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mgore10

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About mgore10

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  1. You can build sequencers right in Max to control time/events firing off samplers, synths, effects, that you can also make right in Max. Max also hosts VST and Audio Unit plugins - this way they can be treated like a modular building block just like other 'objects' in Max. Gen~ is a way to do optimized digital signal processing in Max that work at a single sample level and that do not need to be compiled in C. I guess the best way to think about Max is as a huge modular machine where almost anything can be patched into anything. The beauty is its ability to finely control sounds and trigger them however you want - randomly, through probabilities, external data, conditional statements (ex. if X happens then do Z), etc. - whatever you can think up, you can do - (ex. I want this rhythmic and pitch structure to interpolate/modulate seamlessly to this new structure over the next 30 seconds). Hope this helps :)
  2. yeah, way too much bass last night at the Orlando show. also, levels were consistently exceeding 100 dB according to my friends sound meter... glad I wore ear plugs.
  3. 1 no i haven't, i didn't know they got acoustic setup there. ok cool, 2 i never used SC. no good at coding really. Yeah, U of Manchester has some very nice studio facilities for 8 channel composition work, in addition to their massive speaker setups for concerts. Here's a picture of the concert hall set up with 48 Genelecs: http://www.novars.manchester.ac.uk/mantis/overview/ If you are into electroacoustic composers like Parmegiani, then these concerts are definitely worth checking out.
  4. a couple of questions that were missed earlier (no problem): 1. Have you ever checked out some of the electroacoustic/acousmatic concerts at the University of Manchester with their 24+ channel "MANTIS" sound system? They do some pretty amazing things with aural images and spatial counterpoint. The music coming out of there is quite gestural, but still really taps into cross-modal perception in a meaningful way, if one's listening skills and attention span are up for it. Some "academic" composers that are doing some really interesting DSP - Natasha Barrett (although she is from Norway), David Berezan (professor at U Manchester), Manuella Blackburn. 2. Either of you have any interest in Supercollider anymore, or does Smalltalk code do your head it too much? I love Max to death, but often feel deflated when some algorithmic process takes an extraordinary amount of patching in Max, but is only several lines of code in Supercollider.
  5. Either of you have any interest in Supercollider anymore, or does Smalltalk code do you head it too much? I love Max to death, but often feel deflated when some algorithmic process takes an extraordinary amount of patching in Max, but is only several lines of code in Supercollider.
  6. Have you ever checked out some of the electroacoustic/acousmatic concerts at the University of Manchester with their 24+ channel "MANTIS" sound system? They do some pretty amazing things with aural images and spatial counterpoint. The music coming out of there is quite gestural, but still really taps into cross-modal perception in a meaningful way, if one's listening skills and attention span are up for it.
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