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caze

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caze last won the day on June 9 2020

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  1. I've not read it, but should probably noted that most academic evolution and anthropology people seem to have a pretty poor view of this book (they also recommend avoiding that Rutger Bregman guy too).
  2. I never mentioned 'worth', you're still just making a bunch of dumb assumptions about moral judgements I haven't made. Civilization is defined around specific technological and social development (specifically including a writing system), it's just an objective measure of what has or hasn't occurred around that, the value of other aspects of their society, and their relative moral worth is a totally separate argument. Just because some people in the past made shitty moral judgements based around 'civilized people and barbarians' doesn't mean we have to today, we can recognise obvious historical facts without engaging in needless moralising. All human societies were at one time hunter gatherers, there's nothing reductive or lazy about it, it's what we all did at one point before we figured out different ways of doing things. It simply describes what people spent a large part of their time doing, and doesn't discount all the other things they did, if it did the people who study these societies would have run out of stuff to do a long time ago - they have no problem referring to them as hunter gatherers and also documenting the complexity of their rituals and so on.
  3. They were also living at the whims of nature, and when crops failed and natural disasters occurred, the resulting stresses generally led to the genocidal warfare (again, like with any other society of a similar level of development - and what we'd return to if the eco-fascists and degrowthers got their way). Also, once they got a hold of some horses and guns their rep as living in harmony with nature took a serious beating, look what happened to all the buffalo. ...and were preyed upon by the ones who didn't. Same as it ever was. The only reason I'm talking about it at all was to disabuse you of the noble savage notions you seem to have. I also called the Europeans genocidal, to suggest I think they deserved it is absurd. There were a mix of hunter gatherers, nomadic warring tribes, and at times more settled agricultural systems (though nothing in North America that was very long lasting or left much of a permanent record). There was no large scale continent-wide agriculture based civilisation (just a few regional proto-civs that never fully got going, though they undoubtedly would have given the time). Things were a lot more developed in central/south America, where they also developed writing/astronomy/maths. No, you're just making a lot of dumb assumptions. Doubtful, unless they're big proponents of nuclear power and genetic engineering or something. I am a big fan of the anti-NIMBY guys in Vancouver though, more of this kind of thing would be great.
  4. You might be surprised to learn that people today are not the same as the people of the past, the descendants of the genocidal European colonists are no longer genocidal assholes either, people in general have got less genocidal. The native populations of the Americas practiced widescale human sacrifice, cannibalism, slavery, large scale genocidal warfare, etc (just like every other pre/proto-civilizational society on the planet). The only reason they mostly got wiped out rather than the other way around is the Europeans discovered big boats and guns first.
  5. I mean the native population of the Americas were royally fucked by the Europeans, but lets not engage in some silly noble savage bullshit. They were just as murderous and genocidal a bunch of assholes as any other people on the planet sadly.
  6. I was mostly scrolling through twitter while watching it, real snoozefest, atrocious. Not sure why I bothered. The fight scenes with Vader really highlighted how childish and dumb this shit was and still is, should've left all the old stuff in the past, tried to do something new (well, they did try that too in the recent movies, and that also failed - bar maybe Rogue One, so maybe they should just stop trying altogether).
  7. caze

    Dune

    First half of the first book, up to the bit when they arrive at Sietch Tabr or thereabouts. TV series not based on anything afaik, unless it's from his son's awful books (he did a few prequels I think). It's gonna be a Bene Gesserit focused prequel thing.
  8. Yes, this exactly. Even some of the big NASA funded missions which are still going ahead, like Artemis, are only doing so because of politics (congresspeople ensuring money earmarked for their state stays there - I think all 50 states have a hand in the Artemis pie in some way or another). Artemis is going to cost 10x what SpaceX could do by themselves, NASA did try to cut some costs a bit by choosing SpaceX only for the moon lander, but now this decision is in review because of the aforementioned congress-graft. There's also an element of use-it-or-lose-it, NASA needs to demand money for these big projects to ensure it keeps getting funding for other things it thinks are more important, like space astronomy and interplanetary probes for doing basic space science, when cuts are needed they can take them from the bigger project - (which they did with cancelling the Mars aspect of Artemis - probably for the best, doing that in addition to the Moon with all the same technology would have been a colossal waste of money). This will hopefully become a moot point in the future if these commercial developments pay off, NASA will start requiring a much smaller budget (it's already relatively small in the grand scheme of things, but still). Signs are pretty good they will pay off though.
  9. The space tourism thing with them is more of a side-project, they can use it to fund development of their main operations - which will be sub-orbital supersonic passenger flights, and flexible small satellite launches - which they can launch from pretty much anywhere by flying their converted 747 launch vehicle around, containing all required ground operations equipment, making satellite launching accessible to a lot more nations for much much cheaper (It's limited to low-earth orbit for the time being though, they've had one successful launch so far, back in January, not something which is going to be fully competing with SpaceX or other rocket based things any time soon).
  10. caze

    UFO'S

    no, just the usual completely unproven nonsense which violates the laws of physics.
  11. caze

    UFO'S

    why would anyone give a shit? they're just planes and balloons and shit.
  12. Almost Nothing You’ve Heard About Evictions in Jerusalem Is True - WSJ
  13. Bombings have nothing to do with what I'm talking about. Neither side is justified in their current bombing campaigns (though it was Hamas who started this current round, as usual, so the ultimate responsibility lies with them). Do you think it's reasonable for Hamas to bomb Israeli children? At least one has died so far. Also, how many of the Palestinian dead are from Hamas rockets which land in Gaza? At least one incident involving multiple deaths, including children, came from one of their rockets. Around 20% of them land in Gaza.
  14. nobody has been forcibly removed as of yet afaik, the supreme court hasn't reached a judgement. from the 1870s or thereabouts. they never stopped owning it, but they were kicked off the land by the Jordanians in 1948, the area was then taken by Israel in '67 war. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamization_of_East_Jerusalem_under_Jordanian_rule “During Jordanian rule, 34 out of the Old City’s 35 synagogues were dynamited.” [8] The Western Wall was transformed into an exclusively Muslim holy site associated with al-Buraq.[9] 38,000 Jewish graves in the ancient Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives were systematically destroyed (used as pavement and latrines),[10][11] and Jews were not allowed to be buried there.[5][6] This was all in violation of the Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement Article VIII - 2 "...; free access to the Holy Places and cultural institutions and use of the cemetery on the Mount of Olives;...."[12] Following the Arab Legion's expulsion of the Jewish residents of the Old City in the 1948 War, Jordan allowed Arab Muslim refugees to settle in the vacated Jewish Quarter.[13] Later, after some of these refugees were moved to Shuafat, migrants from Hebron took their place.[14] Abdullah el Tell, a commander of the Arab Legion, remarked:
  15. ...note that I'm just talking about this specific case here, not Israeli settlements in the West Bank in general, which are frequently unjust (IIRC only a minority represent what you might consider normal legal transfers of property, with outright theft and coercion a common tactic in many cases).
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