a shit storm the UK is right now, Ill be lucky to get vaccinated before Summer is out.  The NHS is overwhelmed with patients.  Im guessing vaccinations will eventually become available in the private sector and you will be able to pay for it if you can afford it.

Thanks friend! 

No, didn't have to pay, but I work for a healthcare system so don't believe anyone within the system is going to have to pay (also, believe this is going to be the case with all first responders/frontline folks). Yeah, it's going to be ... interesting to see how it shakes out in the private sector. I think there has been some sort of vague promise in the US that "anyone who wants to get one will be able without it costing an arm and a leg" but... we'll see. US is pretty shitstormy too these days so who knows... 

My wife's in the same boat - she's young, healthy, no comorbities, etc. It'll probably be Summer for her -plus our daughter is still breastfeeding so there's this added "should I?" factor. 

Hope you don't have to wait that long - who knows, maybe our governments will get their shit together!*

 

*always good to start the new year off w. a lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

×
×
  • Create New...