Jump to content

Max/MSP


Adieu
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

Here's a video I did a while back using Max/Jitter + my webcam. DIfferent parts of the video respond to different instruments + some live knob tweaking.

 

[youtubehd]0X8LkoeqSH4[/youtubehd]

 

that is beautiful...

 

+1!

 

i love how it's very simple yet always evolving.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can't do it with just pd (not sure of the scope of the thing) you can no doubt do it with vvvv (vvvv.org) either with or without the help of pd

 

yeah i've been wanting to learn vvvv too... so well I think it's time :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

version 7 looks promising but i need to upgrade both of my comp's OS even to try it lol. i'm still on win xp and snow leopard :facepalm

I'm a little confused about this. I'm on Snow Leopard too but I'm running Max 6 just fine and it looks like it has the same OS requirements as 7.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Here's a video I did a while back using Max/Jitter + my webcam. DIfferent parts of the video respond to different instruments + some live knob tweaking.

 

[youtubehd]0X8LkoeqSH4[/youtubehd]

 

that is beautiful...

 

+1!

 

i love how it's very simple yet always evolving.

 

 

 

Thanks guys, glad you enjoy. This was made by just letting a few max patches do their thing + some knob tweakage like I mentioned above while I moved my webcam around the studio, letting the track play.

 

Things you can see in the video if you pay attention: Edirol FA-66, Korg PadKontrol, DSI Tetra, BCR-2000, marijuana pipe, my face

 

Sadly my storage drive recently died and I hadn't back up in a while, so I lost many of my recent Max experiments and all of my sample library from the last 10+ years... Now I'm just getting back going after doing a fresh re-install of Windows and getting everything set back up.

 

I've decided to look at this whole incident is a good thing tho, it will force me to change things up a bit which I feel is needed at this point.

Edited by hautlle
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

version 7 looks promising but i need to upgrade both of my comp's OS even to try it lol. i'm still on win xp and snow leopard :facepalm

I'm a little confused about this. I'm on Snow Leopard too but I'm running Max 6 just fine and it looks like it has the same OS requirements as 7.

 

motherfucker! seems like xp is no longer supported: https://cycling74.com/downloads/sys-reqs/

 

don't know about mac os names, it says 10.7+

 

anybody tried installing on win xp??? or i'll finally get me a new compy for xmas...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

anybody tried installing on win xp??? or i'll finally get me a new compy for xmas...

You can get the max7 30 day demo on their site - give it a damn good go and find out (and maybe think of updating yer 13 year old OS ;) )
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

anybody tried installing on win xp??? or i'll finally get me a new compy for xmas...

You can get the max7 30 day demo on their site - give it a damn good go and find out (and maybe think of updating yer 13 year old OS ;) )

 

maybe i should give a slightly more juvenile os a try. but i'm afraid of change... :unsure:

 

anyway, my still almost brand new analog rytm is constantly keeping me away from the box. time to do some patching! :cisfor:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

before i upgrade to yosemite and win7 i need to change hdd to flash on my mbp first, then install all the apps and everything aaaahhh and on my pc i need to back up all the files, sort everything, maybe even upgrade some hw...lots of work, lots of money... i'll stick with the v6 for now. it's a bug fest on cycling74 forum. i suppose i'll wait until v7.1.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

maybe i should give a slightly more juvenile os a try. but i'm afraid of change... :unsure:

Windows 8 + Classic Shell (http://www.classicshell.net/ ) set to 'XP mode' and you'll be grand :biggrin:

 

thx for the tip. in fact, i have turned off every single visual effect in any of my computers since win98! i'm not sure this is old school enough though...

 

oh yeah and thinking about backups, setups, data transfers is giving me headaches already. the horrah th horror...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thx for the tip. in fact, i have turned off every single visual effect in any of my computers since win98! i'm not sure this is old school enough though...

Nah I hear you man, complete luddite when it comes to GUI changes myself. But check it out, this is what Windows 8.1 looks like on my machine with that installed:

 

desktop2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lush. at first i thought that was cool edit there :dadjoke:

 

will def give that a try when i got a new comp! prob gonna give one to myself for xmas.

 

can't really be arsed to update my current laptop (a dell from 2009, 2gb ram, lol!). all that driver business. nah.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lush. at first i thought that was cool edit there :dadjoke:

It's CoolEdit in all but name (Adobe Audition 1.5 is the last version when Adobe pretty much just bought the source and slapped their name on it - IMO it's still the best audio editor out there, and the last unbloated decent version)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

Following a few little max discussions i've seen around here, i thought this thread could use a little revive.

 

I've been plugging away at max for about a year now, and having done all the built in tutorials and many of the online ones (baz, delicious and a few others), as well as just spending as much time in the program as possible, I feel like i'm definitely competent with it.

 

Problem is, while i think i've hit the point where i can dissect a lot of patches and understand what's going on and also learn from them, when it comes to making my own patches from scratch, they tend to just fall flat, maybe make a couple of cool noises, but in no way utilise the power of max.

 

So any tips on pushing past this boundary and making more diverse, interesting patches?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Following a few little max discussions i've seen around here, i thought this thread could use a little revive.

 

I've been plugging away at max for about a year now, and having done all the built in tutorials and many of the online ones (baz, delicious and a few others), as well as just spending as much time in the program as possible, I feel like i'm definitely competent with it.

 

Problem is, while i think i've hit the point where i can dissect a lot of patches and understand what's going on and also learn from them, when it comes to making my own patches from scratch, they tend to just fall flat, maybe make a couple of cool noises, but in no way utilise the power of max.

 

So any tips on pushing past this boundary and making more diverse, interesting patches?

 

This is the biggest weakness with the max tutorials is that they give you the basics on how the lower stuff works and how to build the more common modules but don't actually explain why it works so you can't build upon that learning experience to create new things. It's kind of like "discovery math" that is taught in schools.

 

In Max and PD, after I did the easier tutorials, I started by just ripping out stuff from the examples and making "Frakensteins", severing parts from different modules and stitiching the chunks together different to make something different. This is completely kosher and about 90% of Max users probably do this regularly. Then I'd be changing the order that things would flow or patching things from one chunk of code of a module to an entirely different module. It's kind of like hacking hardware. Then after about 30 versions the thing looks entirely different. I was not able to make anything from nothing until I learned algebra I and II, precalculus and physics in relation to DSP theory. Music in the object oriented languages is applied physics and to make anything really interesting and new you will have to have an understanding in those areas, in terms of both equations and techniques. Unfortunately that will mean you will have to go through a long learning period but the payoff is spectacular if you truly love doing it.

 

 

Also nthing love for Cool Edit Pro/Adobe Audition 1.5. Still using it 15 years+ and is the software I would choose if I were only allowed to use one program.

Edited by Entorwellian
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Following a few little max discussions i've seen around here, i thought this thread could use a little revive.

 

I've been plugging away at max for about a year now, and having done all the built in tutorials and many of the online ones (baz, delicious and a few others), as well as just spending as much time in the program as possible, I feel like i'm definitely competent with it.

 

Problem is, while i think i've hit the point where i can dissect a lot of patches and understand what's going on and also learn from them, when it comes to making my own patches from scratch, they tend to just fall flat, maybe make a couple of cool noises, but in no way utilise the power of max.

 

So any tips on pushing past this boundary and making more diverse, interesting patches?

 

This is the biggest weakness with the max tutorials is that they give you the basics on how the lower stuff works and how to build the more common modules but don't actually explain why it works so you can't build upon that learning experience to create new things. It's kind of like "discovery math" that is taught in schools.

 

In Max and PD, after I did the easier tutorials, I started by just ripping out stuff from the examples and making "Frakensteins", severing parts from different modules and stitiching the chunks together different to make something different. This is completely kosher and about 90% of Max users probably do this regularly. Then I'd be changing the order that things would flow or patching things from one chunk of code of a module to an entirely different module. It's kind of like hacking hardware. Then after about 30 versions the thing looks entirely different. I was not able to make anything from nothing until I learned algebra I and II, precalculus and physics in relation to DSP theory. Music in the object oriented languages is applied physics and to make anything really interesting and new you will have to have an understanding in those areas, in terms of both equations and techniques. Unfortunately that will mean you will have to go through a long learning period but the payoff is spectacular if you truly love doing it.

 

 

Also nthing love for Cool Edit Pro/Adobe Audition 1.5. Still using it 15 years+ and is the software I would choose if I were only allowed to use one program.

 

 

Cheers for the insight. Wrt the "frankensteins" i guess that's what i have been doing. To be honest i think i just need to spend as much time with the program as possible, as with learning anything really.

 

Conveniently enough, i'm actually a physics student, so probably in a decent position to gain some understanding in applying the topics you mentioned in max. But thats the problem really i'm not sure where i would apply more complex mathematics/physics. You got any reading/video suggestions for implementing those topics in max?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Following a few little max discussions i've seen around here, i thought this thread could use a little revive.

 

I've been plugging away at max for about a year now, and having done all the built in tutorials and many of the online ones (baz, delicious and a few others), as well as just spending as much time in the program as possible, I feel like i'm definitely competent with it.

 

Problem is, while i think i've hit the point where i can dissect a lot of patches and understand what's going on and also learn from them, when it comes to making my own patches from scratch, they tend to just fall flat, maybe make a couple of cool noises, but in no way utilise the power of max.

 

So any tips on pushing past this boundary and making more diverse, interesting patches?

 

This is the biggest weakness with the max tutorials is that they give you the basics on how the lower stuff works and how to build the more common modules but don't actually explain why it works so you can't build upon that learning experience to create new things. It's kind of like "discovery math" that is taught in schools.

 

In Max and PD, after I did the easier tutorials, I started by just ripping out stuff from the examples and making "Frakensteins", severing parts from different modules and stitiching the chunks together different to make something different. This is completely kosher and about 90% of Max users probably do this regularly. Then I'd be changing the order that things would flow or patching things from one chunk of code of a module to an entirely different module. It's kind of like hacking hardware. Then after about 30 versions the thing looks entirely different. I was not able to make anything from nothing until I learned algebra I and II, precalculus and physics in relation to DSP theory. Music in the object oriented languages is applied physics and to make anything really interesting and new you will have to have an understanding in those areas, in terms of both equations and techniques. Unfortunately that will mean you will have to go through a long learning period but the payoff is spectacular if you truly love doing it.

 

 

Also nthing love for Cool Edit Pro/Adobe Audition 1.5. Still using it 15 years+ and is the software I would choose if I were only allowed to use one program.

 

 

Cheers for the insight. Wrt the "frankensteins" i guess that's what i have been doing. To be honest i think i just need to spend as much time with the program as possible, as with learning anything really.

 

Conveniently enough, i'm actually a physics student, so probably in a decent position to gain some understanding in applying the topics you mentioned in max. But thats the problem really i'm not sure where i would apply more complex mathematics/physics. You got any reading/video suggestions for implementing those topics in max?

 

http://www.musimathics.com/

 

These two books. Buy them, download them or steal them. These are the *best* books I have read on teaching the subject to someone who is a layman. It's trig and algebra heavy but they have appendixes at the back to give you a refresher on everything and it goes through Physics 101 in relation to music. It translates the differential calculus parts into (long) algebra so you don't have to go beyond Algebra II. You can throw in the equations and constants that are in the books and put them into Max. One third of the first volume is dedicated to algorithmic and generative music composition.

 

Secondly, there is also Miller Puckette's Theory of Electronic Music, but its a very difficult read. LOTS of trig. But everything that you learn in there can be 100% ported to Max almost object for object.

 

Finally Andy Farnell's "Designing Sound". Read this one after Musimathics 1 and 2.

Edited by Entorwellian
Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.musimathics.com/

 

These two books. Buy them, download them or steal them. These are the *best* books I have read on teaching the subject to someone who is a layman. It's trig and algebra heavy but they have appendixes at the back to give you a refresher on everything and it goes through Physics 101 in relation to music. It translates the differential calculus parts into (long) algebra so you don't have to go beyond Algebra II. You can throw in the equations and constants that are in the books and put them into Max. One third of the first volume is dedicated to algorithmic and generative music composition.

 

Secondly, there is also Miller Puckette's Theory of Electronic Music, but its a very difficult read. LOTS of trig. But everything that you learn in there can be 100% ported to Max almost object for object.

 

Finally Andy Farnell's "Designing Sound". Read this one after Musimathics 1 and 2.

This looks great. Thanks for the recommendation.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to sound like a salesperson, but i have some resources on my website in my signature that cover everything between complete newbie and algebra 2 with links to additional resources.

Not at all - thanks for sharing all this great information!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tried MaxMSP a number of times, and which I think it's neat, most of what I hear from myself (and others) is stuff that can easily be made in a DAW. The only reasons I'd ever really go indepth with MAX is if I find a limitation in what I'm trying to do in my DAW. It's also important that I be able to get it done reasonably quick/efficient, so if it's somehow faster in MAX, then that would be a good reason to go to it for me I guess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

http://www.musimathics.com/

These two books. Buy them, download them or steal them. These are the *best* books I have read on teaching the subject to someone who is a layman. It's trig and algebra heavy but they have appendixes at the back to give you a refresher on everything and it goes through Physics 101 in relation to music. It translates the differential calculus parts into (long) algebra so you don't have to go beyond Algebra II. You can throw in the equations and constants that are in the books and put them into Max. One third of the first volume is dedicated to algorithmic and generative music composition.

 

Secondly, there is also Miller Puckette's Theory of Electronic Music, but its a very difficult read. LOTS of trig. But everything that you learn in there can be 100% ported to Max almost object for object.

 

Finally Andy Farnell's "Designing Sound". Read this one after Musimathics 1 and 2.

 

 

Nice one, will definitely check them out. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Similar Content

    • By lala
      my m4l game is weak, it needs upping
    • By zleep
      Just did a new track, needs some improvement but really don't have the time recently.... w(゚Д゚)w
       
      85% generated by Max, some TT303 and logic ES2
       
      [youtubehd]A-lzhzyhwgE[/youtubehd]
       
       
      [sc5]167790974[/sc5]
    • Guest deferlow
      By Guest deferlow
      Sorry to lure you in all pervy. I hope that didn't break any rules. This is my EP...
       
      http://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=3595070575/size=medium/
    • Guest deferlow
      By Guest deferlow
      Okie dokie. This holiday post will be for the Ableton / Max for Live users here.
       
      1st to reply to this thread gets one item of their choosing from the Bit Voltage Store
       
      Also: Bit Voltage on Facebook (if you wanna keep up with holiday goodness)
       
       
       
    • Guest deferlow
      By Guest deferlow
      I posted this in the Autechre forum, but I'm kinda proud of the system I've been creating in order to perform real-time electro-acoustic music. Here's my rendition of Autechre's "Cichli" as a test run for said system.
       

×
×
  • Create New...