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So I'm very surprised that this is still apparently going ahead... I'm supposed to be at Dublin airport now to head over to rave with some Detroit pals. We all cancelled in the face of this pandemic. Lets see if or how many acts pull out... this should have been postponed at least.

 

Anyone going? Cancelled? Bemused?

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Cheltenham horse racing festival is still full steam ahead... probably 50% Irish there today.

Bangface is definitely full steam ahead - I guess if James pulled the plug he would foot the bill (not sure what Pontin's cancellation policy is, but probably lands with the promoter)

Anyway... good luck to anyone that makes it through to Sunday evening for the pusher!

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I'm messaged James about it.. I guess he's relying on government directives plus the £££'s of course

 

But there is also, you know. a health dose of  .. doing the right thing!

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I read some instagram posts from friends on site, its bangface but everyone seems a little more chilled (lol)

People are washing their hands more often.  Hope they dont run out of toilet rolls.

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I heard Ray Keith & Benny L filled in for Tom... not really my taste. Ray Keith made loads bangers but I reckon a modern set would be disappointing for me.

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4 hours ago, Richie Sombrero said:

Disgusting this went ahead. I'll never support them after this. Fair play to artists who withdrew. 

They were apparently deleting comments regarding health concerns. I'm definitely never going to anything organised by them.

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8 hours ago, Richie Sombrero said:

Disgusting this went ahead. I'll never support them after this. Fair play to artists who withdrew. 

 

3 hours ago, oscillik said:

They were apparently deleting comments regarding health concerns. I'm definitely never going to anything organised by them.

+1

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Schools are still open here, there was no government advice in place for it not to go ahead when it started on Thursday. They only just closed the London theatres this evening, advisory not law.... 

If you make the personal decision to attend an event like this then hopefully you make the sensible decision of self isolating for 2 weeks when you get home. Many didn't go, photos I saw showed a much less packed dancefloor than events I've been too. 

Appreciate your thoughts on this going ahead though, a tough call. If it was this weekend I am sure it wouldn't be on.

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4 hours ago, oscillik said:

They were apparently deleting comments regarding health concerns. I'm definitely never going to anything organised by them.

Pretty shitty if true

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that is messed up, ugh

More then half of the people there are on drugs that shut down their immune system, one corona carrier and it's a massacre

the fuck is wrong with you brits

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13 hours ago, Soloman Tump said:

advisory not law...

With you being in the UK, I'm sure you're probably of the same sentiment as me which is — they're doing too little, too late.

By advising, instead of mandating, they're leaving the decision up to individuals whether they choose between staying at home and losing money/not being able to pay bills, and they're leaving the decision to business owners and organisations...most places will choose money over people's health, and it's pretty blatant.

My workplace, a major law enforcement organisation, still has us coming into work despite us being civillian staff, and the building we're in doesn't have hot water…so we can't even wash our hands properly.

The whole thing would be a farce if it weren't so deadly.

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16 minutes ago, oscillik said:

By advising, instead of mandating, they're leaving the decision up to individuals whether they choose between staying at home and losing money/not being able to pay bills, and they're leaving the decision to business owners and organisations...most places will choose money over people's health, and it's pretty blatant.

This is a major issue in the U.S. as well.

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6 minutes ago, Taupe Beats said:

This is a major issue in the U.S. as well.

Yep. It's pretty clear that corporate needs are being put above public health, for both our nations.

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In Ireland theres a MASSIVE feeling of solidarity and coherence through community, government, messaging and spirit

Utter dismay at how far behind UK is.. i was skyping with friends and cousins in UK over the weekend. ...2 weeks behind everyone, confused messages and a pretty unclear idea of whats coming down the line - ie MASSIVE numbers of sickness and death.

LBC radio too..... seems dated to me right now

 

 

 

 

 

 

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'The last dance: clubbing in the coronavirus crisis'

'With nightclubs such as Fabric and Ministry of Sound closing their doors because of coronavirus, the Bang Face festival was the last chance for Britons to rave for some time'

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/17/the-last-dance-clubbing-in-the-coronavirus-crisis

Gabriel Szatan

Tue 17 Mar 2020 09.29 GMT Last modified on Wed 18 Mar 2020 10.54 GMT

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"Bang Face, a dance music festival held at Southport holiday park Pontins, is known for a particularly hell-for-leather approach to jackhammering dance music, gallows humour and airborne inflatables. Held over the weekend before Downing Street decided to advise against all gatherings of this kind, it will likely be the last major dance music event in the UK for some time. Nightclubs including London’s Fabric and Ministry of Sound announced its temporary closure yesterday, and festivals such as Re-Textured have been cancelled.

Jokes circulated in the run-up to Bang Face about the irony that rave duo Altern-8, the weekender’s de facto house band, are not only known for wearing boilersuits and face masks, but would be playing mostly hits from their 1992 album Full On … Mask Hysteria, casting them as unlikely oracles. The festival was set to be something of a pre-apocalyptic knees-up.

But eyes were on the outcome of Thursday’s Cobra meeting and a ruling on the status of mass gatherings. The UK opted to keep calm and carry on, so Bang Face went ahead, with strains of full-strength bassline and donk kicking off just two hours after Boris Johnson’s press conference finished. That evening, Glastonbury announced its 2020 lineup. Rock and dance gigs up and down the country, ranging from club basements to sporting arenas, were due to plough ahead – and did.

Over the weekend, the situation evolved at pace. Europe began a self-enforced shutdown. The UK government hinted at a U-turn in the days ahead. Managers scrambled to get their artists home from DJ tours before borders were locked down. Bang Face reacted on the ground: surplus hand washing stations were set up, staff wore gloves and stocked free soap by the tills, and the in-house TV station was used to display cancellation messages. Some artists were unable to travel, some stayed away of their own volition.

As the urgency of social distancing took hold, the tenor of online conversations in music circles darkened: if an industry as typically bloated as football could unilaterally hit the pause button, shouldn’t live music? The nature of having fun to thunderously loud acid techno felt increasingly like being a scab crossing the picket line.

Bang Face organisers have defended their decision to let the show go on, with the same reasoning other venues and touring artists facing flak have used: the government said it was OK. A statement from the festival’s management reads: “We took the decision to go ahead with the event in line with government guidelines and have been closely monitoring the situation while taking professional advice to ensure safety and minimise impact on local services.”

They were left with an unenviable decision to mitigate in real time. Do you risk asymptomatic people spreading the virus? Do you send workers home, from performing artists to lighting technicians to security to bar staff, who might desperately rely on that last paycheck before work in events is vaporised? With insurance policies unclear on cancellation policy due to Covid-19, and no emergency fund from the government in place for nightlife industries, a string of bankruptcies are a very real possibility, too – although this was looked upon dimly by European counterparts who enacted compulsory closure much sooner.

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This nightmare scenario has played out for innumerable people in the music business over the past few days. Ash Lauryn, an Atlanta-based, Detroit-rooted promoter and radio host, was caught in limbo at the outset of an extensive European tour. “When I left the US on 11 March, all of my gigs in Europe were still scheduled to move forward,” the DJ said. “Within 24 hours of arriving in Berlin, cancellations started to come in. By the end of the week, everything on my Europe tour was cancelled, including some additional US gigs scheduled in April.” She felt sombre, if not shortchanged: “I know I’m not alone in this. That helps.”

Karl Fuller is a programmer at Tottenham venue Five Miles, who are today calling off all events for the foreseeable future. He says that Five Miles will be unable to survive financially for more than a few weekends with doors shut – and that his job, and those of his colleagues, is inevitably on the line. He has been encouraged by an unforeseen spike in resource pooling and solidarity among competitors in London’s club scene. “The electronic music community is a beautiful thing when it wants to be,” Fuller says. “It really gets behind causes, such as the license threat recently posed to [Canning Town nightclub] Fold. I’m hopeful that all of us in smaller, independent entities that don’t have the backing or infrastructure in place for a situation such as this are appreciated, and people come out in support when our backs are really against the wall.” Although, he added, “it is a very complicated situation that no one has any concrete answers for.”

Public support is one thing, but when the UK government gives the all-clear to run events of a certain size again, will ticket sales resume? Will there have been sufficient business relief that any venues will even exist to do so? The opacity of Johnson’s follow-up statement on Monday evening, which did not give an order for venues to close but asked the public to take the initiative to stay away, added further confusion.

For all the hopeful talk about models of interdependency, the coronavirus crisis has exposed the precariousness of a model that relies heavily on people getting together for a good time, and the lack of a safety net for the vast majority who work in it. The events industry, and music at large, has entered a liminal state in which no one knows when things will return to normal – or if they will at all."

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/17/the-last-dance-clubbing-in-the-coronavirus-crisis

 

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