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What did you study in high-school/university? What did you end up doing for a living? What do you do in your leisure time? What are you plans for the future? Where did it all go wrong?


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3 hours ago, randomsummer said:

That's pretty cool, there's not a lot of rheologists out there.  They're mostly in the oilfield, plastics, and food industries.

Recently I've been trying to do some cool stuff in the area of "psychophysics".  My last project was determining the human perception limits for changes in viscosity, or thickness. Now that we know that, we know how much a product like a lotion can be off the target in thickness before people will start to notice it's different and complain.

So what's the limit? And how much more money will that make P&G or whichever multinational chem firm you're at? I'm betting in the hundreds of millions.

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it doesn't fucking matter. whatever major you choose you will end up having the job title of computer operator. you will spend day after day looking at a fucking screen where you answer emails, work o

Got a Visual Design/Communications degree after realizing being an illustrator is a very niche, very exclusive industry where you have to be very, very good to make ends meet (this was the early 90's

When I registered on WATMM I was clinically depressed, my parents were divorced and my mom (whom I was living with) was too mentally ill to bother to get me any treatment, get me to school and fix my

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6 hours ago, chenGOD said:

So what's the limit? And how much more money will that make P&G or whichever multinational chem firm you're at? I'm betting in the hundreds of millions.

It depends on the viscosity itself, we're worse at discriminating differences at very high and very low viscosity, and better at intermediate values.  It also depends on the modality, whether we're discriminating visually with our eyes, with our hands/fingers, or both at the same time.

I don't work for P&G, my company is more seen as a healthcare / pharma company and our consumer division is not as big as P&G or Unilever.  That should give you enough info to figure it out.  My attitude toward huge companies like this is a lot less than favorable, but I justify it in two ways.  1.)  A lot of my work is toward the goal of eliminating waste, which is good for everyone.  E.g., manufacturing makes a several ton batch that is out of spec, but I show it's still OK to release and they don't have to throw it away and make another.  2.)  I know that, despite what they say every day, my company doesn't give 2 shits about me and I act accordingly.  My goal is to make the most amount of money for myself and retire as early as possible, while not giving them one second of my time or effort that I'm not compensated for.

Edit:  The money it saves the company is between a few hundred thousand and a million per year.  Again, 90% of the time the savings are in eliminating waste.

Edited by randomsummer
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2 hours ago, randomsummer said:

P&G

P&G ?

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University I majored in Communications and minored in History.  For a living I became a licensed Funeral Director.  After ten years in that industry I eventually called it quits because of horrible work/life balance and job-related stress.  Now i'm just in a sales gig 9-5 Monday through Friday.  A lot of stress has indeed lifted off my shoulders, but it's all relative.  Humans will always find something to complain about-- now instead of complaining about being woken up at 3am with a death call, i'm annoyed with the numerous sales meetings and bullshit company initiatives.  

Leisure time I like to try to do things outside with my wife, hike, explore new areas, take walks.  I've become even a bigger craft beer head than I ever was at the moment, traveling hours to go to certain breweries to buy special release 4packs- that kind of shit.  Music is of course a big part of leisure, it's included in just about everything I do.  I create music sometimes but it's not a consistent thing-- only when the mood REALLY strikes me.  Working out / physical fitness has been a huge part of my life but i'm taking a break from it at the moment because of chest pains.  Other than that I love seeing friends as much as possible, i'm generally an outgoing person unless i'm hungover.  If i'm hungover stay 10 ft from me or I will bite.   

Future plans?  I don't have many.  I would love to invest so much in different things right now that I could retire earlier than normal.  I am a believer that humans shouldn't spend 80% of their week slaving away at jobs.  This world and life is too beautiful and fleeting to let it be spent entirely just making money and paying bills.  Kids may be in the future but I'm in no hurry at all, i'm barely wise enough to take care of myself at the moment let alone another tiny human being

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@randomsummer yo sorry I realize my comment could have come off as accusatory or something along those lines. It was supposed to be more tongue in cheek than it came off. 
 

@diatoms P&G is Procter and Gamble. 

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7 hours ago, chenGOD said:

@randomsummer yo sorry I realize my comment could have come off as accusatory or something along those lines. It was supposed to be more tongue in cheek than it came off. 
 

@diatoms P&G is Procter and Gamble. 

No problem!

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I'm on my third university degree right now. Geological Science > Hydrogeology (postgrad) > Counselling and Psychotherapy (postgrad). Bit of a leap on the last one.

Very tired of the earth science field and how all the jobs are pinned to the mining industry, which in Australia is full of dickheads. Still working as a geoscientist now, but it's rapidly moving into data science which is far outside my life interests. The money has been great, but it ain't the be all end all. The job and money is not satisfying at all and does not align with core values. Helping people on a personal level is a lot more meaningful, which is why I'm jumping ship.

 

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Studied law in uni. Worked as a law clerk /judicial advisor for a couple of years. Lots of thinking and writing, very cerebral stuff. I wanted to try something else so since May this year I'm working as a legal advisor meets social worker at an organization that helps refugees. I work part time now (they didn't offer a full time contract) but I love it tbf. More time for music and life and less overall stress

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P&G

Proctor & Gamble:)

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currently studying law at a university but i dont really know what i want to do with it yet.

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On 7/25/2020 at 3:35 AM, sweepstakes said:

it turned out I just really did like coding and was reasonably good at it, which wasn't surprising because I've been doing it since I was 11 (even if I stayed with QBasic WAY too long).

Yeah, same here.

At one point I took a look at my 386 pc, noticed it had a speaker and decided to program a tool for manipulating the frequency it put out using a graph where you could add, subtract and move vertices. Must’ve spent weeks and weeks on it ... in QBasic.

Much later I learned I had invented a really crude form of FM synthesis.

It sounded awful.

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22 minutes ago, rhmilo said:

Yeah, same here.

At one point I took a look at my 386 pc, noticed it had a speaker and decided to program a tool for manipulating the frequency it put out using a graph where you could add, subtract and move vertices. Must’ve spent weeks and weeks on it ... in QBasic.

Much later I learned I had invented a really crude form of FM synthesis.

It sounded awful.

I started when I was 9yo with my neighbor's Commodore 64 writing programs that endlessly printed things like "MY SISTER IS AN IDIOT". Found a practical use instantly.

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3 hours ago, zkom said:

I started when I was 9yo with my neighbor's Commodore 64 writing programs that endlessly printed things like "MY SISTER IS AN IDIOT". Found a practical use instantly.

I made a (silent) animation of a face telling "your mama" jokes. I had hand-drawn mouth and eye sprites that were controlled by a "phoneme" string.

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25 minutes ago, sweepstakes said:

I made a (silent) animation of a face telling "your mama" jokes. I had hand-drawn mouth and eye sprites that were controlled by a "phoneme" string.

I've continued the tradition for example by making an IRC bot in Clojure that just insults everybody. Basically wanted to try out the IRC library for Clojure and that was the first thing that came to mind.

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It's impressive what all one can do with knowledge of programming. Studying basics (variable scopes, memory allocation, arrays, for loops, etc) it's hard to imagine how these "building blocks" can make up complex stuff like you guys wrote above. This has been my major learning issue, to understand how messing around with numbers gets you a moving image, an interface, or anything beyond Hello World, Find array elements, or concatenate information... kudos

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24 minutes ago, cichlisuite said:

It's impressive what all one can do with knowledge of programming. Studying basics (variable scopes, memory allocation, arrays, for loops, etc) it's hard to imagine how these "building blocks" can make up complex stuff like you guys wrote above. This has been my major learning issue, to understand how messing around with numbers gets you a moving image, an interface, or anything beyond Hello World, Find array elements, or concatenate information... kudos

Well, back in my day, after I got my own Commodore 64 I started to dabble with the 6502 CPU's machine language. Data structures and memory allocations, pfft. 6502 is a very simple processor. Every command takes exactly 1 cycle so with the 1MHz speed you get ~1 million operations per second, depending if your PAL or NTSC. And the operations are very simple, like addition to an 8-bit integer accumulator. It doesn't even support multiplication of two integers let alone something like division or floating point numbers. Now then, imagine that software like flight simulators and desktop publishing software were written on this thing and they also had to fit in the 64 kilobytes of RAM.

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1 hour ago, cichlisuite said:

It's impressive what all one can do with knowledge of programming. Studying basics (variable scopes, memory allocation, arrays, for loops, etc) it's hard to imagine how these "building blocks" can make up complex stuff like you guys wrote above. This has been my major learning issue, to understand how messing around with numbers gets you a moving image, an interface, or anything beyond Hello World, Find array elements, or concatenate information... kudos

"Divide and conquer" as they say.

For my animation example, we want to make a face say stuff. OK. How do we do that?
- Animation is just a series of frames (still pictures). So we need to update it every X milliseconds. Easy enough - we have a loop that waits that long to update, does the next thing and then it's done. Simple enough.
- How do we put the picture in? Depends on the language/framework/stack, but it usually just involves loading an image into memory and plopping it in place. Find the coordinates of the mouth and eyes and plop them there.
- How do we decide which frame to display? Well, this is probably the trickiest part, but in my case it was just a matter of tinkering. Which frame looks like which consonant/vowel? Pick that one.
- How do we express which frame to display? I used a string (i.e. a contiguous "array" of characters) as my "frame sequencer". Strings are cheap and there are good constructs or manipulating them in most environments. All we have to do is count up (i.e. increment an integer by 1) and read that character  until we run out of string, i.e the animation is done.

In my opinion/experience, this process of breaking things down, through imagining/planning or experimenting/tinkering, is the essence of programming. Everything else is the problem space, domain-specific knowledge, and/or accidental complexity (i.e. dealing with bullshit).

Also, keep it simple, skip memory allocation as much as you can for now :)

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Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics, took on a PhD in Solar Physics afterwards before realizing none of it mattered because I couldn’t see myself dedicating 40+ years to essentially being a student.  So I left it all behind and sought out a new career, primarily something like accountancy.
 

Now I’m a part qualified actuary working for a large US insurance firm and have been for almost 4 years now.  Should’ve made the change sooner tbh.  

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On 7/25/2020 at 7:14 AM, chim said:

When I registered on WATMM I was clinically depressed, my parents were divorced and my mom (whom I was living with) was too mentally ill to bother to get me any treatment, get me to school and fix my grades. I moved out at 18 without graduating high school and worked odd telemarketing jobs between living on welfare until I got a temp job in elderly care. I eventually switched to the handicap care sector, wasted 1.5 years on a care worker license that my municipality doesn't recognize, so I'm still classified as an unqualified worker. But as I've worked a few years I've increased my salary to a respectable amount, and all the weird hours add up. So here I am, wasting my money on synths and my free time on music, posting on forums & hanging with buddies, trying to make the best out of a bad situation. I can barely remember the depressed years in my twenties since they were so devoid of life, so I'm not sure I learned anything. But I'm in the happiest years of my life now, with a wonderful fiance who loves me more than anybody's ever done and supports everything I do, and I'm grateful for every day of life and that I didn't kill myself when I had the urge several years ago. My plan for the future is to keep being happy, healthy, invest my savings in my index fund and make an ok pension 30 years from now.

i work in a psychiatric ward in stockholm where i have two caretaker colleagues in their 30s-40s who look like they could be browsing watmm

happy to hear you're doing better

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37 minutes ago, sweepstakes said:

"Divide and conquer" as they say.

- How do we express which frame to display? I used a string (i.e. a contiguous "array" of characters) as my "frame sequencer". Strings are cheap and there are good constructs or manipulating them in most environments. All we have to do is count up (i.e. increment an integer by 1) and read that character  until we run out of string, i.e the animation is done.

 

Also, keep it simple, skip memory allocation as much as you can for now 🙂

All right, interesting, so each frame is represented by a string. So far I've seen that such stuff is expressed with integers because it is easier to make arithmetic with them, but I guess that depends on the problem at hand.

Divide and conquer, sure, but I guess first I need to understand how computer deals with information and how each different programming language expresses instructions, so I am able to break down problems into steps and make abstract "roadmaps" on a sheet of paper (e.g. prototyping). I guess.... That's why i had to go deep with that stuff...understanding memory and binary is only part of it... I'm not even at cycles yet...

For instance one thing I got out from "reverse-engineering" (that only sounds like I know what I'm doing, but so far, I can only read some code and see how stuff is made... to an extent) if I want to make like an object that is controlled by user and that object interacts with other objects, the object must at all times check its position on coordinates and its surroundings for another object in the same coordinate system, and then you need an algorithm to check where those objects are in relation to each other... and only then you can calculate any interactions....etc...

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9 hours ago, thumbass said:

currently studying law at a university but i dont really know what i want to do with it yet.

ive always wanted to be a lawyer but that ambition has kind of faded away over the pas year... 

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54 minutes ago, cichlisuite said:

I guess that depends on the problem at hand.

Totally! And limitations.

54 minutes ago, cichlisuite said:

how each different programming language expresses instructions

Yep, that's the bullshit I was talking about, hehe. Learn one thing that seems cool/enjoyable first, and get some kind of mastery with it. You'll know you're getting somewhere when you can think in terms of its constructs.

56 minutes ago, cichlisuite said:

"reverse-engineering"

It sounds like you are on the right track... when you try to implement this type of thing yourself you start to see how it all fits together and the advantages/drawbacks of the various approaches. You'll get an idea of the limitations of the system, your own weaknesses, etc. From there it's stones in the river, you optimize different components for different concerns with more and more educated guesses.

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high school - can't remember my exact ambition level back then, but it was no doubt pretty low. started smoking pot around 9th grade, quit playing football and instead played in bands, and by senior year was hanging with the deadhead/phish stoner crew smoking 4-5 times/day, mixing it up with the 2PAC aggro pantera dudes from time to time. I never studied and made mostly C's, with a few D's & B's thrown in.

college - no clue what major I wanted to go into when I started, was undeclared until end of freshman year when I decided psychology seemed like a decent fit. stumbled my way through college more or less same as high school - lot of partying, girlfriends, and barely getting by grade wise. I think it was junior year when I came to the realization that in order to do anything lucrative in the world of psychology, you really need a PhD. took a course in Industrial/Organizational (I/O) psychology and liked the idea that it mixed psychology principles in the business world. that and you could find a job with a master's (more on that later). senior year was a disaster grade wise and I was more interested in a girlfriend back then, but I somehow ended up scoring OK on the GRE, and had become friends with a psych prof. that wrote me an excellent recommendation letter. applied to a few grad schools, 1 accepted me, so I jumped on that.

grad school - I/O psychology master's program. after making the adjustment from high school to college, I now had to do it again. but I'm a grad student now and supposed to be more mature... mostly hung out with the clinical psych grad students (many who had psychological issues of their own, but are now counselling/teaching others). grad school was a weird time. lived in a rough area next door to some legit schizophrenics who thankfully looked at me like I was superman since I was in grad school for psychology. made for some interesting discussions... I studied more though at this point, and was probably at the pinnacle of my intelligence level during those years (anyone who's been through a grad program knows you have to read a SHIT LOAD of textbooks & journal articles and write a ton of papers = a lot of critical, deeper level thinking). still, I managed to eek by with bare minimum effort toward a lot of it. I was so ready to be done with school by this point and wanted out. barely made it out of there with an M.A. and then took some time off after that to travel around a bit and ended up moving back home with my parents.

jobs - one thing about my grad school experience is that I don't feel that it was very useful in a real world endeavor, like finding a job. grad school professors can get lost in their own little world of publish or perish, without realizing this is THEIR world that not all of us are going to be in forever. and most of the time, other grad students look at them like they're gods in this little world and therefore must know everything... needless to say, looking for a job in the field I chose sucked. it is a very niche field and in order to go into full blown consulting, you need a PhD. I ended up working a bunch of shitty jobs I was overqualified for, which completely bummed me out. went into a bukowski drinking phase in my mid 20's but somehow never got fired from a job. I quit a few without anything lined up, which everyone knows is rule #1 you do not do unless you want to go further down the drink/depression rabbit hole. finally landed on my current gig which is OK, mix of a corporate job with a bit of blue collar thrown in, and almost 100% WFH. it is not in the field I went to grad school for, which I gave up on a long long time ago... one of the schizo's I lived next to once said "a man's education should not be a means to his vocation," which funnily enough came true for me.

so for me, I look at"what went wrong" as "when did it ever go right." I feel like I just landed in my current spot in life without a lot of foresight or planning, and envy those who early on decided upon engineering, a hard science, or anything else they felt a pull toward (you've REALLY got to want to be a medical doctor to go through all that). but I'm ok I guess. have a job, house, and family so can't complain. 

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3 hours ago, sweepstakes said:

Learn one thing that seems cool/enjoyable first, and get some kind of mastery with it. You'll know you're getting somewhere when you can think in terms of its constructs.

It sounds like you are on the right track... when you try to implement this type of thing yourself you start to see how it all fits together and the advantages/drawbacks of the various approaches. You'll get an idea of the limitations of the system, your own weaknesses, etc. From there it's stones in the river, you optimize different components for different concerns with more and more educated guesses.

Thanks for encouragement. It's a long and steep way uphill 🙂

If you remember from our short PM exchange a while ago, I've come some way ahead, but I'd have gone even further if I was more consistent and disciplined heh heh

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